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Mawhamba
07-03-2005, 05:45 AM
I was wondering if anyone else considered abandoned/reallocated military installations to be ghost towns? Technically they are ghosts of their former selves...

Anyway, although some of these sites are still in use in some capacity, they are but a shadow of their former selves.

George AFB, Adelanto, California, closed in the ealy 90s as part of the Base Realignment And Closure (BRAC). Although George's runway and flightline-specific buildings are alive and used as part of the SoCal Logistics Airport, the residential areas of the base are effectively dead (more precisely, the northeast part of the site):
http://www.mawhamba.net/galleries/thumbnails.php?album=42

Eaker AFB, Blytheville, Arkansas, closed during the 90s BRAC, although some parts are still alive (muni airport, some industry), a good portion of the site is dead:
http://www.mawhamba.net/galleries/thumbnails.php?album=94

Fairmont Army Air Field (AAF), Fairmont, Nebraska -- Open as a state airport; but only about 5 out of hundreds of buildings still stand -- there are tons of foundations and other ruins, however:
http://www.mawhamba.net/galleries/thumbnails.php?album=128

Bruning AAF, Bruning, Nebraska -- Part of a large feedyard operation -- some buildings (namely the standing hangars) have been turned into grain elevator-type storage -- others are left empty. Many building foundations, flightine still intact:
http://www.mawhamba.net/galleries/thumbnails.php?album=129

There's another AAF about 45 miles NW of here (Omaha) near Fremont called Scribner. I don't think any buildings still stand, but the flightline's still there -- used as a drag strip.

Why military installations? Well, if you've ever been to Nebraska, half the state's a ghost town. Sorry, don't get me wrong, I love it here, it's just very difficult to find "ghost towns" like you do in the west -- the land's too valuable, agriculturally, so I have to be a bit more creative in my searching.

I'd like to submit them to GT, but would like to know what other people think before I do so. Any input would be appreciated.

Thanx!

~Mawhamba~

old judge
07-03-2005, 09:47 AM
I suppose most previously populated, now abandoned, or mostly abandoned, populated places could be technically fit into a Ghosttown category. The word "town" does give pause, however. In my own hometown there were once two Naval bases. They were established in the early 40's and had pretty much been abandoned by the Navy by the mid to late 50's. While some buildings were leased out from time to time for current use, by and large they stood abandoned and deteriorating until fairly recently. As a lad, I was familiar with the hustle and bustle, comings and goings of these two airfields and training facilities. Sailors everywhere, the tensions between townies and swabbies, fights between local boys and sailors for the favor of lovely young local gals, etc. I also spent several years myself as a sailor, in many far away ports, U. S. and foreign. When I returned here in the early 70's, I could walk among the old facilities, Pools, Garages, Mess Hall, Barracks, Hospital, Gymnasium, etc. and almost hear the Sailors marching on the grinder, and the grumbling gobs on their way to morning mess. But the place would have meant little to me without childhood memories of the place and my own Naval experience. Military bases are not likely, I think, to have the universal appeal of an 1800's ghost town, where we can almost all sit quietly and truly imagine, if somewhat inaccurately, the past. My answer to your query then is a qualified no. OJ

Bob
07-03-2005, 09:54 AM
I would agree that George AFB meets the definition of "A shadowy semblance of a former self," a famous quote often used as a valid definition if a type of ghost town. For every BRAC, there are a half dozen pos-WWII closed and in many cases completely abandoned facilities. True, only concrete runways and minimum evidence remain but they too, meet the definition of of a ghost town. The great WWI / WWII /Korean and Viet Nam Naval Ammunition Depot around Hawthorne, Nevada, abandoned by the Navy and used till this year by the Army is "A shadowy semblance of a former self." However the housing area Babbitt is like George, is still standing but abandoned and I consider a prime ghost town. I encourage you to document and share any such ghosts. The list could include interment camps, manned test facilities, manned emergency landing fields, and POW facilities which have fallen into disuse. You could include places that have been officially closed and then perhaps acquired and converted to another purpose. I don’t consider Stead AFB as a current ghost because it was so completely turned into an industrial complex but the Tonopah AAS used for train WWII bombers sure qualifies even though it now functions as the civil airfield for Tonopah.

