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safetybar
02-16-2006, 08:58 PM
Hello! I just wanted to throw a question out there in regards to everyones ghost town hunting. Has anyone ever run into any 'trouble' while exploring some of these abandoned towns? Has there been anyone else there that wasn't very inviting? Or anyone living there that wasn't particularly welcoming?

There was one time that I was doing some exploring while I was working in Colorado for a few months. I found what seemed to be an abandoned mining camp on a hill (no idea where I was .. but it was VERY far from the nearest paved road or house). I climbed the hill to take some pictures and explore. I looked down and saw my Avis rental Grand Prix sitting all alone in the distance...I had this horrible feeling that by the time I'd get back to the car the tires would be slashed. Then I kept wondering what I would do if while spying on my car, I saw a few people come out of the woods to inspect it and perhaps 'disable it' so I couldnt leave.

Maybe I've spent too much time with the horror movies. But I got down that hill pretty quick...that camp was eerie enough as it was...and got out of there.

Max Barnett
02-17-2006, 10:38 AM
I know exactly what you are talking about. I explore New Mexico a lot and the closer I get to the border the higher the anxiety. My pet fear is being in a tent with no view of what is around me while any one who comes up can see where I am and all my exits. I think the odds of some six o'clock news event happening is small but it still makes for something other than a peaceful night's sleep.
Because of this paranoia I built some special motion sensors that I place in the camp area and on the trail or road leading to my site. The sensors contact me by radio if anything over 30 lbs crosses in front of it. Depending on the terrain, I can locate the remote sensors up to a couple of miles away for a good "heads up" when someone is coming. The real value is the peace of mind. When I wake up in the night and think I heard something I'm not afraid to stick my head out of the tent for fear my head might be lopped off with a machete. If someone is out there this system will let me know. So far there has never been an alarm except when I step outside to relieve myself (that also tests it!).
Just wanted to tell this story so you know that you are not alone in your paranoia!
Max

Johnnie
02-18-2006, 09:57 AM
SaftyBar. experience reminds us of a experience we had in 1960 way up on the top of the Panamints Moutains, On one of our many trips to the famouse Panamint City, But this one trip I took my 1942 milatary jeep and planed to take some side trips so when my friend Bob, and I saw a small drit road leading off to the north of the town-site we thought it would be fun to see where it went so after about 15min. trugeing up this road we could hear a roar of another 4wd comeing up behind us, not knowing what to expect we felt we should be on the defence. We look at each other and expected the worse. As the two guys approched us we tried not to give the appearece of being scared but it wasn't easy because they had guns and we did not. Then they ask us what we were doing up there and we told them them that we were out exploring, Then they ask us would we like to see a mine at the top of the mountain and we told them to lead the way so when the wagoneer went around the next bend we found a small area where we could turn around in a few minutes we hightailing down the mountain and down Supprise canyon.

I will tell you we never went back on these trips with out protection (Seldom Seen Slim) the old Ballarat prospector always told us that the area at the top of Panamint City was protected by (Panamint Annie) who would shoot out your radiator So in that trip in1960 may have been ( Shotgun Annie) friends or maybe she ran them off and they were out exploring also like us who knows, but it was a very uncomfortable position to be in to say the least.

If anyone would like to read our posting about the history of Panamint city just go tho the top of the page of the bulletin board and type in Panamint city History and you can read our posting from a couple years ago. If you do plan a trip to this very historical mining camp go prepared it is a about 11miles to the top and 6 hr, hike. The road that we used in the 1960 trip was so good that a passager car could be used but now do to the landslides and washouts it is inpassable for any vehicle.

"Happy Trails"
Johnnie & Sheila







Your Fellow Ghosttowners
Johnnie & Sheila

Johnnie
02-19-2006, 09:43 AM
Hello! I just wanted to throw a question out there in regards to everyones ghost town hunting. Has anyone ever run into any 'trouble' while exploring some of these abandoned towns? Has there been anyone else there that wasn't very inviting? Or anyone living there that wasn't particularly welcoming?

There was one time that I was doing some exploring while I was working in Colorado for a few months. I found what seemed to be an abandoned mining camp on a hill (no idea where I was .. but it was VERY far from the nearest paved road or house). I climbed the hill to take some pictures and explore. I looked down and saw my Avis rental Grand Prix sitting all alone in the distance...I had this horrible feeling that by the time I'd get back to the car the tires would be slashed. Then I kept wondering what I would do if while spying on my car, I saw a few people come out of the woods to inspect it and perhaps 'disable it' so I couldnt leave.

Maybe I've spent too much time with the horror movies. But I got down that hill pretty quick...that camp was eerie enough as it was...and got out of there.

Hello! fellow ghosttowner we can sure relate to your experience as well.

Johnnie & Sheila

OldTroop
02-19-2006, 11:12 AM
Thats exactly why I carry a firearm with me when Im out and about. You should never go into the boonies with out a gun...even if its just a .22......I dont believe Ive ever ran into anyone ghost towning and searching that wasnt armed. Common sense tells you not to go off into the hills with out protection.
I want them to see me armed so they know this is not a person to mess with...if thats what they have in mind.

dexter200161054
02-19-2006, 12:21 PM
I will stay in the USA. Unless of course you take about 5-7 men with you with fire arms just in case, becuase going alone wouldn't be the smartest thing. My mom loves camping, and I there are several ghost towns within a 1/2 an hour or so.

GaryB
02-20-2006, 09:36 PM
I usually have a gun just in case I run into a rattlesnake that decides to get too friendly. But yes, after the murders a few years back at Yellowstone for instance, I decided having protection while I'm out in the boonies is a must. Some parts of the west are still wild unfortunately.


Luckily, I haven't ever had an issue while GT'ing. Most of my "experiences" have come while game hunting believe it or not.

Johnnie
02-21-2006, 08:03 AM
Thats exactly why I carry a firearm with me when Im out and about. You should never go into the boonies with out a gun...even if its just a .22......I dont believe Ive ever ran into anyone ghost towning and searching that wasnt armed. Common sense tells you not to go off into the hills with out protection.
I want them to see me armed so they know this is not a person to mess with...if thats what they have in mind.We are sure that most fellow ghosttowners have a story like ours to share also. As you can see in the photograph on all my post that i am more prepared than I was in 1960 trip. We are currantly working with a couple fellow ghosttowners that have their own web sites and hope to find a way install our 8mm films now on video of most of our trips to these ghost towns in the 1960s and letting everyone see what we saw in Panamint City when we had that experience we wrote about at the top of Panamints. And what Ballarat and (Seldom Seen Slim) look like and Gold Point, Old Dale, here in California, and Good Springs Nevada look like in the early 1960s. We hope to get this project going in a couple weeks. with their help. We sure the film will give more meaning to the stories we posted in the past.

Your Fellow ghosttowners
Johnnie Sheila

Johnnie
03-13-2006, 06:29 AM
:) [quote=Johnnie]Hello! fellow ghosttowner we can sure relate to your experience as well.

The old west legend still cireulates around the camp fires in Panamint Valley about horsemen that ride up and down Suprise Canyon around midnight.

Well when my friend Bob, and i were on that trip that took up to the top of the Panamints in my 42 milatary jeep that i wrote about a couple weeks ago, First started at the Pond at the mouth of the canyon that's where we spent the night by the pond and that night while we were sitting around our camp fire is when i told Bob, the story that i read several years before about the horsemen that always ride there horses up and down the canyon and not to be to scared because it was just a legend. But in the middle of the night we were awoke by the sound of hoofs that came from the nearby dirt road and from then on we could not get back to sleep. But at daybreak we went out onto nearby road and sure enough there in the sand was hoof prints, but later on when we told (Seldom Seen Slim) down at Ballarat, what we heard, that night by the pond in Suprise Canyon is when he chuckeled and said he had heard that same story many times before but added that it was probably a bunch of "Wild Burrows" that roam the nearby canyons and Panamint valley. Who knows for sure. So take for what it't worth, Thats our scary add-to ghost town experience.

Johnnie

Flatiron
03-13-2006, 06:32 PM
Just wanted to share my story about being in the boonies and running into trouble. Many years ago I was camping just outside the Jarbridge Wilderness area in Northern Nevada and had a peaceful nights sleep, only to find Sheriff's cars, a Coroners vehicle, and numerous unmarked cars, about a mile down the road from where I camped. I was stopped, of course, and was asked a whole slew of questions, as to where I was from, what I was doing in the area, and if I heard or saw anything strange the night before. After spending about an hour answering questions, I was allowed to leave. Two days later while travelling through Idaho, I heard on the radio that authorities had found 2 bodies of 2 older gentlemen who were shot and killed in their truck while deer hunting. They were from Twin Falls, Idaho, and had been missing for a couple of days. From that time on, I have carried a .357/.38 with me while out exploring. ...........:confused:

Mikejts
03-13-2006, 07:06 PM
After reading this it brings all sorts of my experiences to mind. Involving mountain lions, prospectors with no teeth, ( sort of like those in Deliverance), hippies sleeping in old cabins, men with guns, etc.

Good advice about carrying. I also like the motion detector idea.

cheever
03-14-2006, 07:04 AM
I know exactly what you are talking about. I explore New Mexico a lot and the closer I get to the border the higher the anxiety. My pet fear is being in a tent with no view of what is around me while any one who comes up can see where I am and all my exits. I think the odds of some six o'clock news event happening is small but it still makes for something other than a peaceful night's sleep.
Because of this paranoia I built some special motion sensors that I place in the camp area and on the trail or road leading to my site. The sensors contact me by radio if anything over 30 lbs crosses in front of it. Depending on the terrain, I can locate the remote sensors up to a couple of miles away for a good "heads up" when someone is coming. The real value is the peace of mind. When I wake up in the night and think I heard something I'm not afraid to stick my head out of the tent for fear my head might be lopped off with a machete. If someone is out there this system will let me know. So far there has never been an alarm except when I step outside to relieve myself (that also tests it!).
Just wanted to tell this story so you know that you are not alone in your paranoia!
Max

Max,

Would be willing to share your setup with everyone? I am very interested in what kind of setup you have.

Mikejts
03-14-2006, 05:51 PM
Me too - I would like to know more about the motion detectors. :D If you want send me a private message.

High Desert Drifter
03-15-2006, 10:31 PM
S&W 9mm, Glock 40cal. Mossburg 12ga police riot issue.

Yes Mr. wierd, Psycho, No Teeth, Smelly, Stalking, In-bred Nut Case..Lets Party!

By the way, anyone seen that independent film "29 palms" wow...

circusboy
04-08-2006, 01:23 PM
why are you all so paranoid about being all by yourself. what's out there to hurt you and why???

GaryB
04-09-2006, 10:31 PM
why are you all so paranoid about being all by yourself. what's out there to hurt you and why???

Weird Canadian people that like to run from the law for one thing. Like the guy they chased from Tonopah, NV to Death Valley and back. Google "Ballarat Bandit".

Plus I have never had it happen to me, but I know a couple of guys who went out hiking and walked up on a cougar that didn't particularly care for them being there at that moment. Luckily one had a 9MM which he emptied into the cougar as it went for his buddy.

I have whacked a rattler or two though that decided they weren't going to back off.

ghost_town_huntress
04-09-2006, 10:49 PM
I'm not at all scared of ghost towning by myself. I always bring my dog (a pit bull, don't worry, she's a really sweet dog, but I can definitely trust her to protect me if the need arises and I always carry my 9mm Baby Eagle with me too.

Dezdan
04-14-2006, 06:23 PM
I will tell you we never went back on these trips with out protection (Seldom Seen Slim) the old Ballarat prospector always told us that the area at the top of Panamint City was protected by (Panamint Annie) who would shoot out your radiator So in that trip in1960 may have been ( Shotgun Annie) friends or maybe she ran them off and they were out exploring also like us who knows, but it was a very uncomfortable position to be in to say the least.Wouldn't that be Shotgun Mary Slim mentioned to you?

~Dezdan

wolfpack
04-15-2006, 05:04 PM
I'm not at all scared of ghost towning by myself. I always bring my dog (a pit bull, don't worry, she's a really sweet dog, but I can definitely trust her to protect me if the need arises and I always carry my 9mm Baby Eagle with me too.

Same here but I have an Akita. I always have a handgun on me and a rifle nearby, usually an AR15. When in a tent I have all that and a shotgun, better to have it and not need it then the other way around.

coolguy0621
04-15-2006, 05:19 PM
A few years back I was camping in Seqoia Nat. Park. (sorry about the spelling). One night at around 2:00a.m. we got woken up by the sound of foot steps and heavy breathing. We all blasted holes every where through the tent..............no just kidding, we were not armed but wished we were. We just satyed still and got our knives ready. Luckly they left us alone. After a sleepless night wishing we had a firearm, we peaked out like little girls to see big cat tracks every where around our tent and camp sight. Probally moutain lions, but we could see by the tracks that there was two different size cats, and they had circled our tent quite a bit, probally deciding on what to do. Since then I have decided that a hand gun is worth the wieght, when back packing.

