PDA

View Full Version : "Part Two" Collecting Newspapers From The The Old West



Johnnie
05-19-2005, 01:59 PM
The other day we posted our experience in the hobbie of collecting old newspapers from Bodie, and other frontier towns of the old west. When we started the hobbie back in the 1950s we found that hardly any one else was interested in collecting anything as large as a newspaper, This is when we realized we had no competion at all.

In the late 1950s newspapers collecting was not very popular as it is today, So when we started our search for old newspapers we found that the supply was not there, Once in a while we would come accross some at an antique store. but no newspapers with big headlines except for the eastern newspapers like the "Harpers Weekly" or "Frank Leslie's Illustrated" that had all the updated news fron the war front, and always had great illustrations, so you could visulize from these early artist's what it was like from their point of view.

In the 1800s there was that new concept of photographs but they did not know at that time how to put the photograph on to the newspapers, that came along much later. As time went on we found that newspapers from the "early" 1800s were more plentiful mainly because they were made from rag paper, but around the 1870s and after the paper was not of the best quality and did not hold up as good.

As our search continued for newspapers from 1870s up to the 1920s we found that these newspapers when we did find them we in bad shape, but did find some good ones in our 50 year search,

But the newspapers we were always looking for was the newspapers from the old west frontier towns that had some interesting stories about the townspeople or some treasure story that made us think that maybe there was that hidden loot still out there undiscovered, like the story we read about in on of the Tuscarora, Nevada newspaper how one of thier citizen had lost a sack of gold coins in a stream bed during a storm on his way to town.

There is so much valuable information to be found in these old newspapers, that have been lost over time. As we all know many a treasure story came right of these old newspapers.

We will try to find some time soon, to post more information, and history about this very intersting hobbie of newspaper collecting.

Your Fellow ghosttowner
Johnnie & Sheila

Johnnie
01-28-2008, 07:49 AM
The other day we posted our experience in the hobbie of collecting old newspapers from Bodie, and other frontier towns of the old west. When we started the hobbie back in the 1950s we found that hardly any one else was interested in collecting anything as large as a newspaper, This is when we realized we had no competion at all.

In the late 1950s newspapers collecting was not very popular as it is today, So when we started our search for old newspapers we found that the supply was not there, Once in a while we would come accross some at an antique store. but no newspapers with big headlines except for the eastern newspapers like the "Harpers Weekly" or "Frank Leslie's Illustrated" that had all the updated news fron the war front, and always had great illustrations, so you could visulize from these early artist's what it was like from their point of view.

In the 1800s there was that new concept of photographs but they did not know at that time how to put the photograph on to the newspapers, that came along much later. As time went on we found that newspapers from the "early" 1800s were more plentiful mainly because they were made from rag paper, but around the 1870s and after the paper was not of the best quality and did not hold up as good.

As our search continued for newspapers from 1870s up to the 1920s we found that these newspapers when we did find them we in bad shape, but did find some good ones in our 50 year search,

But the newspapers we were always looking for was the newspapers from the old west frontier towns that had some interesting stories about the townspeople or some treasure story that made us think that maybe there was that hidden loot still out there undiscovered, like the story we read about in on of the Tuscarora, Nevada newspaper how one of thier citizen had lost a sack of gold coins in a stream bed during a storm on his way to town.

There is so much valuable information to be found in these old newspapers, that have been lost over time. As we all know many a treasure story came right of these old newspapers.

We will try to find some time soon, to post more information, and history about this very intersting hobbie of newspaper collecting.

Your Fellow ghosttowner
Johnnie & Sheila

Here is (part II) on Newspapers, in the old west. and what it ment to know what was going on around the west.:eek:

Johnnie and Sheila

bad bob
01-28-2008, 02:49 PM
Here is (part II) on Newspapers, in the old west. and what it ment to know what was going on around the west.:eek:

Johnnie and Sheila



Very interesting stuff J & S. I noticed just such a "treasure" story in one of my gt books. Three banditos held up the Carson to Bodie stage and made off with $30,000 gold bullion. Two of the mexicans were killed soon after the robbery, and the other died of his wounds in jail. None of them disclosed the location of where they stashed the stolen gold.

So the whereabouts of the gold was unknown, but had to be in the general vicinity of the holdup because they were all caught shortly afterward, according to the story in the book.

Through the Carson City library, I checked old newspapers on microfilm through the years 1880-1890, from both Carson and Bodie newspapers and found no mention of that particular robbery.

Gold prices about 15 years ago, when I was searching, would have made that gold bullion worth about $1.7 million, but with todays prices, could be worth approx $3 million. :)

Johnnie
01-29-2008, 05:59 AM
Very interesting stuff J & S. I noticed just such a "treasure" story in one of my gt books. Three banditos held up the Carson to Bodie stage and made off with $30,000 gold bullion. Two of the mexicans were killed soon after the robbery, and the other died of his wounds in jail. None of them disclosed the location of where they stashed the stolen gold.

So the whereabouts of the gold was unknown, but had to be in the general vicinity of the holdup because they were all caught shortly afterward, according to the story in the book.

Through the Carson City library, I checked old newspapers on microfilm through the years 1880-1890, from both Carson and Bodie newspapers and found no mention of that particular robbery.

Gold prices about 15 years ago, when I was searching, would have made that gold bullion worth about $1.7 million, but with todays prices, could be worth approx $3 million. :)

Lets Go!! B B These stories realy get us motivated.. We found a old news paper 30 years ago from Reno Nevada,

Not that old of newspaper, as i remember it was from the 1930s but it had two full pages of real detail descripition of that train robbery in the 1870s just west of Reno, The newspaper reporter spent alot time researching the train robbery and i feel like could walk to the spot were they hid out and waited for a day or so to take over the east bound train. In the artical it stated that just some of the loot was recovered but most of it was never found after the capture of the bandits.