Sometime the reality differs from the “official” report, I cite a description of an old WWII site, used by the CIA during the height of the Cold War (Developed the U2 spy planes) and “officially” closed in 1962 as such example. This like so many other ghosts here in Nevada this is still behind locked and guarded gates so verification is not possible. I consider it fair game to have fun with “official” stories. The description I cite is for this ghost of Watertown (Also called The Ranch) A CIA sponsored community located at the old World War II Groom Range training facility in southwest Lincoln County. Despite strong Air Force denials to its existence, this community may not be a ghost yet!

Bob
07-03-2005, 10:19 AM
Hey Old Judge, guess you and I were posting at about the same time. I do respectively disagree :) the definition of ghost town really includes such places. I do see what you mean about them not being the same as an 1800s Wood Store Front classical ghost but so many of the ghosts I chase have little or any evidence of past life except from the histories. I can stand ai ghost called Rose’s Well and feel the excitement of an active turn of the 20th century water station and but without rooting around to find an old can or two, most would not be aware that there had ever been community. Without the history provided by one’s research and fellow ghost town enthusiasts, your home town Navy bases would be nothing more than a street name on the current map. Almost all ghosts of the past are not “…an 1800's ghost town, where we can almost all sit quietly and truly imagine, if somewhat inaccurately, the past.” Most ghosts require research and shared knowledge to then “…sit quietly and truly imagine, if somewhat inaccurately, the past.” My response is an unqualified YES, I am interested in any ghost of the past, even if today a giant Casino and Hotel occupies the location where an 1850 river crossing and fledgling community once existed. I consider Hunter's Crossing as a ghost town worthy of investigation and research, you would have me call it Reno ;)

old judge
07-03-2005, 11:22 AM
Bob: I see your point, and perhaps I put more emphasis on the "town" in Ghost Town than is appropriate. After all, I've GT'd at old pony express stations and military posts and didn't consider it other than Ghost Towning. I also count other former populated places, such as those occupied by our Indian ancestors, as bona fide GT locations. Maybe it's the antiquity issue that bothers me. That, and my concern about how you would define Glenn Dale Hospital, unquestionably a previously populated place bearing little resemblance to its former self, a mere shadow of earlier glories. But, I didn't spend a good part of three different decades listening to only one side of the story. I'll agree to an unqualified "IT DEPENDS". OJ

Mawhamba
07-03-2005, 11:58 AM
Hi!

First and foremost, let me apologize for my first post. Rereading it, it looks as though I were drunk when I wrote it. I'll proofread before I post this time.

Second, thank you for the feedback. Let me explain where I'm coming from a bit better. As a veteran, I've been on several military installations. Military installations, at least US Military installations are cities in-and-of themselves. Installations usually have at least one supermarket and department store (commissary and exchange, respectively) at least one or more religious edifices (usually one which wears the hat of Church, Mosque and Synagogue, if possible), a section zoned for industrial use (machine shops, civil engineering, "plane mechanics"), a section zoned for residential use (base/post housing), parks, hospitals, mini marts, etc., etc. ad nauseum. The cut and dry of it is that these are cities where people live, in which they are born, sometimes die, and rarely are buried. When DoD decides to close one of these installations, their deaths are much as those of civilian towns, with a gradual decline in population and services. The vacuum, however, caused by their deaths is, in my personal opinion, greater than that of civilian towns as the closing of military installations can lead to the formation of new civilian ghost towns or civilian towns that are barely living. Some of these installations have had populations rivaling those of living cities. For example, Bruning AAF, at its height, had a population of ~3,000 service members and 500 civilians. The village of Bruning, in comparison, at its height in 1910 had a population of 350 (http://www.google.com/url?sa=U&start=1&q=http://www.unomaha.edu/~cpar/table_3b3.pdf&e=9797). As of 2000, Bruning has a population of 300. As an added aside, the village of Bruning is far more depressing than is the site of the old Army Airfield.