I would like to know more about the motion detectors, but it appears that this guy is no longer with us, anyone have any info. on this subject?

John Forney
04-25-2006, 08:37 PM
FWIW, if you should ever pass thru the Black Hills of SD, there is a old Military town called Igloo.

The town is actually referenced on this site. I was there on a photo trip 2 weeks ago. If you do go, WHATEVER YOU DO, DO NOT GET OFF THE MAIN GRAVEL ROAD. The landowner is not to be reasoned with and is under legal dispute for pulling a gun on some people.

He followed me for 2 hrs as I photographed the remaining buildings (from the road).

bob3 was bob2
04-26-2006, 05:25 PM
Hey John,

Did you talk with the owner? Just curious.

45-70Ranger
05-02-2006, 05:53 PM
why are you all so paranoid about being all by yourself. what's out there to hurt you and why???
For one thing, there are some not-too-friendly people.
There are druggies,that will stop at nothing to rob or kill you for their fixes.
The news is full of meth idiots.
They do go on crime sprees.
Some, are very willing to kill,just for the fun of it.Or, to rob you.It is hard telling,of what strangers have in mind.
Look at the news: coydog ,coyote attacks, cougars and bears.
If you think there's nothing to
hurt you,then YOU spend several nights at some of these places. I will guarantee you,you'll need a complete change of clothes,T.P. included.Cities,are much more scary.Some parts of this town,
are a "no man's land". The police won't go there at night.
Some here, found out the hard way; get armed for a peace of mind.
I've been out there,at night.No
flashlight,2 handguns and a 22 scoped rifle.I walked along a road,1/4 mile and back.
I already know the "pucker factor".
Gang, please include night vision. And survival kits.
You are wondering if I can shoot. Try 297 out of a possible 300. At the SDSO range.(San Diego County Sheriif's Department)
I also shoot,with a handgun open sights,out to 100 yards.
I'm a handgun hunter.Yes, I will shoot back.I don't need 911.
No brag,just fact.
I reload ammo.
This so-called "paranoia" you wrote about, is called "common sense". Something that many city people have lost.Most of them, has lost reality.They live in a fantasy world.
Yes, I will never go unarmed in isolated places.
I'd rather be safe than sorry.
Late November/early December,we were at Tombstone,AZ. I went to Cherokee Jack's.He told me, that if we were going on the backtrails,"load up". Why? Since drug smugglers are all over the place.I already knew of the situation.I took nearly all my guns,plenty of ammo.
That did include my 45-70 rifle.
I sure don't aim to wound.

ghamilton
05-02-2006, 06:40 PM
Great "motion detector"is soda cans strung on fishing line.Height is determined by the likely hood of bigfoot,cougars or bear.The biggest caliber handgun is the best.By the way,a great website for this kind of advice-guns and the wilderness is MADOGRE.COM.He writes for gun mags and test weapons for the manufacturers.Poor guy lives near that Skinwalker Ranch horror.

45-70Ranger
05-02-2006, 07:20 PM
Hiya !:D
Be sure to add some pebbles in the cans.Basic stuff used in Vietnam.:eek:

sMaShEr
05-02-2006, 09:28 PM
elow i js wana know wer can i get the whole info about the silent hill.

ghost_town_huntress
05-03-2006, 12:16 AM
Smasher, just out of curiosity, what silent hill? The ****** video game? The place doesn't exist.

Rachel ghost_town_huntress@yahoo.com

ghost_town_huntress
05-03-2006, 12:26 AM
However, talking about Silent Hill, I just went and saw the movie (based on the video game) tonight. For those of you who haven't played it or seen it: it takes place in an abandoned town in West Virginia and the coal underneath the town has been burning for 30 years and there's a demon and lots of ugly scary supernatural creatures roaming around. I remember seeing something about a town like that on tv (minus the demon and creatures)and decided to do a little research and remembered the name of the real town is Centralia, Pennsylvania. I'm wondering if the game was based on the town of Centralia and just renamed?
Rachel ghost_town_huntress@yahoo.com

ArizonaNativeDude
05-15-2006, 04:17 AM
Some years back I was exploring some of the many fantastic remains of the dozens of "ghost towns" in the Bradshaw Mountains of Central Arizona. As my friend and I neared an impressive structure (some sort of mining elevator), we were approached by a man with a military style shotgun and a huge pit bull dog. As he was screaming at us about trespassing he pointed to another man up the hill who had another weapon (scoped) aimed at us. Meanwhile the big dog was growling inches from my neck on the passinger side of the truck as my friend in the driver's seat was talking to the barrel of a very nasty 12 gauge shotgun. Though I had a large magnum handgun in my right hand under a towel, we were very courteous to these two "gentlemen" who allowed us to turn around and leave NOW. This experience really ticked us off, but we were in no position do disagree or offend then in any way. An hour later we arrived at the top of the hill in Crown King (summer homes, two bars and lots of legally armed people). No probs there. We were told to be extremly careful exploring the Bradshaws. Many people have legal mining claims that allows them to stay there even though they aren't mining. Many are making drugs (Meth or growing pot). The law only requires them to move so many tons of Earth a year to be legal (in living on that claim). Words of wisdom...before exploring do research, speak to law enforcement, forest rangers, game & fish etc as well as locals (not just in the place close to your destination). Small, desert town people are usually very poor, paranoid and heavily armed. Be Careful!

ArizonaNativeDude
05-15-2006, 04:58 AM
I used to be a professional jeep tour driver here in Arizona and though we dressed in 1880s getups and wore single action guns, we kept them loaded for business. Some our our guests had a real problem about this (some even declined to go on the tour). I began keeping newspaper clippings about stories like your's (FlatIron and just folded them in an envelope). This stuff was not info I would volunteer, but when a scared Bostonian or Canadian needed a real reason why we caried "hot" and live ammo I would break out this envelope. In all reality you would have a greater probability being shot in NYC, Toronto, or Boston than the boonies of AZ (not to mention threats from cougars and black bear from the high country in times of drought). Another aspect that I would tell them about was the fact that it would take sheriff's deputies (in ground units) 30x the response compared to cops in the cities where they live (cities that the guests live). For that reason we carried hot and some folks were petrified of us. Some aspects of the old west still remain to this day even though most of us (law abiding, non-fellon, armed US Citizens) who cherish our 2nd Ammendment, pray that we will never have to use this constitutional right.

utah-ghost
05-15-2006, 05:25 PM
I ALWAYS carry at least one handgun (visable) and a small rifle whenever I go out in the desert. I expect those that go along with me to do the same, even the wife.

I like my Ruger Ranch Rifle, but I also have a lever action rifle that's chambered for 357 Mag.

I've never had any trouble in over 25 years. Bad guys avoid a fair fight, they want easy victims.

Mikejts
05-15-2006, 08:35 PM
I used to be a professional jeep tour driver here in Arizona and though we dressed in 1880s getups and wore single action guns, we kept them loaded for business. Some our our guests had a real problem about this (some even declined to go on the tour). I began keeping newspaper clippings about stories like your's (FlatIron and just folded them in an envelope). This stuff was not info I would volunteer, but when a scared Bostonian or Canadian needed a real reason why we caried "hot" and live ammo I would break out this envelope. In all reality you would have a greater probability being shot in NYC, Toronto, or Boston than the boonies of AZ (not to mention threats from cougars and black bear from the high country in times of drought). Another aspect that I would tell them about was the fact that it would take sheriff's deputies (in ground units) 30x the response compared to cops in the cities where they live (cities that the guests live). For that reason we carried hot and some folks were petrified of us. Some aspects of the old west still remain to this day even though most of us (law abiding, non-fellon, armed US Citizens) who cherish our 2nd Ammendment, pray that we will never have to use this constitutional right.

Where did your tours go? What places / sites? Just wonderng.

Flatiron
05-16-2006, 05:55 AM
ArizonaNativeDude..............It still amazes me how many people are "scared" of guns and freak out at the presence of a weapon. As you know, we get quite a few of visitors from North of the Border where guns are illegal, and they always seem to be amazed at being able to carry a weapon in Az. Thankfully, not too many of the illegals flooding across the border are carrying weapons, although some of them do. My wife and I are in the process of setting up an ATV Tour business right now, and would like to hear about your experiences as a pro Jeep tour guide. Please PM me when you get a chance. Thanks........

brian10x
05-16-2006, 01:33 PM
ArizonaNativeDude..............It still amazes me how many people are "scared" of guns and freak out at the presence of a weapon. As you know, we get quite a few of visitors from North of the Border where guns are illegal, and they always seem to be amazed at being able to carry a weapon in Az. Thankfully, not too many of the illegals flooding across the border are carrying weapons, although some of them do. My wife and I are in the process of setting up an ATV Tour business right now, and would like to hear about your experiences as a pro Jeep tour guide. Please PM me when you get a chance. Thanks........
I know what you mean. I've never been afraid of guns, but I spent the first 28 years of my life in the left wing paradise of Hawaii, and never had exposure to them. But I was always curious, and when I moved to Miami, Florida, that curiosity blossomed into full blown gun nut. All the years of repression finally let loose.
Now that I live in Arizona, I can experience what real freedom is about. I'm still a little nervous carrying exposed in the "nervous liberal" city, but its great strapping on the old hogleg when I'm out hunting ghost towns. And its comforting to have 6 big slugs of lead between me and "what wants to et' me"
Jeff Cooper (see Google) invented a great word for those scared of guns. He calls them "hoplophopes" I hope I got that spelling right.

GaryB
05-16-2006, 03:02 PM
I think that if most folks (US) were exposed to guns and proper handling as kids, they not only wouldn't be afraid, but would come to respect their stature and need. Having respect for them might lower their use in illegal activites as well.

ArizonaNativeDude
05-20-2006, 04:39 AM
Gun possession requires in many aspects, more self control than having a driver's license. Although we make everyone that we grant a driver's license take tests to legally drive a car, we don't do the same for guns in Arizona (except a CCW permit). Now don't read me wrong here. I'm not for manditory licensing of firearms, but there are many people who who never had any exposure (hunting, gun safety, use of force issues legal/moral relating to certain stressful curcumstances, etc.) As the Western States bulge at the seams from Eastern US transplants, the percentage of legal gun ownership experience has to be less than from those coming from states that have had less firearm restrictions. I'm sort of for a federal legal firearms system that is based on a set of criteria. True, there are many people who were born and raised out west here that should not legally be allowed to possess any firearms, but just as a convicted fellon or incarcerated mental patient, cannot possess guns legallity, all should be subjected on the same qualifications. But in my idea, after a new, federal pre-determined date, first time gun buyers (handguns) NATIONWIDE should be required to take a new gun buyer course based on safety, use of force, emotional/drug/alchohol issues and proficency in the operation of such a weapon. It does sound like the DMV doesn't it? Of course this sounds alot like registration, but is on a NATIONWIDE BASIS and every legal American resident has a chance in exercising their 2nd Ammendment right that is really a privilage (like driving)! It would be nice to have a federal point system based on training with existing criminal histories. Unfortunately such a streamlined bill would still lead to Federal Licensing in which I will always be against. If gun control worked I might be for it, but all the data from around the world shows that it doesnt work (face it, the only ones who follow the rules are the ones who care about the rules-laws. criminals dont follow laws or rules). Gun control doesnt stop the cartels from having and using them as well as the armed and concealed 14 year olds dealing crack in our cities. The only ones who follow the rules are the ones who care about rules. How about building more prisons specifically aimed at 3 time gun fellon losers who do decades of manditory, very hard labor? Why penalize good people who follow the rules? Strict firarms legislation should be based on a qualification to posses them, legality to own them, and a strict responsibility to justly use them defensively. Habitual offenders using firearms need to have their locks welded up so keys will never work.

Velious
05-21-2006, 03:06 PM
??? i thought this was a ghost site not a gun site.

Flatiron
05-21-2006, 03:27 PM
No, Velious..........You've got that wrong. This is not a "ghost" site. It is a "ghost town" site. There's a big difference. If you read the previous posts, you'd see we were discussing "dangerous ghost towns", not "ghosts".............

coolguy0621
05-21-2006, 03:34 PM
Sticky subject Azdude.

Training for the first time gun owner would be a plus for sure.