I have heard of this treasure story before but not in such detail as this one in this newspaper. Usually the treasure stories in treasure books are short and are among many others that people have complied into these treasure books that are later sold at local book store. Interesting but we always need more facts then these type books offer to start our searches.

When we find more time we try to post more treasure stories that we have collected.

One interesting treasures story i remember my mother told my sister and i when we were kids. I n this old mining town she was born in and involed a treasure story that made the headlines of her local newspaper in the early part of 1900s

We love the treasures stories that lost and but not found, We found by talking to some of these oldtimes that lived in an area when these stories were the talk of the town. sometimes don't go any futher than the outskirts of town.:rolleyes:

Your fellow treasure hunters
Johnnie & Sheila

bad bob
01-29-2008, 11:47 AM
Lets Go!! B B These stories realy get us motivated.. We found a old news paper 30 years ago from Reno Nevada,

Not that old of newspaper, as i remember it was from the 1930s but it had two full pages of real detail descripition of that train robbery in the 1870s just west of Reno, The newspaper reporter spent alot time researching the train robbery and i feel like could walk to the spot were they hid out and waited for a day or so to take over the east bound train. In the artical it stated that just some of the loot was recovered but most of it was never found after the capture of the bandits.

I have heard of this treasure story before but not in such detail as this one in this newspaper. Usually the treasure stories in treasure books are short and are among many others that people have complied into these treasure books that are later sold at local book store. Interesting but we always need more facts then these type books offer to start our searches.

When we find more time we try to post more treasure stories that we have collected.

One interesting treasures story i remember my mother told my sister and i when we were kids. I n this old mining town she was born in and involed a treasure story that made the headlines of her local newspaper in the early part of 1900s

We love the treasures stories that lost and but not found, We found by talking to some of these oldtimes that lived in an area when these stories were the talk of the town. sometimes don't go any futher than the outskirts of town.:rolleyes:

Your fellow treasure hunters
Johnnie & Sheila



Pretty sure I read that Reno Train Robbery story in Wild West Magazine a couple years ago.
But you're absolutely right. You shouldn't venture out looking for lost treasures without first
checking out all the details available.

Then, small group projects might work out best, to help pay for fuel and other things.
Just have to make sure friends don't turn out to be like Bogart in "Treasure of the Sierra Madre".

Was really hoping to find some accout of that stagecoach robbery in those microfilms. But I was able
to get a copy of a real blueprint on how to build a full-size authentic Concord Stagecoach. Has 2 large
rolled-up pages. I think the original blueprint was from the Smithsonian Inst.

Johnnie
01-30-2008, 03:48 PM
Pretty sure I read that Reno Train Robbery story in Wild West Magazine a couple years ago.
But you're absolutely right. You shouldn't venture out looking for lost treasures without first
checking out all the details available.

Then, small group projects might work out best, to help pay for fuel and other things.
Just have to make sure friends don't turn out to be like Bogart in "Treasure of the Sierra Madre".

Was really hoping to find some accout of that stagecoach robbery in those microfilms. But I was able
to get a copy of a real blueprint on how to build a full-size authentic Concord Stagecoach. Has 2 large
rolled-up pages. I think the original blueprint was from the Smithsonian Inst.

We just saw that great Bogart, classic last month on cable, I hear you about finding more info.

If they can find sunken treasure in the middle of the ocean we find treasures here in the U S. Keep us all posted B B

Lots of luck
Johnnie & Sheila

xplor'npaul
10-02-2008, 07:50 AM
I know I'm a little late, but, where does one go to buy old newspapers?

Tommyknocker
10-02-2008, 04:51 PM
"Fred C. Dobbs sticks his neck out for no one, see?"

David A. Wright
10-02-2008, 05:37 PM
I know I'm a little late, but, where does one go to buy old newspapers?
I've bought a couple on eBay, but it was some years ago when it was still a small site and there wasn't the huge amount of crap going on there by those with automatic bidding bots that post rapid fire bids within the last seconds of the bidding.

You can also check such sites as http://www.abebooks.com/ which you can search and a list of what you are looking for comes up from myriads of used bookstores across the US.

David A. Wright
10-02-2008, 05:41 PM
I also find that microfilms are better than simply collecting old newspapers. Nearly all town libraries have collections of them, as well as a microfilm reader. Museums also have collections.

For some fun reading, you might check out my Law & Order, Life & Death in the Great Basin series at:

http://www.gbr.4wdtrips.net/life_death/lifedeath-laworder_INDEX.htm

Opening that page will then have a sub-menu of individual states. Clicking on a state menu then opens a menu of towns and locations within that state that I have newspaper items posted, either in whole or summarized. These are compiled from research I've done over the years and I'm still nowhere finished extracting my notes and putting them up online.

Johnnie
10-10-2008, 05:51 AM
I also find that microfilms are better than simply collecting old newspapers. Nearly all town libraries have collections of them, as well as a microfilm reader. Museums also have collections.

For some fun reading, you might check out my Law & Order, Life & Death in the Great Basin series at:

http://www.gbr.4wdtrips.net/life_death/lifedeath-laworder_INDEX.htm

Opening that page will then have a sub-menu of individual states. Clicking on a state menu then opens a menu of towns and locations within that state that I have newspaper items posted, either in whole or summarized. These are compiled from research I've done over the years and I'm still nowhere finished extracting my notes and putting them up online.

A litle late resonce on your great tip, but Sheila & I just don't get on the web to much any more. we seem to average only once a week lately. But we do hope too check in on ghost towns, more often in the future. Anyway thanks David for that link you listed.

Johnnie & Sheila