In closing, there are a number of sites listed on GT.com which may not qualify, necessarily, as Ghost Towns. For example, the Rock Creek Station, in southeast Nebraska is listed on GT.com. It was never, though, a town. It was a ranch at which perhaps a handful of souls lived. Nevertheless, my personal feelings are that this doth qualify as a GT or at least a ghost site or something of equal verbiage that gives insight into its lost past.

- GJR -

Bob
07-03-2005, 12:37 PM
Mawhamba, I think the concept of a “town” is also very broad. I don’t know Rock Creek Station, in southeast Nebraska but I consider an extended ranch, one where non-related persons lived as a ghost town. Many such ranches served as post office, general supply locations for nearby ranches and such and locale with but a handful of souls is within the broader definition. I think we all recognize that occupied locales that give “insight into its lost past” are part and parcel GT,COM.
Old Judge, I guess I’ve seen the term Ghost towns painted with a mighty wide brush, I feel an old pony express or Overland Stage station qualifies as they were inhabited by the station keeper and others in a situation non-family like a ranch. I consider whistle stops along railroads where only a maintenance crew resided the same way. I’m not sure about the “Glenn Dale Hospital” but know nothing of it. To me a hospital is part of a greater community and unless the community is a ghost, the hospital isn’t of concern. If you don’t consider Goldfield a ghost, it is hard to consider the Goldfield Hotel and I’d call the Hotel a structure in a town that was a “shadowy semblance of a former self", not a ghost town in itself, I’d hold that for some of the other places that are the subject “posts” we both take umbrage at.
I would consider a write-ups of a pony express, way station, stage stop, whistle-stop, abandoned bases, an old fort, a previously occupied mining camp or even the county seat of Storey County all appropriate for write-ups in Ghosttowns.com BUT…
Old Judge, you and I have expressed our opinions well. I ready to stop posting and see what others of the ghost town enthusiasts think; Flatiron, Johnnie, Cecile, Dezdan, Mikejts, Ryan Hill, Ghostdancer, David Wright, etc…

old judge
07-03-2005, 12:42 PM
I agree. I know Flatiron's a big Glenn Dale Hospital fan. Hmmm. I kinda like ghost site. And by the way, welcome to our new GTer, even if he is a Cornhusker. OJ

ghostsofnorthdakota
07-03-2005, 12:42 PM
I would say abandoned bases are definitely interesting, and places I would definitely like to visit. That said, we also put the emphasis on the "town" in ghost towns. We get lots of emails from people who want to suggest an abandoned farmstead or ranch, but we tend to stay away from those kind of places for a number of reasons...

First, private property concerns.

Second, we like to make optimal use of our expedition time, and that usually means trying to find a "town" where there will be numerous structures.

We have discovered that people have a more general interest in abandoned places, and aren't quite as married to the "town" as we are. So if we had some abandoned bases in ND with giant empty hangars and such, we'd probably go just for the photo opportunities alone.

Unfortunately, the only abandoned bases we have are radar bases which were shut down by the Salt II treaty, and re-developed as housing developments. Although we do have plenty of missile silos out here... maybe we can check out one of those...

On that subject, anybody seen Urban Explorers on Discovery Channel yet? Last episode I saw, they went to Denver to check out an abandoned missile silo, very creepy and nearly full of water....

Mawhamba
07-03-2005, 03:25 PM
I suppose I'll let it pass then, and maintain a Ghost Town only mindset here (I'm sure I can find a forum for my other abandoned area interests).

Thanx for the welcome -- I've been keeping tabs on the site for a while now, finally decided to join in :-)

Question: Whom do I contact to get updates performed on the listings for sites? I tried to make an update for Spring Ranch, Nebraska about two months ago and never heard anything.

BTW: Not quite a Cornhusker -- more a Trojan or a Bruin (c'mon it's just college ball) -- still stings to hear "St Louis Rams," born and raised in SoCal -- still can't stand the humidity -- give me 104, dry and tea and I'll be happy -- 88, 100% humidity and I'm in ****.