But mandated at the federal level, I don't think that would end there. Our federal government has a hard on for making rules. I'm sure if you open their eyes to it and give them an inch..............

bad bob
05-21-2006, 04:56 PM
Take a deep breath Vesuvius, as Flatiron wrote, you shoulda read the rest of the thread, b4 jumpin' the "gun" & maybe gittin' yer linen in a bunch.
bb.

brian10x
05-21-2006, 06:20 PM
Take a deep breath Vesuvius, as Flatiron wrote, you shoulda read the rest of the thread, b4 jumpin' the "gun" & maybe gittin' yer linen in a bunch.
bb.
I think its appropriate to talk about guns on this site, as most of us have to consider protection on the trail. Personally , I'd enjoy more threads on using the GPS, 4WD preparation, first aid on the trail, favorite snacks, favorite pictures.

C'mon guys and gals! I'm sure I could learn a lot from you!
:)

GaryB
05-21-2006, 06:20 PM
Yes, talking about the legality of arming one's self to visit ghost towns is in the same field. Packing heat to hunt the boogey man in California isn't.

bad bob
05-21-2006, 08:24 PM
[quote=brian10x] Personally , I'd enjoy more threads on using the GPS, 4WD preparation, first aid on the trail, favorite snacks, favorite pictures.

/quote]

B10x may be onto something here, especially for the first timers.
Part of everyone's "essential equipment" list should include, besides the water (I forget the formula; one gallon per person for every 4 hours or ?) A first aid, and snake bite kit, and a shock kit for those that are allergic to bee & wasp stings.
Ol' Doc Rimrock may be on vacation, especially in remote locations, and you probably oughta know where the nearest hospital 'er clinic is.
Spare parts for vehicles such as alternator belt, battery, etc., (battery mentioned on recent post regarding horn on Ford Explorer goin' off).
Some of these things may be a bit overkill, depending on yer destination, vehicle, etc., but if ya get out there, and don't have a certain item, ya could be what I'd call scr**ed.
bb.

ghost_town_huntress
05-21-2006, 11:24 PM
You would be so sad to see just how easy it is to get a concealed carry permit here in Utah. My instructor didn't even give me half of the class and didn't take me to the range like he was supposed to and I passed everything with flying colors; and had barely even shot a gun once or twice before. It scares me to think it is this easy. ANYBODY could get it. I have had a lot of practice since and do know my gun a lot better now, but I took it upon myself to familiarize myself with guns; no instructor taught me. I do think there should be more training and stricter laws when it comes to gun ownership and concealed carry permits, but you're also right in the fact that criminals don't care about the laws and will get guns and use guns any way they can. I even know where to get guns illegally but much prefer to do it the legal way.

Rachel in Utah ghost_town_huntress@yahoo.com

45-70Ranger
05-30-2006, 07:42 PM
"stricter laws" for gun ownership ?
Re-read the 2nd Amendment.
Does, "SHALL NOT INFRINGE"
ring a bell ?
Lawyers are supposed to be highly educated. Apparently, none can read something very simple,much less understand it.
This government, already has too many laws on the books, with more comming.
We are losing our freedoms,day by day.
There are much written on the subject.Find it.
Join the NRA,or whatever membership you choose.
I don't want anymore of these insane laws.As we are being shackled.The government already has told you how to raise your child.
And, has stuck its' nose into your business.
As far as this goes, no more gunlaws.

NWNative
05-30-2006, 08:38 PM
I have to admit to being shocked by this thread! I am new to this forum but have been doing the GT thing for about eight years. It never even crossed my mind to take a gun.
I am wondering if I am naive, lucky or just a big weeny that stays too safe!

I suppose it makes sense but I travel with small children and keeping a gun with them around is scarey. I suppose that the argument could be made that with the kids I should be better protected.

Something to think about for the next trip I suppose.

bad bob
05-30-2006, 09:29 PM
Reality checks are always sobering, NW. The question is, do you want to keep pressing luck, or not?
Of course, gun safety is foremost, especially with small kids, but still very much doable.
First, educate yourself with as close to an expert as you can find. Know the gun laws for the area you'll be in. They probably vary from state to state. Practice the threat scenarios, until they become automatic. The adults HAVE to know what to do under threat, whether it's bears, or road bandits. Some of the gt'ers pack heat AND a mean dog. As you know, dogs will alert to threat long before humans. (Check the "informal poll" on this forum to see what arms some folks are carrying).
Lastly, don't fergit to have fun. Just being better able to protect yourself, and family, shouldn't ruin a trip. Besides, it's pretty much only the remote locations you may need to have yer radar up and runnin'.
bb.

GaryB
05-30-2006, 10:41 PM
I wouldn't say everyone that goes out exploring/camping needs a gun. But I would say that some sort of minimum protection is a good idea. Mace, tazer, self defense course , etc should be a good start. I'm usually in numbers which is good, but if I haven't got the gun on me, I have at least have my knife or ax, etc. You'd be surprised the damage a shovel can do when yielded as a weapon.

Some druggies that chase me off an area doesn't bother me so much as the psycho targeting folks out in the middle of no where. And they are just one step behind the hungry cougar.

utah-ghost
05-31-2006, 05:15 AM
I can’t understand why anyone would choose to put themselves (or their family and friends) into a situation where they might be needlessly at risk.

I have an old friend who was a police officer for over 30 years, and he once gave me some good advice on this subject. He said; If you ever get into a serious conflict with anyone in a remote place get away from them if you can. If you can’t, shoot them. Don’t fight anyone in that situation with anything other than a gun. If you do and you lose they literally own you, and they control your situation. There’s no one to call for help when you’re 30 miles from the closest town.

Guns are like a fire extinguisher; it’s better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

45-70Ranger
05-31-2006, 06:12 AM
I can’t understand why anyone would choose to put themselves (or their family and friends) into a situation where they might be needlessly at risk.

I have an old friend who was a police officer for over 30 years, and he once gave me some good advice on this subject. He said; If you ever get into a serious conflict with anyone in a remote place get away from them if you can. If you can’t, shoot them. Don’t fight anyone in that situation with anything other than a gun. If you do and you lose they literally own you, and they control your situation. There’s no one to call for help when you’re 30 miles from the closest town.

Guns are like a fire extinguisher; it’s better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.
Very wise advise.

Beatty
06-06-2006, 08:07 PM
Well there are many situations that are dangerous that can happen in most dangerous heres a quick list of them there's definitley more
1.You go inside A Abanoned building in a Uninhabited Ghost Town you get stuck.
2.You accidently fall into a mine.
3.You get lost.

4.You found out that you were exploring a Private Property Ghost Town and you got caught.

xplor'npaul
06-21-2006, 11:06 AM
Hi there folks,...... nice to "see "y'all ....I carry a .357 mag......however just for records sake so any newbies know where they stand, be advised that it is illegal to carry any weapon in a national park area......and if you do shoot, your going to jail for sure, even in self defense till it gets sorted out....especially if you live in California....you go to jail for shooting a burglar in your house! Not to mention getting sued by the suspect........thank you all you politicians..........grrrrrrr having said that, tho not paranoid, I'd rather be "tried by twelve, than buried by six......... also, a can of bear spray on your hip and your girlfriends hip as well......

bad bob
06-21-2006, 01:43 PM
Photo.
Unless the laws have been changed recently, last I heard in California, at home, one has the right to protect themselves from bodily harm, against yourself or your family. Self defense may also include the use of deadly force. This info from a deputy sheriff.
Criminals do have the right to sue the victims, but most judges will throw this out. The criminal then has court fees to pay on top of his/her other charges.
bb.

xplor'npaul
06-21-2006, 03:12 PM
thanks for the update bob, I must have had some bad intel....... glad to know the bad guys can get what they ask for..........

bad bob
06-21-2006, 03:21 PM
Your welcome....tho you still may be correct, depending if they have changed the laws here recently, which is not uncommon.
bb.

GaryB
06-21-2006, 05:35 PM
Not to mention getting sued by the suspect........

that's why you don't let them be a suspect, but instead a statistic ;)

xplor'npaul
06-23-2006, 08:20 AM
Howdy again......a couple of pages back someone was asking about camping alarms.....go to google and type in "wireless driveway alarm", there are some that run on 4 aa batteries and transmit up to 1200 ft.....also, radio shack has some small passive infra-red alarms for about 20 bucks that you can place anywhere....... for thoes of you really into parano, uh, security, go to "shomer-tec", they have trip wire and a device that sets off a blank shotgun shell,.....you attach it to a post or tree , and when somebody hits the trip wire....loud bang. Also, for some really bizzare shotgun self defense ammo check out "Hi-vel"....... Have fun and be safe out there!

xplor'npaul
06-23-2006, 08:24 AM
I agree 100% GaryB, center mass, tell no tales.....

coolguy0621
06-23-2006, 09:25 AM
. Try 297 out of a possible 300. At the SDSO range.(San Diego County Sheriif's Department)
I also shoot,with a handgun open sights,out to 100 yards.


You still in Southern Cal??? If so, I'd like to watch you work, and show you some of my skill too. Always fun to shoot with some one who has been around the game a while.

coolguy0621
06-23-2006, 09:29 AM
Howdy again......a couple of pages back someone was asking about camping alarms.....go to google and type in "wireless driveway alarm", there are some that run on 4 aa batteries and transmit up to 1200 ft.....also, radio shack has some small passive infra-red alarms for about 20 bucks that you can place anywhere....... for thoes of you really into parano, uh, security, go to "shomer-tec", they have trip wire and a device that sets off a blank shotgun shell,.....you attach it to a post or tree , and when somebody hits the trip wire....loud bang. Also, for some really bizzare shotgun self defense ammo check out "Hi-vel"....... Have fun and be safe out there!

Thanks........:D

LauraA
06-23-2006, 02:10 PM
... even on the internet you need protection;)



232

GaryB
06-23-2006, 03:20 PM
http://smilies.vidahost.com/otn/violent/badass.gif

Toymaker
06-25-2006, 09:17 AM
I used to be a professional jeep tour driver here in Arizona and though we dressed in 1880s getups and wore single action guns, we kept them loaded for business. Some our our guests had a real problem about this (some even declined to go on the tour). I began keeping newspaper clippings about stories like your's (FlatIron and just folded them in an envelope). This stuff was not info I would volunteer, but when a scared Bostonian or Canadian needed a real reason why we caried "hot" and live ammo I would break out this envelope. In all reality you would have a greater probability being shot in NYC, Toronto, or Boston than the boonies of AZ (not to mention threats from cougars and black bear from the high country in times of drought). Another aspect that I would tell them about was the fact that it would take sheriff's deputies (in ground units) 30x the response compared to cops in the cities where they live (cities that the guests live). For that reason we carried hot and some folks were petrified of us. Some aspects of the old west still remain to this day even though most of us (law abiding, non-fellon, armed US Citizens) who cherish our 2nd Ammendment, pray that we will never have to use this constitutional right.



Being Armed for Protection
I left Florida in 1977 after having my windshield shot out. Moved to western Virginia, a place you could carry a gun and nobody thought twice about.
Moved back to Florida in 2002, laws had change here drastically, but it was needed, it had gotten really bad when I left, drive by shooting and multiple drug related murders were common place. Seemed like everyone was getting robbed or mugged and the South American crime families ruled down here.
Now you can get a carry permit, do the backgroung check, take the class, wait your 5 days and you are armed and dangerous, you just don't tell anyone, and yes they're restrictions, but they are minor.
The percapita crime rate is way down from what it was. The tri-county area (Broward, Palm Beach and Miami-Dade Counties) have a full time population of over 5 million people, a half time more part-time residences plus the tourists.
Thanks to the Brady organization we have signs on all of the interstates that warn you that the residences of Florida are armed and WILL shoot you, these signs have in reality have caused the population to increase by those moving here that just want to be able to protect there families.
When I left the Everglades was a mile from my house, now it is 9 miles from that same house. No it is not receding, but being pushed to the center of the state. Now the area I use to hunt and fish in is the high rent district. You do work in those homes they have multiple gun cabinets, safes, caches of ammo, and this is not for a war that mite be coming it is to protect themselves.
We still have Panters and Bears that roam around, rattlesnakes and the dreaded Coral Snake a little colorful snake that will kill you dead as ****! Remember they call this "Paradise", what was in paradise with Adam and Eve? The serpent and with have them in abundance, and yes, we still have quite a few of the two-legged variety also

By all means by a gun to protect yourself, I am.

coolguy0621
06-26-2006, 12:58 PM
http://e.deviantart.com/emoticons/n/ninjabattle.gif

Take that GaryB

Johnnie
09-29-2006, 06:25 AM
:) [quote=Johnnie]Hello! fellow ghosttowner we can sure relate to your experience as well.

The old west legend still cireulates around the camp fires in Panamint Valley about horsemen that ride up and down Suprise Canyon around midnight.