- GJR -

Flatiron
07-04-2005, 05:23 AM
I tend to agree that abandoned military bases still give me somewhat the same feeling as being in a "real" ghost town. Just 2 weeks ago, my wife and I spent a few hours exploring the remains of an ex-Naval Base in Babbitt, Nevada. (Hawthorne). I know yet another Bob, and OJ probably are familiar with Babbitt, and it was fun poking around the area. The military housing has been torn down recently, but the overgrown streets, sidewalks, and slabs are still there, as well as the mature trees that were planted many years ago. The bowling alley/pharmacy is about the only building left now, and it's kind of eerie to think about all the activity that was going on here at one time, and now being there all by ourselves. Anyway, that's my 2 cents worth. Oh , by the way. Bruins,Trojans, Sooners, Huskers? How about Huskies!

Rockcrusher
07-04-2005, 08:07 PM
I tend to agree that abandoned military bases still give me somewhat the same feeling as being in a "real" ghost town. Just 2 weeks ago, my wife and I spent a few hours exploring the remains of an ex-Naval Base in Babbitt, Nevada. (Hawthorne). I know yet another Bob, and OJ probably are familiar with Babbitt, and it was fun poking around the area. The military housing has been torn down recently, but the overgrown streets, sidewalks, and slabs are still there, as well as the mature trees that were planted many years ago. The bowling alley/pharmacy is about the only building left now, and it's kind of eerie to think about all the activity that was going on here at one time, and now being there all by ourselves. Anyway, that's my 2 cents worth. Oh , by the way. Bruins,Trojans, Sooners, Huskers? How about Huskies!
I lived in Babbit housing for a time in the 70's and I remember it well. A number of the houses that made up Babbitt were actually given away by the Navy when they owned the base . . . They're scattered from Schurz to Mina as senior citizen centers, churches, private homes and other sundry uses.

Although relatively unknown to the public, there were several other housing areas associated with the base. Most notable was Schweer Housing on the north side of the industrial area. Schweer was in use into the very early 80's.

Jumbo Housing, located to the north of Schweer was used during WWII when the NAD population swelled to around 3,000 military and their dependents. Like Babbitt, the Jumbo houses were all frame construction. Virtually nothing remains of Jumbo today.

Interestingly, Schweer housing is still intact but abandoned. The houses are all concrete block construction on slab floors. The Army declared it excess in 1998 but, as far as I know, the property has not been disposed of. During a recent trip to Hawthorne, I went up to the Schweer house we lived in when the base closed in 1980. Apparently, the wife and I were the last people to live in that particular house 'cause I found a box of stuff we thought the movers had lost when we moved to the Phillipines. Turns out it never got put on the moving truck but the Navy paid me for the loss.

Flatiron
07-04-2005, 08:46 PM
Rockcrusher...............That must have been pretty strange finding a box of your belongings still there after 25 years. I'm surprised nobody took the stuff. Thanks for the info on Babbitt.

Mawhamba
07-05-2005, 04:02 PM
So, then, does this support my original theory of abandoned military installations fitting into the category of Ghost Town?

- GJR -

old judge
07-06-2005, 07:47 AM
GRB: It depends....OJ

ghamilton
07-06-2005, 04:31 PM
In the not too distant past,I addressed this topic of military bases as ghost towns adnauseum.I won't repeat much of that,except to say that many bases reflected the "establishment"norm for work,recreation and housing of the time.The officers'row at many bases would have been at home in many upper middle class neighborhoods of the era in question.I have named some of the better examples that I have seen personally.REAL military ghost can also be totally abandoned bases,such as Walker Army Airfield in the middle of Kansas.I repeat my previous advice to go to the Phil Payette site,American Forts Network and the Freeman site,Abandoned and little known AirfieldsThese 2 excellent sites will take you to a wealth of info on the subject.My previous posts can easily be found.My current bad itch revolves around a place on the James River,East of the historic flowerdew Hundred site,called Ft.Powathan.Read the brief description on the forts site.This was a major base during the War Between The States(War of Northern Aggression)Two battles took place there,a pontoon bridge across the James was on site.It has been locked away since the war and jealously guarded against any public visits.Thousands of troops lived here for quite a period of time.It had decades of habitation,including being built on the site of a large,fortified Indian town.