Well when my friend Bob, and i were on that trip that took up to the top of the Panamints in my 42 milatary jeep that i wrote about a couple weeks ago, First started at the Pond at the mouth of the canyon that's where we spent the night by the pond and that night while we were sitting around our camp fire is when i told Bob, the story that i read several years before about the horsemen that always ride there horses up and down the canyon and not to be to scared because it was just a legend. But in the middle of the night we were awoke by the sound of hoofs that came from the nearby dirt road and from then on we could not get back to sleep. But at daybreak we went out onto nearby road and sure enough there in the sand was hoof prints, but later on when we told (Seldom Seen Slim) down at Ballarat, what we heard, that night by the pond in Suprise Canyon is when he chuckeled and said he had heard that same story many times before but added that it was probably a bunch of "Wild Burrows" that roam the nearby canyons and Panamint valley. Who knows for sure. So take for what it't worth, Thats our scary add-to ghost town experience.

Johnnie

Briaan10X, This posting by some of us a while back as you remember peek alot of intrest also as your posting did on Thurs.

So we are reposting it because we respect your serious question that you posted on the "other" fourm yesterday Putting all the kidding aside for a moment.:eek:

45-70Ranger
11-05-2006, 09:17 PM
You still in Southern Cal??? If so, I'd like to watch you work, and show you some of my skill too. Always fun to shoot with some one who has been around the game a while.

Hiya Coolguy0621:D
I'm sorry I didn't answer much sooner.I appologise.
Nope,haven't lived in SoCal since 1979.
The score I got, was with a Model 28 S+W Highway Patrolman 357 mag.Don't have this anymore.
Found out, the 44 mags, up to the 454 Casull, can be fun.
Where the real fun is,shooting "cowboy" 45 Colt loads.
Course, some of those loads
900 to slightly above 1000 FPS,
can be used for hunting.They are not "magnum loads", still serious loads anyway.When used with a 250gr/255gr bullet,
(semi-wadcutter) have better penetration, than a jacketed bullet of the same weight.
The recoil, especially from Black Powder, or BP substitutes
are mild, from 600 to about 800 FPS.From around the 800 to oh, 'bout 1,025/1,100 FPS, yes, you'l get recoil.Will get your attention quick.
The 45 Colt's are fun, yet can be serious when needed.
My 454 Casull,this recoil can be described as very heavy.
Was working.Not now. Our plant was closed October 30th.
My last day was October 20th.
Newly retired.
Been living in and around Modesto since about late 1979.
Now,looking forward to a move to Arizona. The move is in planning. The way things looks,
Eastern Arizona,looks good.
Not as hot in the summer. Snow,oh YES !
I never thought I'd be looking even harder at AZ.
Some pards in the "True West Magazine" forums, and the North American Hunting Club(NAHC) AZ members, with some pards here,want us to move there,too.
Will be glad to get out of Kaleefornia.
And, Tombstone is where we're headed in a few days.
Stay in touch.
See ya !

Flatiron
11-06-2006, 04:11 AM
Hey Ranger.............I've been trying to reply to your PM the other day, and can't seem to get anything to happen. The wife and I just got back from a short trip up to the White Mtns. looking for property to buy, and I can fill you in a little bit about the prices, availability and so on. Lots of beautiful land up there, but no snow on the ground at this time. I still love the smell of the pines and junipers. I'll keep trying to get a hold of you....

45-70Ranger
11-06-2006, 12:47 PM
Flatiron,:)
It's always good to hear from ya ! Sounds like you're in good spirits too ! Great !!
E-mail is good.
Might be a software problem.
Might have to delete cookies,history and files.Sometimes, those things sure do accumilate quick.Slow things down to a crawl.Causes all sorts of problems.
Try using a registry cleaner.
Was checking out an unfinished house.About $35-39 K. More in my price range.
Will PM ya again.
See ya !

takurpic
12-14-2006, 09:45 PM
Wow! Great discussion folks. Out here, most folks know how to use a gun. We're in the country- it's expected. Plus, we fianlly got CCW here despite the Gov's (D) veto. ;)

takurpic
12-15-2006, 06:51 AM
One more thing... there was a link a ways back to Mad Ogre's website. He's not too fond the .223/5.56mm round or the M16/AR15.

I made this video a couple of years ago to demonstrate what a 223 does to various targets at a distance of about 50 feet.

Here's the link... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQpcIfhkTyI

Airborne Ranger
01-31-2007, 06:52 PM
Ironically, I was on my way from Sierra Vista to Tombstone going up Charleston Road, very near to Millville and Brunckow's Cabin when about 8-10 illegals came out of the brush and started piling into a white truck. Very startling and unsettling to say the least. They also nearly caused an accident because the other two cars in front of me slammed on their brakes in reaction.

So in addition to the indigenous dangers, there are other ones out there. Everyone is talking about carrying firearms; I would ensure that you have a concealed carry permit. Many Western States have reciprocity agreements, but carrying a weapon during air travel in checked luggage is problematic. For my trip out west, I carried a leatherman and a 12 inch expandable baton. I also carried a cell phone with Roam capability. There were few areas even in remote parts of Arizona where I did not get a good signal.

I would pay attention to the No Trespassing and No Vehicle signs. Most of the places I have seen under BLM control do have parking areas where it seemed safe to park.

If nothing else, ensure that when you do leave the vehicle that you leave nothing in the open that would tempt a passerby.

brian10x
02-01-2007, 02:28 PM
In Arizona, open carry is legal without any type of permit for residents.

Myself, and most of the AZ explorers I know just strap on the the ole' hogleg any time we go out in the desert.

I see a lot of illegals, also, and while most are peaceful (albiet lawbreakers), you just can never be too prepared.

Heck, I usually have my shotgun in the jeep, too. (But, then, I'm a gun nut)

Of course, I am sensitive to the feelings of my unarmed friends, and suggest the following sign be afixed in a prominent location somewhere on their vehicle. (In several languages of course)

bad bob
02-01-2007, 04:41 PM
Hmmm, please stop beatin' around the bush Brian...it's better if ya jes come right out with it!:D
bb.

David A. Wright
03-17-2007, 06:08 PM
Only place I got the heebie-jeebies was at Barker Ranch, in the Panamint Range in Inyo County, CA. The ranch is notorious as the location of the capture of Charlie Manson.

I was riding with a Death Valley National Park ranger, along with a BLM ranger, one day in the NPS Ford Bronco. The ranger decided to check out Barker Ranch.

I've been to the ranch many times, but this time there was a vehicle there and someone was camping in the main building, which I had seen numerous times before. But this time my hair was standing on edge immediately after I got out of the NPS vehicle.

A man came out of the ranch house, we could hear a woman inside. I don't know what it was about this guy, but his body language was sending red flags into my brain. He was doing nothing outwardly threatening, but I decided I best get back into the Bronco.

The ranger also must have sensed something, as he subtlely kept his sidearm covered with his hand the entire time he spoke with the man.

It's amazing how gun culture has changed in past decades. In the 1970s and early 1980s I lived in a small resort town in the eastern Sierra Nevada near the Nevada border, and used to keep a Winchester 30.30 lever action, a Mossburg Defender and a fishing rod in the gun rack in my truck. The guns and rod were in there 24/7 and I never locked the truck. No one ever seemed to care (most of the locals had a gun or two in their vehicles anyway for plinking or hunting in season).

In California, thanks to the politicians, spank your child - go to jail. Manufacture and sell drugs to kids, get a slap on the wrist. And take your 4x4 on what used to be a public road, get shot by a Eco-Nazi ... :mad:

High Desert Drifter
03-17-2007, 06:32 PM
I live in California and have all my life. You know something is wrong when someone can sue you for falling down your stairs while breaking in to your house.

This is probably why I love to explore in Nevada. I can unload my atv on public land, strap on my 40cal. sig. and head out in to the wide open. no one ever bothers me.

of course I have heard stories about wierd groups of people taking over areas and claiming them for themselves. Such is the case a few years back when I was warned by a Virginia City Local to stay clear of American Canyon...

roswell50
03-17-2007, 06:47 PM
Ironically, I was on my way from Sierra Vista to Tombstone going up Charleston Road, very near to Millville and Brunckow's Cabin when about 8-10 illegals came out of the brush and started piling into a white truck. Very startling and unsettling to say the least. They also nearly caused an accident because the other two cars in front of me slammed on their brakes in reaction.

So in addition to the indigenous dangers, there are other ones out there. Everyone is talking about carrying firearms; I would ensure that you have a concealed carry permit. Many Western States have reciprocity agreements, but carrying a weapon during air travel in checked luggage is problematic. For my trip out west, I carried a leatherman and a 12 inch expandable baton. I also carried a cell phone with Roam capability. There were few areas even in remote parts of Arizona where I did not get a good signal.

I would pay attention to the No Trespassing and No Vehicle signs. Most of the places I have seen under BLM control do have parking areas where it seemed safe to park.

If nothing else, ensure that when you do leave the vehicle that you leave nothing in the open that would tempt a passerby.
Thanks for the info and your personal experiences.

Bison Dave
03-22-2007, 02:36 PM
A few years ago my brother and I were in Montana Ghost Towning. After spending the day exploring by vehicle and on foot we set up our tent, had dinner and hit the hay. Long after dark, we both awoke to a vehicle engine running a short ways off, their headlights were trained right on our tent. For what seemed like forever, they just set there with their engine running and lights on, after a number of minutes they slowly drove off. The next morning we checked the tracks and they had purposefully pointed their vehicle (probably a truck) so they could view our camp. believe me it took awhile to get back to sleep again! The area we were in was not private property or posted in any way. It pays to be careful wherever you are!
Bison Dave

LauraA
03-22-2007, 06:58 PM
Since we're out on the trails Jeepng and hiking at least a couple of times a week, we're more concerned with possibility of accidentally stumbling upon pot farms. It's been a problem in the Tonto National Forest as well as other public lands across the country. Most of these pot farms are guarded by extremely well-armed thugs. The rangers issue warnings, for all the good that does, once you've found the farm, I suspect it would be too late to be careful.



Your National Forest - Newsroom (http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/tonto/news/102306.shtml)

danbo
03-23-2007, 07:16 AM
You never know who you will run into when you are "out there".
South of Boise, there is/was an abandoned Atlas 2 ICBM
complex. Google earth - 43* 20' 45.18 x 115* 59' 35.94
( Don't EVEN think of going there, as the current
owner will detain you at gun point and turn you over to the Ada
Co. Shariff. ) Yes, that happened to me! Anyway back in the
80's you could explore and play in this place. There are 3 main
silos, 50' wide and ten stories deep. There are also underground
barracks, maintanance bays and control rooms etc. One day,
me and my buddies were beginning to decend the main stair
case into the complex. We were bristling with every piece of
shooting iron that we owned. We noticed that around 4 stories
below us, 5 guys were comming up the same stair case. We
thought they were soldiers. They were wearing BDUs and
maroon berets. As we passed each other, we noticed they had
pony tails, beards, mp5's and other assorted asault weapons.
We were nervous, they were quiet. One of our party said howdy,
nice weather. The lead guy smiles and nodded. We passed each
other quietly, within inches of each other. We never saw them
again. I still have know clue who they were and I prefer to keep
it that way. I'm reminded of the bumper sticker that says,
"an armed society is a polite society". Very true.

mainmanwalkin
05-08-2007, 06:34 PM
The only times I've felt particularily unwelcomed and uneasy were in the ghost towns of Sun City and Island Grove, Florida.

Sun City, FL on the website is listed as having only a few trailers in the area and an old abandoned gas station and electric building. However, is now full of old trailers inhabited by small town rednecks who dont look kindly upon out-of-towners driving around the area. The gas station is now someone's house, and the electric building is now supposedly an auction house, although I got the impression there was a lot more going on in that place. My girlfriend and I drove thru there around 2pm on a weekday, but it wasn't like anyone was gone for the day at work. There were plenty of locals staring and scowling at us as we drove past. Who knows what's going on in that place, but I sure didnt want to stick around to find out.

Island Grove was the one place I thought I might need to defend myself with a weapon. As soon as we drove into town this white van drove up behind us and followed us for a block or so down the road. As we crossed the railroad tracks in town the white van drove past us again. We turned onto a side street and once again the white van drove past us. It stopped at a house aways up, and an old man got out. We figured that was his house, but a mere 5 minutes later he got back in the van and drove towards us again. As he drove past he slowed down, then stopped ahead of us on the street. At this point I opened my backpack in the backseat and got my 38 ready. The last thing I'd want to do is get into a gunfight with a crazed old man, but you never know what might happen. Anyhow, he decided to keep going and parked in the driveway of another house up the street. We stayed where we were and watched him sit in his van there for a few minutes before driving away. We then continued to tour the town area, seeing all sorts of run down, dirty looking houses, beat up cars, and some beergutted rednecks with weird looks in their eyes. And then, once again, the white van showed up behind us and passed us on the road. At this point we decided just to get out of town. As we were driving the last stretch of road in that little 3 street town we heard two distinct shotgun blasts. We were outta there!

bad bob
05-08-2007, 07:44 PM
The only times I've felt particularily unwelcomed and uneasy were in the ghost towns of Sun City and Island Grove, Florida.


Island Grove was the one place I thought I might need to defend myself with a weapon. As soon as we drove into town this white van drove up behind us and followed us for a block or so down the road. As we crossed the railroad tracks in town the white van drove past us again. We turned onto a side street and once again the white van drove past us. It stopped at a house aways up, and an old man got out. We figured that was his house, but a mere 5 minutes later he got back in the van and drove towards us again. As he drove past he slowed down, then stopped ahead of us on the street. At this point I opened my backpack in the backseat and got my 38 ready. The last thing I'd want to do is get into a gunfight with a crazed old man, but you never know what might happen. Anyhow, he decided to keep going and parked in the driveway of another house up the street. We stayed where we were and watched him sit in his van there for a few minutes before driving away. We then continued to tour the town area, seeing all sorts of run down, dirty looking houses, beat up cars, and some beergutted rednecks with weird looks in their eyes. And then, once again, the white van showed up behind us and passed us on the road. At this point we decided just to get out of town. As we were driving the last stretch of road in that little 3 street town we heard two distinct shotgun blasts. We were outta there!


Brian B10X.
Opportunity knocks so very rarely in most cases anymore. Here is a chance for ya to test your new 305mm that ya recently acquired from Austria.

Course now schlepping that peach to Florida may be a bit difficult, but I have provided a possible option, using the RR as a conveyance worth your consideration. :)

brian10x
05-08-2007, 08:10 PM
Yeah, like you said, but the ammunition is so darned expensive!

speedy
05-09-2007, 06:30 AM
Can you imagine the size of the gun belt?

GaryB
05-09-2007, 09:37 AM
Can you imagine the size of the gun belt?


Can you imagine the size of the dies for reloading?

LauraA
05-09-2007, 03:04 PM
Can you imagine the size of the gun belt?


Can you imagine the size of the dies for reloading?

It's okay fellas, size doesn't matter. :p :D



my bad...forgive me.:o

brian10x
05-09-2007, 07:14 PM
Can you imagine the size of the dies for reloading?

Can you imagine seating the primers? (Inside joke for ammunition reloaders)

GaryB
05-10-2007, 08:07 AM
Can you imagine seating the primers? (Inside joke for ammunition reloaders)


Something tells me you couldn't pick up a box of Hornaday's at Bass Pro Shops either.

Ghost Toon
07-16-2007, 03:09 PM
After reading this thread I couldn't sleep at all last nite. When ever I do get around to checking out some ghost towns I am definitely going to get a gun and bring along friends...with guns.

mainmanwalkin
07-20-2007, 09:47 PM
After reading this thread I couldn't sleep at all last nite. When ever I do get around to checking out some ghost towns I am definitely going to get a gun and bring along friends...with guns.

Ghost Toons, dont let this scare you away from going out ghost-town hunting. I've been to about 50 different sites in the past two years and by far most of them are not dangerous at all. I've found that usually either no one is around or there may be residents nearby but you never even see them. It IS good though to use common sense and have some sort of defense and escape plan for the one or two bad apples you find along the way. Remember, these dangerous town stories are the exceptions. Including my latest one about Port Tampa

mainmanwalkin
07-20-2007, 10:22 PM
Have a new one to add to the list: Port Tampa, Florida. The site shows pictures of some very nice stately homes, fully upkept and in great condition. These are places that housed Teddy Roosevelt and some of his Rough Riders prior to embarking on the Spanish-American war. However, Port Tampa also has a significant number of unkept and not so nice looking homes right there, plus a huge roving gang in the immediate area. Maybe it was the fact that we were there in the late afternoon on the 4th of July, but the streets were crawling with very shady looking kids, to put it nicely. We passed the library and the boarded up building pictured on the site, then decided to zip out of town due to the growing presence of possible drug dealers and users. We thought we'd just drive down Interbay street for a moment longer, and we did see a few of the 1890's mansions, but also right past these houses heading straight towards us was a huge street gang. And that was it for Port Tampa. It's a shame that these impressive looking old houses are now stuck right in the middle of a what has now become a ghetto filled with thugs and druggies. But for my part, we knew better than to leave the car and get out to take pictures, or stay in the area once we knew there was danger. An agreement we made when we started taking these trips was that if we got to a ghost town that was in a bad area, we would just keep on going. I was interested in seeing alot more of Port Tampa than we got to, but no ghost town, no matter what might be there, is worth putting your life and safety at risk.

Gravelrash
08-29-2007, 04:36 AM
Hi. I'm a new member from Australia, planning to travel the USA in '08.
First thing, can I say how great this site is, full of really (REALLY) useful information which I will be taking advantage of.
However, some of the threads have raised a few questions, and then I saw the thread "Dangerous Ghost Towns" which seemed to deal with some of the issues that interest me.
So I hope you will all indulge me and share your vast experience of the American wilderness.
First, a bit of preamble:
I'll start of by saying I am quite an experienced "bushman". (We call forests "the bush" over here). I have a lot of miles and (far too) many years of getting out in the boonies. I know my way around a campsite and I'm not the type to be panicked or spooked easily.
I spent 10 years living in Thailand, which was an adventure beyond description, but it has highlighted a problem that I am sure I will experience in America - lack of familiarity.
Here in Oz, as you probably know, we have a lot of venomous and highly aggresive snakes. I grew up with them and they do not fill me with fear - I respect them. Like anywhere, it's a matter of familiarity, knowing the habits and nature of the wildlife. I understood Aussie snakes pretty well.
However, when I landed in up-country Thailand, it was a whole different kettle of fish. Many, many snakes, (even in the house!!!) and I didn't know their habits at all, which left me feeling very foolish and vulnerable...., often!!! You don't want to second guess a Cobra! Most of the snakes I encountered I didn't even know the name for, let alone how they behaved.
I expect the same will be the case in America.
The one thing that many ghost town and outdoor websites have in common is stories of Rattlesnake encounters. I have no idea what to expect, but I DO KNOW that I will be in many areas where Rattlers are in big numbers.
So, my first questions are about Rattlers.
Are they aggressive or passive? Are they nocturnal? Do they have an interest in campsites and food?
Are they camouflage predators, lying in wait or are they open hunters, on the move?
I know they are fast strikers, but are they fast on the ground? Are they into fight or flight?
On some of the threads here I've come across these comments:
"Look at the news: coydog ,coyote attacks, cougars and bears."
"The adults HAVE to know what to do under threat, whether it's bears, or road bandits."
I suppose coyotes and coydogs are not too much of a problem, but cougars and bears!!! I'm totally ignorant of both.
So, Question 2 - how do you handle yourself in Bear Country?? Ditto for big cats. Is bear spray 100% effective? Is it true that staying still is the best defense or do you get on yer bike and scram as fast as possible? Will a bear pursue? How far?
Cougars: Are they aggressive or shy?
Question 3 is a bit of topic, but....
"a BLM ranger............Most of the places I have seen under BLM control do have parking areas "
What is BLM???

Q 4: "...take your 4x4 on what used to be a public road, get shot by a Eco-Nazi "
We have Greenie d&ckh*^ds in Oz, who want to shut people out of the bush and our Park rangers are fools of the same stripe, but this sounds like it's gone to a whole other level. Any advise, input,info?
Q 5: "of course I have heard stories about wierd groups of people taking over areas and claiming them for themselves. Such is the case a few years back when I was warned by a Virginia City Local to stay clear of American Canyon..."
Is this sort of thing common? BTW, what happens/happened in American Canyon (and where is it)
Q 6:
In Australia it is still the norm to camp wherever you feel like it, within reason. There are millions and millions of acres of wilderness, so camping "as it takes you" is considered normal. I have been learning that this is not the case in America. True? Is it still possible to find a nice spot and set up for the night? Or are Rangers all over you?
I have no intention of flouting US law, but I'd like to know in advance what is possible. I really don't like crowded campsites at all.
I know this is a long series of questions, but I'd appreciate any replies I get. I'll buy you a beer when I get there!

LauraA
08-29-2007, 06:43 AM
Welcome to the forum Gravelrash!
Here are a few links which might help to answer a few of your questions.
Since there are so many different kinds of rattlers, depending on the areas you plan to visit, you can look up info on them here. Each variety seems to have its own temperament American International Rattlesnake Museum - Albuquerque, New Mexico (http://www.rattlesnakes.com/core.html)
...and here's BLM's (Bureau of Land Management) site, along with the US Forest Service. Rules are different depending on which agency manages the land you're visiting. Most maps will tell you if you're on BLM or Forest Service land.

Bureau of Land Management (http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en.html)

USDA Forest Service - Caring for the land and serving people. (http://www.fs.fed.us/)

I hope this little bit of information helps you. Please keep us posted on your adventures. :)

Gravelrash
08-29-2007, 06:59 AM
Laura - thanks for that. It's late, nearly midnight, and I've strained my eyes to the max reading all the posts here, so I'll read myself rich concerning Rattlesnakes tomorrow. Appreciated!

bad bob
08-29-2007, 09:13 AM
Great to see ya made it over here from the other site, Gravel. Jes make sure yer "seatbelt" is secure. :)

Goat
08-29-2007, 04:14 PM
Welcome Gravelrash,

I understand your concerns about travelling in the American desert, and like many things that you read or hear, it's not 100% accurate.

1. Rattlesnakes are usually well camouflaged, and generally (but not always) are not really aggressive. They seem to be out and about closer to sunrise and sunset, and tend to hang around shady spots as the day progresses. They ARE pretty active around water sources, and care should be taken when near water. You should also note the sides of washes carefully, and the green trees that grow in the washes as these areas are natural habitats for unpleasant critters.

2. Coyotes aren't a problem, but may eat or fornicate with your dog. Mountain Lions are very hard to spot, but you should be aware that they are around and you may be in their territory. As far as bears go...lets just say that a good firearm is the best protection from all of the above.

3. BLM guys generally stay near the crowded, easily accessible areas.

4. I can't say that I've ever encountered a militant Eco-Nazi, but I'm generally friendly and courteous (yet oddly suspicious of?) to whomever I meet on the trail.

5. These groups are out there, and if I encounter an area that raises my suspicions, I give it a wide berth. I don't know what they are up to, and don't care.

6. Unless it's with a group of people that I know, I camp in the middle of nowhere, and I've never been hassled.


It's really in your best interest to be armed, as a firearm is a valuable tool when far from the urban areas. It's also a good idea to have a dog with you, as well.

Finally, your research assignment is....SCORPIONS!!!

Goat

Gravelrash
08-30-2007, 06:30 AM
Ah yes! Scorpions!! Didn't think of that.
I'm going to buy a second hand pickup or wagon that I can sleep in the back of, so I won't have to worry about them getting in my sleeping bag. (I hope!)

That is just the sort of advice I was after, about rattlesnakes. It's basically what I thought, but as you appreciate, new environment, new realities! Better to ask and feel silly, than not to ask and wind up dead, hey!?
(Actually, I am hoping to see at least ONE!)

A major bummer for me is that I won't be able to bring my dog, (quarantine laws) so maybe the coyotes are safe! You wouldn't mess with "Whiskey"!

Bears - I only discovered a few years ago that they are man-eaters!!! Don't usually have to worry about that problem with kangaroos! I'd love to be armed, but as I'll be on a tourist visa, I doubt I could carry one legally. (BUT, I'm open to suggestions!) I tell you no lie, I really envy you and your Second Ammendment. Very strict controls here.
I have an itinerary loosely mapped out, and it gets me up in the boonies as much as I can manage it and by all reports I'll be in bear country often, so I guess I'll be doing a bit more reading!
Do bears get down into Arizona??

I don't have any great worries about encounters out on the trail, as I am an amputee who lives in a wheelchair, so no hiking for me. I'll be driving everywhere, or not going at all!It's just my night camps I am concerned about.

4. I can't say that I've ever encountered a militant Eco-Nazi, but I'm generally friendly and courteous (yet oddly suspicious of?) to whomever I meet on the trail.

That's how it is for me too, friendly but suspiscious. I want company, I'll holler for rent-a-crowd!

5. These groups are out there, and if I encounter an area that raises my suspicions, I give it a wide berth. I don't know what they are up to, and don't care.

This kinda intrigues me more than worries me. I was googlearthing Death Valley and came upon the Barker Ranch, haunt of Charlie Manson.... got me thinking about some other stories I've heard about goings-on in the great American outdoors!

I really appreciate you taking the time to give me such detailed answers. Hope I can do likewise if you ever venture over this way.