Mikejts
07-06-2005, 10:43 PM
How about adding abandon Missile sites to the "Ghost Town' category. My Brother in law had me check out a couple sites here in Colorado for him as he was thinking of buying one and fixing it up. Located several for sale in Colorado, went with GPS in hand and found them. After investigating the cost to clean up the asbestos it was in the millions. Neat idea, build a home inside the silo but **** expensive.

ghamilton
01-15-2006, 11:44 AM
I find it difficult to classify a missle ste as a ghost town.Just not enough there.Most sites weren't a "town"People were rotated in and out.The families didn't live,give birth and die there,as at a "normal"base.A real neglected area of military ghost were the WW I era camps.They were built up fast,but seldom preserved.Some were just built over,like two in the greater Norfolk area.Historical markers mention them,but they are driven past and rarely noted.Some just disappeared without a trace.A couple pretty good remants of WW I airfields exist near Fort Worth,TX and Ft.Myers,Fla.,plus near Fairchild Tropical Gardens,S.of Miami.The SW Fla site has the most bldgs extant.The thing about the WW I sites was the lack of paved runways,paved streets,etc,that contributed to their rapid disapperence.Some were brought back and reused in WW II,to more or lesser degrees.Those are the ones most in evidence today.Actually there are two WW I airbases with good remnants near Ft.Myers.I've noticed the WW II buildings are going bye bye faster and quicker than before.I've been on three Va forts in the past few weeks and the difference from a few years ago is muy dramatica.Lovely,charactor-filled(and ghost-filled) WW II temp bldgs replaced with the most mundane of institutional looking crap that looks like it belongs at Liberty Univ.

Mikejts
01-15-2006, 12:15 PM
I find it difficult to classify a missle ste as a ghost town.Just not enough there.Most sites weren't a "town"People were rotated in and out.The families didn't live,give birth and die there,as at a "normal"base.A real neglected area of military ghost were the WW I era camps.They were built up fast,but seldom preserved.Some were just built over,like two in the greater Norfolk area.Historical markers mention them,but they are driven past and rarely noted.Some just disappeared without a trace.A couple pretty good remants of WW I airfields exist near Fort Worth,TX and Ft.Myers,Fla.,plus near Fairchild Tropical Gardens,S.of Miami.The SW Fla site has the most bldgs extant.The thing about the WW I sites was the lack of paved runways,paved streets,etc,that contributed to their rapid disapperence.Some were brought back and reused in WW II,to more or lesser degrees.Those are the ones most in evidence today.
Guess on reflection I would have to agree. A missle site just doesn't qualify as a Ghost town. Most were out in the toolies someplace and no "town" was every really closely associated with them.

Ghostdancer
02-16-2006, 05:53 PM
This gets me to thinking about Ft. Ord, California which was closed down over 10 years ago. It was there that I had all my training when I was serving in the Army.

I understand the barracks are still standing; would love to visit sometime.


Tom

mercury
04-14-2006, 10:26 PM
Hi.

One spot that might qualify (and should be on your must see list) is Fort McDowell.

Located on Angel Island, a California State Park in the middle of San Francisco Bay, Fort McDowell was one of the major embarkation points during WWI for troops leaving the western US. After WWI, the army base was abandoned and stands today a rotting shell, echoing only the quiet sounds of the birds using her edifices as aeries and rookeries; a quite quiet remnant of the once bustling final stop for the lads' great oversea adventure. The pictures at this link do not do the place justice; hard to get a great photograph actually. Because space was at such a premium, this army base is more compact, hidden by the environment it was built into and has since grown up around. This Fort McDowell is not real well known and overshadowed by the fort/town/casino of the same name in Arizona. Angel Island, once known entirely as Fort McDowell (and Goat Island), is well worth the effort. )

No residents, dozens of extant structures, and a state park.

IMO, using those criteria Ft McDowell is a ghost town as much as Bodie is!

http://www.angelisland.org/mcd02.html
http://www.parks.ca.gov/default.asp?page_id=1307

John Forney
04-25-2006, 08:39 PM
I posted a reply under the thread "Dangerous Ghost Towns" regarding the former military installation at Igloo, SD.. if you plan to go there, read that thread.