Gravelrash
08-30-2007, 06:43 AM
Great to see ya made it over here from the other site, Gravel. Jes make sure yer "seatbelt" is secure. :)
G'day Bob! Bad??? These sites have been a real God-send, let me tell ya. As it's going to be a "once in a lifetime trip", I don't want to waste time, or worse, have some sort of avoidable disaster that eats up all my travel time, so the info I've been getting here is priceless. Nothing better than the voice of experience.
When I lived in Thailand I used to see unprepared travellers having really shitty things happen to them that a bit of preparation and research would have avoided.
That's 2 beers I'll have to buy now. This could get interesting! I've had a fantasy about a night in a Mexican cantina for years!
I found this place in Montana called The Cowboy Bar - high on my list of places I have to visit!

Bonneville Mariner
08-30-2007, 08:37 AM
Whereabouts do you plan to explore here? Different areas, of course, mean different climates, cultures, and wildlife.

I have spent 30 years roaming the deserts and forests of this fine state. I have never been armed, though that's not to say I wouldn't be more comfortable if I was armed (though I do carry a machete). I've never run into anybody strange or hostile. I say this because, as a foreign tourist, you won't be able to legally carry a firearm.

Find out if the area you want to explore is private property. If it is, find out who owns it and ask permission. Many, many ghost towns are on private property. I've never been denied permission to explore one.

I've never seen a bear or a mountain lion in the wild. I have seen coyotes, but none have ever tried to eat or have its way with my dog.

I follow a pretty strict "no tent" policy when camping in the desert (mostly because I hate putting up and taking down tents). Usually we just lay out a tarp and sleep under the stars. Never had a problem with scorpions getting anywhere near us.

If you're going to the mountains, just take the precaution of using a bear bag to store your food.

That's Utah, and could probably be applied to most of Nevada, Idaho, Colorado, and Wyoming as well.

The lower Southwest is another thing. The American South is yet another (by the way, I just published an article about exploring in the swamps of Louisiana on my website, www.bonnevillemariner.com (http://www.bonnevillemariner.com), if you're interested. There's also some stories about ghost towns in Utah and Nevada there.

Gravelrash
08-30-2007, 09:02 PM
Bonneville Mariner, thanks for that info. I am getting the picture - just behave with respect for the wildlife, same as you do back home. I've been reading a fair bit about rattlers and now, armed with some "local knowledge", I reckon I am on an equal footing but I was still a bit apprehensive about bears - don't know why, I've never seen one! LOL
Anyway, your bit about never having seen one in the wild is good to know. However, a few more packs of bear spray go into the kitbag!
I'm with you on the "no tent" policy. I'll be sleeping in the back of a pickup or van. I need to do that because, being an amputee, I need things to be at a reasonable height. Try lying down on the ground with one foot raised, and you'll see what I mean!

My itinerary is still a bit open ended, with a fair bit depending on how soon my business sells, affecting which season I will arrive in..... and the plans my wife has for the money!!
I've got a very good mate in Arizona who is going to take time off work so we can "do" Arizona/New Mexico. He has a cabin on the Mogollon Rim - brilliant!! So, I will either fly in to Phoenix and start from there or plan #2 is to fly in to Seattle, buy a vehicle there, drive across to Glacier National Park and then slowly filter my way down through Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and then Arizona. I can't get enough of the Rockies.

I am planning on approx. 2 weeks per state which will give me a bit of time to get into California as well, which fits in with my wife and daughter's plans. They have no interest at all in Ghost Towns (can you believe it!!) but a LOT of interest in shopping, so LA and SanFran are high on their lists of priorities. We have a friend who lives in Malibu, so she has become the "designated shopper". Good luck to them all! I want to go to Death Valley and Yosemite so I might just drop them off and pick 'em up when I'm done!
I will be applying for a job at U of New Mexico also, and the timing of their application procedure/process is also a factor that will influence my itinerary.
I sure do hope I have the opportunity to meet up with some of ypu friendly folk. Already I can say, it would be an honor. First round is on me.

brian10x
08-31-2007, 02:20 AM
"Coyotes aren't a problem, but may eat or fornicate with your dog."

Oh, no,no, man I'm going to have nightmares all night now.

Rockcrusher
08-31-2007, 10:17 PM
Gravelrash . . .
I just read your post and maybe I can put your questions in perspective since I've quite a bit of time wheeling and going walkabout in your wild west . . . WA that is.

About the Rattlesnakes
Rattlers, although potentially dangerous, are generally pretty shy. They're pit vipers and usually hunt for their dinner at night. They will hide out during the heat of the day. You'll rarely see them in the cold months . . . October, November on thru to March or April. Given the choice of an encounter between a King Brown or a Rattler, I'll take the Rattler thank you very much. I'll choose a whole herd of Rattlers over a Taipan (I've only seen one of those and it was in a cage. My Abo mate told me they were very bad news.)

On Bear country . . . and Mountain Lions
Bears are opportunists, that is to say if they sniff out what they think will be a meal, they'll go after it. Most of the time they can be frightened away. The major exception will be a sow with cubs. Mountain Lions are a different story. They are predators, plain and simple. The good news is they're solitary animals. I've seen 3 or 4 in 30 years of floundering around in the desert. 30 or 40 of them have probably seen me in the same time.

Militant EcoNazis, 4×4's & public roads
I wouldn't worry about them . . . At least not here in Nevada. They have been known to boobytrap motorcycle trails but that shouldn't affect you. As for roads open to travel, stop at the local BLM or Forest Service office and ask for a Motor Vehicle Use Map for the area. Those folks will generally be more than willing to help you out.

Weird groups . . .
I've run across those all over the world . . . Even in WA. Best defense I've found is to backtrack and get the hêll outta Dodge. As for Virginia City and American Flat, I live about 10 4×4 trail miles (or 2½ hours) from there and I've never had a problem going over the mountain into VC. BTW, the 25 mile trip to VC on the pavement takes 40 minutes.

Camping
Pretty much the same as Oz. Again, stop at the local BLM or Forest Service office to find out if there are any local closures or restrictions. The main reason for closure or restriction will be due to extreme fire danger. As we speak, most of the western U.S. is in severe drought so no open fires are allowed on public land.

Other crawly critters.
We got a bunch that bite and/or sting . . . Some poisonous, some not. Almost none are fatal unless you have an allergic reaction.

If you have any more questions, PM me and I'll give you a real email address.

Gravelrash
09-01-2007, 06:48 AM
Rockcrusher, g'day and many thanks for that info. All good stuff and very helpful. I've figured that rattlers are very similar to our Death Adder, another pit viper, which I understand well, so I'm sure I won't have any dramas.

Bears and Mountain Lions ~ well, that's another reason why I love America! You guys have some country there! (I wish more Americans appreciated it. I read a lot of stuff that makes me wonder why you aren't using the Second Amendment to better advantage!)
I have to admit to a fascination with both, and I am really hoping to see some, but preferably from behind glass

Militant EcoNazis, 4×4's & public roads, Weird groups . .
probably just like our ferals! Ar*#holes with hair, attitude and no soap. No worries.

I've never been to W.A. It always seemed like aforeign land, not part of Australia. It used to be cheaper to fly to Bangkok than it was to fly to Perth, so I've never been! Probably just full of aussies anyway!
Were you in the mining game? W.A is booming at the moment - land of opportunity, so they say.
Again. many thanks for the info. I'll definately PM if anything else arises.
See you there!

ghost_town_huntress
09-01-2007, 02:15 PM
First, about the rattlers. I've only come across one rattler in my explorations. They're generally shy and tend to try to get away from people rather than fight. The way people get bitten by rattlers is by getting too close, whether on purpose or by accident, and not backing off after it rattles its tail. Rattlers do usually give ample warning before striking. So usually it's the foolish people that get rattler bites. The Mojave rattlers are the deadliest. There are one or two types of rattlers that are more aggressive than the rest, but if I recall right, they live in the southeast US. The water moccasins are another snake you want to avoid in the eastern US.
On to the coyotes, coydogs, cougars and bears. First of all, you don't need to be too worried about the coyotes. They for the most part stay away from people and they won't hurt much, if anything. For the cougars and bears, just make sure you carry protection (my protection of choice is my Baby Eagle). In most places you can get away with carrying it on your hip or shoulder, but if you don't have a concealed carry permit, make sure it's in plain sight, not concealed. Make sure you stay away from airports, courthouses, jails or anywhere where it's posted no firearms. Cougar and bear attacks you shouldn't be too worried about because they're so few and far between. We just had our first fatal bear attack here in Utah this year. Either way, don't run or they will chase. Fast movement automatically sets them into prey drive.
I would be more worried about the freaks and grumpy landowners than cougars and bears. Even then, I haven't had any bad experiences yet with freaks or grumpy landowners, but I'm sure it's just a matter of time. Just make sure you stay off private property and if someone still bothers you, again, that's why it's a good idea to carry protection.
As for camping, you can camp pretty much anywhere on BLM (Bureau of Land Management is what it stands for) land because it's public land. Make sure you follow their rules, especially fire restrictions. Again, stay away from private property. There are also public campsites where you can pay a fee, usually from $8-12 dollars per night to camp. However, if you come out my way to Utah, you're welcome to camp out on our 80 acres by Duchesne, just let us know when you'd like to camp out there. If you have any more questions, feel free to email me.

Rachel in Utah ghost_town_huntress@yahoo.com
Hi. I'm a new member from Australia, planning to travel the USA in '08.
First thing, can I say how great this site is, full of really (REALLY) useful information which I will be taking advantage of.
However, some of the threads have raised a few questions, and then I saw the thread "Dangerous Ghost Towns" which seemed to deal with some of the issues that interest me.
So I hope you will all indulge me and share your vast experience of the American wilderness.
First, a bit of preamble:
I'll start of by saying I am quite an experienced "bushman". (We call forests "the bush" over here). I have a lot of miles and (far too) many years of getting out in the boonies. I know my way around a campsite and I'm not the type to be panicked or spooked easily.
I spent 10 years living in Thailand, which was an adventure beyond description, but it has highlighted a problem that I am sure I will experience in America - lack of familiarity.
Here in Oz, as you probably know, we have a lot of venomous and highly aggresive snakes. I grew up with them and they do not fill me with fear - I respect them. Like anywhere, it's a matter of familiarity, knowing the habits and nature of the wildlife. I understood Aussie snakes pretty well.
However, when I landed in up-country Thailand, it was a whole different kettle of fish. Many, many snakes, (even in the house!!!) and I didn't know their habits at all, which left me feeling very foolish and vulnerable...., often!!! You don't want to second guess a Cobra! Most of the snakes I encountered I didn't even know the name for, let alone how they behaved.
I expect the same will be the case in America.
The one thing that many ghost town and outdoor websites have in common is stories of Rattlesnake encounters. I have no idea what to expect, but I DO KNOW that I will be in many areas where Rattlers are in big numbers.
So, my first questions are about Rattlers.
Are they aggressive or passive? Are they nocturnal? Do they have an interest in campsites and food?
Are they camouflage predators, lying in wait or are they open hunters, on the move?
I know they are fast strikers, but are they fast on the ground? Are they into fight or flight?
On some of the threads here I've come across these comments:
"Look at the news: coydog ,coyote attacks, cougars and bears."
"The adults HAVE to know what to do under threat, whether it's bears, or road bandits."
I suppose coyotes and coydogs are not too much of a problem, but cougars and bears!!! I'm totally ignorant of both.
So, Question 2 - how do you handle yourself in Bear Country?? Ditto for big cats. Is bear spray 100% effective? Is it true that staying still is the best defense or do you get on yer bike and scram as fast as possible? Will a bear pursue? How far?
Cougars: Are they aggressive or shy?
Question 3 is a bit of topic, but....
"a BLM ranger............Most of the places I have seen under BLM control do have parking areas "
What is BLM???

Q 4: "...take your 4x4 on what used to be a public road, get shot by a Eco-Nazi "
We have Greenie d&ckh*^ds in Oz, who want to shut people out of the bush and our Park rangers are fools of the same stripe, but this sounds like it's gone to a whole other level. Any advise, input,info?
Q 5: "of course I have heard stories about wierd groups of people taking over areas and claiming them for themselves. Such is the case a few years back when I was warned by a Virginia City Local to stay clear of American Canyon..."
Is this sort of thing common? BTW, what happens/happened in American Canyon (and where is it)
Q 6:
In Australia it is still the norm to camp wherever you feel like it, within reason. There are millions and millions of acres of wilderness, so camping "as it takes you" is considered normal. I have been learning that this is not the case in America. True? Is it still possible to find a nice spot and set up for the night? Or are Rangers all over you?
I have no intention of flouting US law, but I'd like to know in advance what is possible. I really don't like crowded campsites at all.
I know this is a long series of questions, but I'd appreciate any replies I get. I'll buy you a beer when I get there!

ghost_town_huntress
09-01-2007, 02:17 PM
Oh yeah, and about that beer, I'll pass, but I'll take a good Captain and Coke!