ArizonaNativeDude
05-15-2006, 03:53 AM
Abandoned places where people lived, worked and sometimes died works for me as a definition of a "ghost town". Personally, anyplace that human history once existed works for me too, even it it was a ranch, tent city, or a military base at one time.

Airborne Ranger
01-31-2007, 07:21 PM
Well, I guess I have to chime in here. I was an Air Force brat and then served for 12 years on active duty in the Army with 4 more in the Guard. To me, former bases are towns; most of the time, in addition to the temporary military people assigned their, many also had their families along. Further, most bases had significant civilian populations living on the base or just outside it. As a military historian, I have a natural affinity for visiting former Army bases. One of my fondest memories as a teenager was getting to visit the Air Base in Dreux, France, which my grandfather had commanded in the 1950s before DeGaulle said "Non."

A portion of the base was being used by the French military, but that didnt stop me from crawling under a gate and making my way through the old hangars, admin and command buildings and barracks. It seemed as though the airmen had just left the base even though this was 1976. In the ops building, maps of Central Europe and Russia still hung on the walls, there was still furniture in the rooms and filing cabinets with discarded files.

I think that old forts and bases are a critical part of understanding our history in the US and even overseas. In my opinion, they do qualify.

southpoint
07-26-2007, 03:15 PM
When we were RVing out West around Casa Grande, Az. for our travel site (http://www.southpoint.com/index-us.html), I was out hiking in the desert. Came across several concrete slabs (http://www.southpoint.com/states/az/casagrande/corpofengrs2.jpg), and a few with deep "silos" (http://www.southpoint.com/states/az/casagrande/drain.jpg) in the ground. Threw a rock in one and didn't ever hear it hit bottom.. Had Corp of Engineer survey markers. Think it used to be a flight training area for bombing in the 1940s and 50s.

1956 Buick
07-31-2007, 10:38 AM
I'm new on here and was reading past posts. To Bob, when were you last at Babbit? All the houses have been moved away. The only things left are the school and the bowling alley. Both are used by the town of Hawthorne. I wish I could have seen it in the 60's. We lived in Hawthorne untill 1991. I really miss the desert.

Rockcrusher
08-01-2007, 11:32 AM
I'm new on here and was reading past posts. To Bob, when were you last at Babbit? All the houses have been moved away. The only things left are the school and the bowling alley. Both are used by the town of Hawthorne. I wish I could have seen it in the 60's. We lived in Hawthorne untill 1991. I really miss the desert.
We lived in Babbit for a short while until we bought a house in town. Sold the house and moved up to Schweer housing just after New Year, 1980. We lived there until October/November. Sometime in the last couple of years Schweer was bulldozed.

From a post I made in July, 2005

Schweer housing is still intact but abandoned. The houses are all concrete block construction on slab floors. The Army declared it excess in 1998 but, as far as I know, the property has not been disposed of. During a recent trip to Hawthorne, I went up to the Schweer house we lived in when the base closed in 1980. Apparently, the wife and I were the last people to live in that particular house 'cause I found a box of stuff we thought the movers had lost when we moved to the Phillipines. Turns out it never got put on the moving truck but the Navy paid me for the loss.

verynicebecky
08-20-2007, 05:13 PM
so is one free to wander around on the base?

HollyDolly
10-18-2007, 10:28 AM
I remeber when we lived in Alaska.My dad was stationed at ElmendorfAFB,at the Alaskan Air Command.We drove out to this place that had once been some sort of base or station.It didn't have any buildings there,but had been used during WW2.Nothing creepy about the place.
Fort Mckavett in Texas is astate park now,but once had been a military post.Later after the army moved out in the 1860s or 70s,people moved into the buildings and it even had a post office.I can't recall when,but the state of Texas then took it over and the people had to move.
Yes,I would consider a military base a ghost town,since they have nurmerous buildings for various purposes just like a town.

tuutuutango
11-18-2007, 05:28 AM
Hey, I have been thinking the same thing! Just saw your post...

Thousands and thousands of young men (myself included) went through Basic and Advanced Training at Fort Ord, California (now nothing more than a Ghostly shell of itself...)

As an 18 year old kid straight out of West Texas... I thought I had died and gone to Heaven when I saw that beautiful part of the country for the first time in 1970.

Fast forward to 1986 when I was in San Francisco on business, I drove down to Fort Ord and it was (for me) a Ghost Town... Uncle Sam closed the place... And now in 2007, the place is even more "abandoned" and looks like many of the actual Ghost Towns I have visited in my travels...

I found a website a couple of years ago about Fort Ord and it has linked a lot of former soldiers together who used to "live" there. We share one thing in common... we have been "haunted" to see this glorious Army fort turned into a relic... Abandoned buildings with broken doors, broken windows with curtians blowing in the wind... For us who took basic there and know of guys who also served here before shipping off to Vietnam... we all believe the guys who didn't make it out of Vietnam haunt their old Army base...

So, although an abandoned Fort may not technically be a Ghost Town, for thousands of veterans, these places are as special as old mining camps and in some sense are "special" ghost facilities... I'm sure they only are worth seeing if you were in the service at the Fort in question...

Also, let me add HISTORIC FORT STOCKTON to the list.

I was born in Fort Stockton, Texas and the old Army outpost (from the late 1800s) has been restored... technically not a Ghost Town, but also a special place as we reflect on the souls who served and died their... Not too far away is Historic Fort Davis...

Old Forts that have been closed down and abandoned (and for those that have been restored) have special meaning to lot's of folks wanting to visit a historical place where people once lived and died... The old cemeteries located at or near the Forts are also worth a stop...

I'd like to recommend this website for anyone looking for a grand adventure of Texas Forts from the late 1800s...
www.texasfortstrails.com

By touring the Texas Forts Trail, you'll come very close to some ghost towns in Texas... So the trip might be a double-whammie.:rolleyes:

tuutuutango
11-18-2007, 05:47 AM
Old WW2 training bases are special places... Most of these guys are long gone... I can only imagine my dad, guy in the middle pf the photo who was an instructor pilot during the war, shown here with his Army Air Corp cadets... I believe these pilots are simply off on another flying adventure but still make "touch and goes" at the old bases they lived at... Each time I visit an airfield these guys trained at, I see the old WW2 hangers that are left, and I think of the mechanics who worked here maintaining the airplanes... the young men who flew them and I thionk of the new recruits who woke up to ther first morning of indoctrination... So for me, these in essence are "Special Ghost Towns"... communities that once existed where uncommon people once lived and laughed and learned... Maybe these old bases don't date back to the late 1800s, but wow, the events and things that once went on here... never to be duplicated again.

bcush10663
11-28-2007, 10:50 PM
From what I hear, Fort Slocum, which is situated on David Island at the western end of Long Island Sound, still stands and is completely abandoned, although some buildings were destroyed by a fire in the late 70's/early 80's. There is some interesting and thorough information on the fort's history at: http://www.home.earthlink.net/~michaelacavanaugh/id1.html

There is also a ton of interesting info on other NYC relics at: www.forgotten-ny.com (http://www.forgotten-ny.com)

Gravelrash
11-29-2007, 10:10 PM
Hey bcush, that "forgotten NYC" site is fantastic. Thanks for the tip!

purplefizz
06-20-2011, 11:40 PM
I actually live near GAFB and have been there! ^_^ Some of it is still used, not the hospital though. And security does not like visitors. lol

Ghost.WA
06-23-2011, 11:04 PM
I don't know even though the word "town" can be a contention, I still think old military bases would classify as ghost towns. People lived on them, they had most of the same properties as a true town only they were a military base.

Mike Woodfin
06-24-2011, 04:06 AM
Old forts are listed on Ghosttowns.com with no problem or issue.

Mining towns in Florida were connected with the phosphate industry and had company towns, very similar to military bases. When the mine was played out the houses were sold, moved, or demolished.

Turpentine and lumbermill towns faced the same fate as being demolished when the company moved.

When a military base also held a community, like Fort Dade on Egmont Key, and the base closes the community becomes abandoned.

I have no problem listing an abandoned military base community as ghost town a ghost town.