Rachel in Utah ghost_town_huntress@yahoo.com
First, about the rattlers. I've only come across one rattler in my explorations. They're generally shy and tend to try to get away from people rather than fight. The way people get bitten by rattlers is by getting too close, whether on purpose or by accident, and not backing off after it rattles its tail. Rattlers do usually give ample warning before striking. So usually it's the foolish people that get rattler bites. The Mojave rattlers are the deadliest. There are one or two types of rattlers that are more aggressive than the rest, but if I recall right, they live in the southeast US. The water moccasins are another snake you want to avoid in the eastern US.
On to the coyotes, coydogs, cougars and bears. First of all, you don't need to be too worried about the coyotes. They for the most part stay away from people and they won't hurt much, if anything. For the cougars and bears, just make sure you carry protection (my protection of choice is my Baby Eagle). In most places you can get away with carrying it on your hip or shoulder, but if you don't have a concealed carry permit, make sure it's in plain sight, not concealed. Make sure you stay away from airports, courthouses, jails or anywhere where it's posted no firearms. Cougar and bear attacks you shouldn't be too worried about because they're so few and far between. We just had our first fatal bear attack here in Utah this year. Either way, don't run or they will chase. Fast movement automatically sets them into prey drive.
I would be more worried about the freaks and grumpy landowners than cougars and bears. Even then, I haven't had any bad experiences yet with freaks or grumpy landowners, but I'm sure it's just a matter of time. Just make sure you stay off private property and if someone still bothers you, again, that's why it's a good idea to carry protection.
As for camping, you can camp pretty much anywhere on BLM (Bureau of Land Management is what it stands for) land because it's public land. Make sure you follow their rules, especially fire restrictions. Again, stay away from private property. There are also public campsites where you can pay a fee, usually from $8-12 dollars per night to camp. However, if you come out my way to Utah, you're welcome to camp out on our 80 acres by Duchesne, just let us know when you'd like to camp out there. If you have any more questions, feel free to email me.

Rachel in Utah ghost_town_huntress@yahoo.com

Gravelrash
09-01-2007, 06:24 PM
Rachel, thanks very much for taking the time to help me out. It's much appreciated.


As for camping, you can camp pretty much anywhere on BLM (Bureau of Land Management is what it stands for) land because it's public land. Make sure you follow their rules, especially fire restrictions. Again, stay away from private property. There are also public campsites where you can pay a fee, usually from $8-12 dollars per night to camp.

That BLM info is great. I don't like paying for campsites too much, except the ones that have shower facilities!


However, if you come out my way to Utah, you're welcome to camp out on our 80 acres by Duchesne, just let us know when you'd like to camp out there.

That's a great offer, very generous, and I'll more than likely take you up on it!!
Two questions remain!!

(my protection of choice is my Baby Eagle).
I'm assuming this is something to do with your fabulous Second Ammendment? (Readers must be getting the idea now - that I am very envious of that part of American freedom!)


I'll take a good Captain and Coke
The Coke I know. What's a Captain? I actually seldom drink (anymore) but it would be a pleasure to watch a sunset with a jar and a few friends.
****, this business better sell soon! I'm looking forward to this trip more than any other I've ever undertaken. It's been a lifelong dream.....and now its starting to take shape.
Many thanks again, for the info.
Pete

Gravelrash
09-01-2007, 06:26 PM
That wasn't the "f" word.... it was d-a - - m-n!

Rockcrusher
09-01-2007, 08:33 PM
. . . I've never been to W.A. It always seemed like a foreign land, not part of Australia. It used to be cheaper to fly to Bangkok than it was to fly to Perth, so I've never been! Probably just full of aussies anyway!
Were you in the mining game? W.A is booming at the moment - land of opportunity, so they say.
Again. many thanks for the info. I'll definately PM if anything else arises.
See you there!

I can relate to the foreign country thing. I once hit customs in Sydney with too many cigs. The nice lady asked where I was going and I told her Northwest Cape. After a 20 minute conference with the rest of the customs folks she came back and apologised that I had to go to "That place". She let me keep my cigs and sent me on my way.

No mining for me . . . Too much like work. I used to spend 3, maybe 4 months a year at the joint RAN/USN base on Northwest Cape. Had a quite a few side trips over to Woomera and Pine Gap. That was during the 80's and early 90's when I was based out of the Phillippines.

Oh yeah, I think most everyone in WA kept their guns.

40FORDJIM
09-02-2007, 12:14 PM
A deadly event this Labor Day week-end.

CHLORIDE, Ariz. - A 13-year-old girl who went missing while riding an all-terrain vehicle was found dead in a mine shaft, while her 10-year-old companion was rescued with serious injuries early Sunday, authorities said.
A rope team descended into the vertical shaft, where the teen was found dead, sheriff's spokeswoman Sandy Edwards said. Efforts were under way to remove her body.
ad_dap('250','300','&PG=NBCMSN&AP=1089');


Edwards did not know how the girls got into the mine or how far down they were. She also did not know the girls' relationship.
The pair went missing about 7 p.m. Saturday and never came back. Officials discovered they were in the shaft about 6:20 a.m. in Chloride, about 17 miles north of Kingman.
The 10-year-old girl had "major injuries" and was being transported to University Medical Center in Las Vegas, Edwards said.

brian10x
09-02-2007, 04:51 PM
A deadly event this Labor Day week-end.

CHLORIDE, Ariz. - A 13-year-old girl who went missing while riding an all-terrain vehicle was found dead in a mine shaft, while her 10-year-old companion was rescued with serious injuries early Sunday, authorities said.
A rope team descended into the vertical shaft, where the teen was found dead, sheriff's spokeswoman Sandy Edwards said. Efforts were under way to remove her body.
ad_dap('250','300','&PG=NBCMSN&AP=1089');


Edwards did not know how the girls got into the mine or how far down they were. She also did not know the girls' relationship.
The pair went missing about 7 p.m. Saturday and never came back. Officials discovered they were in the shaft about 6:20 a.m. in Chloride, about 17 miles north of Kingman.
The 10-year-old girl had "major injuries" and was being transported to University Medical Center in Las Vegas, Edwards said.

Very, very sad.Unfortunately, like other dangerous hobbies, someone with absolutely no knowledge or passion for ghost towns or old mines is going to jump up and demand all old mines should be sealed up. "If we can save only one life, it will be worth it."

Climbing back off soapbox,
Brian

Gravelrash
09-02-2007, 06:17 PM
ml3858857 - I don't think anyone is being paranoid. They have just been trying to help someone who is unfamiliar with American wilderness (me) to get some understanding.
In doing so, they've expressed opinions about possibilities, possibilities a "newbie" should be aware of. I'm glad they did. I didn't have any great fears. As I have said, I know my way around the bush, but America is a whole different kettle of fish, with entirely different eco-systems, flaura and fauna..... and society.
I just thought I'd avail myself of the expertise of the folks here. As I'd do if anyone wanted info on the Australian outback.

Just today, in one of our national papers, this story appeared, showing it is good to be aware if you are a stranger.


http://www.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/story/0,22049,22352331-5001028,00.html
Hungry US bears look for humans' food
COLORADO wildlife officers have killed dozens of black bears this summer after catching the marauding bruins rummaging through campsites, foraging in neighbourhood rubbish bins and breaking into homes for food.
Weather conditions decimated the natural food supply this year for the roughly 10,000 black bears in Colorado.
"It has been a bad summer for human and bear interaction," said Tyler Baskfield, spokesman for the Colorado Division of Wildlife.
From small mountain resorts to eastern Colorado's highly populated urban corridor, 35 bears have been killed under the state's two-strike policy so far this year.
Once a bear has been caught feeding near humans, the animal is tranquilized, tagged and returned to the backcountry. If a tagged bear is caught again, it is killed.
"The problem is not with the bears - they're just opportunistic feeders - but with the way humans behave," Mr Baskfield said, adding that unsealed garbage containers, bird feeders, pet food left outside and even the smell from a barbecue grill will attract bears.
Once the bears lose their fear of humans and associate people with food, the animals must be destroyed, Mr Baskfield said.
Other Western states battling drought conditions have also reported an increase in the number of bear problems.
In New Mexico, two campers were bitten - not seriously - while inside their tents, and the Lake Tahoe, California and Reno, Nevada areas have reported a higher than usual number of bears invading cabins and homes.
A number of factors have contributed to the problem of the nuisance bears forays into populated areas, Mr Baskfield said.
A late spring freeze killed off the mountain wild berry crop that the omnivorous animals normally rely on.
In addition, a hot and arid July dried out other high-country vegetation, forcing the bears to look for other food sources at lower elevations.
There have been no bear attacks on humans reported in Colorado, Mr Baskfield said, but authorities want to avoid a tragedy that could happen such as the June mauling death of an 11-year-old boy by a black bear in the neighbouring state of Utah.
The Colorado bear population has remained fairly constant over the three decades that the numbers have been tracked.
In late summer and early autumn, black bears forage voraciously for the 20,000 calories per day they need to consume before winter hibernation.
Mr Baskfield said sows teach their cubs where to find food including from human sources, a trait they will then pass on to their offspring, creating future generations of bears accustomed to feeding near people.
Until more study is done, Mr Baskfield is hesitant to blame climate change for the situation.
The western United States has been in the grips of a decade-long drought, but in 2006 just nine bears in Colorado had to be destroyed, he said.
Sharon Baruch-Mordo, a doctoral candidate in ecology at Colorado State University, is studying the possible effects of climate change on bears and has found several making unexpected journeys in springtime, earlier in the year than thought.
Until wide-ranging scientific studies are completed, educating people to minimise activities that will lure the bears closer to civilization is the goal of wildlife managers, according to Mr Baskfield.
"We have a saying that a human-fed bear is a dead bear," he said.

ghost_town_huntress
09-02-2007, 08:45 PM
Pete,
Hey, no problem! Just email me when you're in the states and when you'd like to camp out at our property. If you're into hunting it's a great place to go, we've got lots of deer, antelope and elk out there. And thanks to our second amendment rights, just about anybody can own a handgun. Actually, I personally think it's a little too easy to get guns here, but that's just my opinion. And a Captain and Coke refers to Captain Morgan Rum and Coke, it's my drink of choice. I'm not a serious drinker myself, but I like to relax at the end of the day with a nice cold rum and coke. Hope your trip to the states is a great one!

Rachel in Utah ghost_town_huntress@yahoo.com
Rachel, thanks very much for taking the time to help me out. It's much appreciated.



That BLM info is great. I don't like paying for campsites too much, except the ones that have shower facilities!



That's a great offer, very generous, and I'll more than likely take you up on it!!
Two questions remain!!

I'm assuming this is something to do with your fabulous Second Ammendment? (Readers must be getting the idea now - that I am very envious of that part of American freedom!)


The Coke I know. What's a Captain? I actually seldom drink (anymore) but it would be a pleasure to watch a sunset with a jar and a few friends.
****, this business better sell soon! I'm looking forward to this trip more than any other I've ever undertaken. It's been a lifelong dream.....and now its starting to take shape.
Many thanks again, for the info.
Pete

JuneNY
09-14-2007, 10:29 PM
My sister and I started out ghosttowning and expanded to include urban explorations.......which is exploring old abandoned buildings. Here in the northeast where we liive, there aren't all that many ghosttowns.

We recently explored the Pines Hotel in the Catskills. We were told by the former owner, who lives next door that most likely there were some derelicts camped out there. We didn't see anyone, but we did hear sounds of movement that indicated people were there.

I suppose a situation like that could turn dangerous.

bad bob
09-14-2007, 11:34 PM
My sister and I started out ghosttowning and expanded to include urban explorations.......which is exploring old abandoned buildings. Here in the northeast where we liive, there aren't all that many ghosttowns.

We recently explored the Pines Hotel in the Catskills. We were told by the former owner, who lives next door that most likely there were some derelicts camped out there. We didn't see anyone, but we did hear sounds of movement that indicated people were there.

I suppose a situation like that could turn dangerous.


I read somewhere that back east ghost towns are known as "abandoned villages". Not sure how true it is or where the cutoff for "back east" is located. I'd probably start at the Mississippi River.

JuneNY
09-16-2007, 03:04 AM
there don't seem to be very many abandoned villages, although there are some. Unfortunately, very few of them are on ghosttowns.com or other websites.

Urban explorations is jjust as much fun as ghosttowning!

bad bob
09-16-2007, 10:04 AM
there don't seem to be very many abandoned villages, although there are some. Unfortunately, very few of them are on ghosttowns.com or other websites.

Urban explorations is jjust as much fun as ghosttowning!



Someone was posting that here, over a year ago,as I recall, and was even part of an organized club. UEC or UEA, or something. He also said they entered sites whether it was private property or not. As I recall, he said that was part of the thrill, and not getting caught. Members had to leave the sites exactly as they were found, but they were still violating private property laws.

mainmanwalkin
09-16-2007, 11:02 AM
there don't seem to be very many abandoned villages, although there are some. Unfortunately, very few of them are on ghosttowns.com or other websites.

If you want to find other ghost towns in your state or general area, one thing I can suggest is to look for old maps and pick out the town names that no longer show up. Check the internet, you may find a good site for old maps online.

htawebs
09-16-2007, 11:21 AM
Someone was posting that here, over a year ago,as I recall, and was even part of an organized club. UEC or UEA, or something. He also said they entered sites whether it was private property or not. As I recall, he said that was part of the thrill, and not getting caught. Members had to leave the sites exactly as they were found, but they were still violating private property laws.

I have done some urban exploring. It's quite fun (and dangerous).

Concerning trespassing, whether you're urban exploring or ghost towning, you're breaking the law if 1.) you're in the U.S. and 2.) you haven't asked permission from the owner. There isn't one inch of land in the U.S. that isn't owned privately, by the gov't, or by natives.

Therefore, if you don't have permission to be there, you are trespassing. If it's in a national park or the like, you have expressed permission by default unless otherwise stated, and therefore are not trespassing. Otherwise, you can technically be arrested or shot, depending on the laws of the state.

bad bob
09-16-2007, 12:25 PM
I have done some urban exploring. It's quite fun (and dangerous).

Concerning trespassing, whether you're urban exploring or ghost towning, you're breaking the law if 1.) you're in the U.S. and 2.) you haven't asked permission from the owner. There isn't one inch of land in the U.S. that isn't owned privately, by the gov't, or by natives.

Therefore, if you don't have permission to be there, you are trespassing. If it's in a national park or the like, you have expressed permission by default unless otherwise stated, and therefore are not trespassing. Otherwise, you can technically be arrested or shot, depending on the laws of the state.


Most ghost towns that I know of or visited are open to the public, and many depend on tourists to help maintain the buildings or site. Others that have been purchased by an individual, group, or corporation, may require permission to enter, or are off limits to all, usually in a valiant effort to preserve whatever is left. I'm sure you know very well, the difference between a site which prohibits visitors of any kind, and ones which have "expressed permission".

In the event you should ever be "arrested or shot", for trespassing, depending on the state laws, perhaps you could argue that nth degree of legal status to the judge you'll be facing. :)

htawebs
09-16-2007, 12:57 PM
Most ghost towns that I know of or visited are open to the public, and many depend on tourists to help maintain the buildings or site. Others that have been purchased by an individual, group, or corporation, may require permission to enter, or are off limits to all, usually in a valiant effort to preserve whatever is left. I'm sure you know very well, the difference between a site which prohibits visitors of any kind, and ones which have "expressed permission".

In the event you should ever be "arrested or shot", for trespassing, depending on the state laws, perhaps you could argue that nth degree of legal status to the judge you'll be facing. :)

I don't know if you're looking for an argument or not, Bob. However, you won't get one from me.

Also, I have been arrested and convicted for trespass to State land - and no, it's not always that easy to determine which sites are which.

bad bob
09-16-2007, 02:41 PM
I don't know if you're looking for an argument or not, Bob. However, you won't get one from me.

Also, I have been arrested and convicted for trespass to State land - and no, it's not always that easy to determine which sites are which.


Back and forth "discussions" needn't always degrade to arguments (IMO). But it did seem you were using semantics to justify entering private property, (which is usually clearly posted), in pursuit of the thrill of urban exploration.

And I don't buy that "not always that easy to determine which", either. Yes, folks may be confronted by a property owner or security when someone enters their space. I think arrest is rare when logical explanations are offered, such as entering by error, entering to gain permission, or entering for some other reasonable purpose. Entering under cover of darkness, and poking around a site is obviously less than reasonable.

The other UE from a year ago had somewhat of a cavalier attitude toward private property rights, and was determined to explore sites no matter what their legal status was. Don't misunderstand. It's a free country, and I do encourage UEing as much as you like. What occurs as a result afterward is really none of my beeswax. :p

GaryB
09-16-2007, 07:35 PM
Unless it's clearly marked as being closed to the public, most all of the Gov. land around here (West) is BLM regulated. So even if it's on BLM land, it's still open to the general public. I only know of a few sites that have ever been off limits by the BLM, and they were temporary and usually due to unsafe road conditions.

sbruce
09-17-2007, 04:04 PM
Okay it's not a town it's an area: the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Years ago I explored the area when my brother was stationed at Fort Monmouth. The Pine Barrens are spooky even on a bright summer day because the light is just kind of filtered and surreal maybe due to all the broadly spaced trees casting shadows. I believe the movie Blair Witch Project was filmed there and the Pine Barrens are allegedly haunted by the Jersey Devil.

sbruce
09-17-2007, 05:13 PM
Years ago I took off on my own from Lovelock NV to Mazuma, Tunnel, Seven Troughs, and finally Scossa. You may ask: why Scossa? Good question. And why go alone? Never go ghosttowning alone.

Gravelrash
09-17-2007, 05:29 PM
Okay it's not a town it's an area: the New Jersey Pine Barrens.
Are the Pine Barrens the location of a "Sopranos" episode, where Christopher and his mate (I forget the characters name but, hey, what ya gonna do?) get lost in the snow, trying to get rid of the "body" of the Russian heavy?
Gotta love James Gandolphini - I just saw a tribute he did to the troops in Iraq.

Gravelrash
09-17-2007, 05:31 PM
But here's the scoop: years ago a ghosttowner associated with a nevada radio station and website (who shall remain nameless - nothing to do with ghosttowns.com btw) filled his website with facts and fiction. Trouble is the reader never knew where facts left off and fiction began! ........
"Sucker!" and a smiley face.

We all have one, but some just ARE a**holes

htawebs
09-17-2007, 07:59 PM
Years ago I took off on my own from Lovelock NV to Mazuma, Tunnel, Seven Troughs, and finally Scossa. You may ask: why Scossa? Good question. And why go alone? Never go ghosttowning alone.

But here's the scoop: years ago a ghosttowner associated with a nevada radio station and website (who shall remain nameless - nothing to do with ghosttowns.com btw) filled his website with facts and fiction. Trouble is the reader never knew where facts left off and fiction began!

One of the pages related to Scossa near the Black Rock and about sixty miles north of Lovelock. Supposedly Scossa was home to the "perfect house". The perfect ghost town house looked lived-in, it had perfect curtains, kitchen and bedroom, and looked like the occupants had just left.

The website featured photos of a really pretty looking cottage in near-perfect condition. According to the website, the dining room table featured a logbook where casual visitors left their signatures and notes on how interesting the place was - a visitor's log on the kitchen dining table - dating back to the early 1960's!


The pictures on the website made me curious. I wrote to the website owner saying that in my years of ghosttowning I had never seen anything like a perfect abandoned house, all have been vandalized or looted/destroyed to some degree. He replied saying it was all perfectly true. He had just flown over the area a few months ago in his airplane and it was as advertised. I replied back more strongly, saying I thought his perfect house was untrue and a fiction. He replied that it was all true "swear on a stack o' bibles" etc etc.

Okay by this time I had to drive out there to Scossa and find out for myself. I had a few days off but my cousin could not go, and my ex hated ghost towns (one reason she's my ex) so I was on my own.

I'll cut to the quick - I've driven through miles desert nothingness and within site of Scossa. I can indeed see a little green house way off in the distance, but not much inkling of what it's like.

Interestingly there is a car parked by the side of the road with some gents talking. They look like mining people and their vehicle says "Romius Mining Co" on the side. I stopped to chat with them and asked them about Scossa. They said they have a claim nearby but don't recommend going out to Scossa itself when the guy who lives there is around, and especially don't go out there alone. They say this guy has a large ramshackle water truck parked out front, and the Romius guy says never go out there when his water truck is around.

Well it would be dark soon, I had no time to waste and decided that since I'd come that far I'd go have a look anyway, and left the conversation there. So I drive out and maybe it's the mining gent's comments, but the "perfect house" is giving me a definite feeling of unease. I can see the water truck now parked out in front.

First thing I note is the "perfect house" is not perfect at all but in pretty awful shape. The roof looks bad and there are tattered moth-eaten curtains (red) blowing in the wind through broken windows. The lime green paint is badly faded, and large wall areas have been patched with plywood. The place looks terrible.

Suddenly I'm about 300-400 yards away from the house and I see one of the tattered red curtains quickly pull back for a split second with a face I won't describe and I nearly froze in my tracks as the curtain just as quickly flips closed again.

It happened so quickly it was like a dream - there's a face in the window and then it's gone in a millisecond. Scared the heck out of me. I stopped the car, shaken. Why would someone peek out a window like that? My only thought was to go get something.

I am about one hundred yards away from the house now, maybe a little more. Engine still running but car stopped. Now I'm really scared. I don't see a face but I see what appears to be a rifle barrel pointing my direction, in the glint of the setting sun.

You never saw anyone throw a jeep in reverse and skedaddle so fast. No more perfect house for me, and no logbook to sign on the perfect dining table dating from the 1960's. I was out of there like a jack rabbit. No shots, maybe the water truck guy just wanted to scare me but I was not going to find out and he succeeeded. :eek: I'm gone. On my way back I also noticed the Romius guys had left.

Not much more to relate except I also saw what appeared to be a hijacked truck out in the middle of the desert, and as it was getting dark soon the twilight was playing tricks with my sense of direction, but luckily made the right choices and had an eventless trip home.

A few days later I emailed the radio station guy to remonstrate with him that I could have lost my life looking for his "perfect house". His email back was one word:

"Sucker!" and a smiley face.

I'm quoting this for posterity. It's a joke, as I'm sure you all know. Hence, the poster's 'Sucker'.

Everyone, just move on. Nothing to see here. You would know that by his statement when he mentioned seeing someone peering out from a window behind a red curtain at 300-400 yards. That's 900-1200 feet. You'd better be a sniper with a Barrett Light .50 looking through a ****ing proper scope to see that ****.

Bang!

bad bob
09-17-2007, 11:30 PM
Oh-oh. Now posting THAT might have been a mistake. :eek:

mainmanwalkin
09-18-2007, 07:01 AM
....er, um, where is all this stuff coming from? :confused:

GaryB
09-18-2007, 08:36 AM
The offensive posts have been removed.

It would be appreciated if anyone wanting to carry on a flame war do so in private.

Preferably some place else.

Anyone willing to carry on a civilized discussion, whether it involves facts, fiction, or personal belief is welcomed.

People looking to start trouble are not.

Thank you.

LauraA
09-18-2007, 09:15 AM
That's why you're a Super Moderator Gary! :)


1083

40FORDJIM
09-18-2007, 11:53 AM
Thanks, Gary !!

bad bob
09-18-2007, 04:25 PM
And all this time I thought he was a SUPER DUPER Moderator, but there was just no room for DUPER in his official title. :o

brian10x
09-19-2007, 05:17 AM
I guess I'm the only one here that ENJOYS reading offensive posts!

BS

GaryB
09-19-2007, 10:02 AM
As long as I have been around the internet, very little bothers or surprises me anymore. I've been in some heated flame wars and have actually been banned from some sites.

True, I myself let some things slide on here that likely shouldn't be allowed. But unless no one complains, I really have no reason other than personal ones to ban anyone or delete anything. And for the most part, it's not my playground to make rules on. So until someone complains, I stay neutral (as much as humanly possible). If someone does complain, I try to act accordingly.

bad bob
09-19-2007, 04:29 PM
I guess I'm the only one here that ENJOYS reading offensive posts!

BS



Not at all B10x. I not only ENJOY reading them, I really enjoy posting them, and (though I probably shouldn't admit), love getting into verbal abuse contests. Only here, I have to stifle myself to the max because gt'ing is my first priority passion, and of course, the main purpose of this site.

In my dream world fantasy, gt.com initiates another category under "Other", called ...oh I, don't know...something like.."Flamers=This category is used for all flame wars at Ghosttowns.com". :p

bad bob
09-19-2007, 04:42 PM
As long as I have been around the internet, very little bothers or surprises me anymore. I've been in some heated flame wars and have actually been banned from some sites.

True, I myself let some things slide on here that likely shouldn't be allowed. But unless no one complains, I really have no reason other than personal ones to ban anyone or delete anything. And for the most part, it's not my playground to make rules on. So until someone complains, I stay neutral (as much as humanly possible). If someone does complain, I try to act accordingly.



I may have said it before, but either didn't, or can't remember due to alzheimers. But I just believe you, GaryB, are the salt of the earth. I'm serious now! (Did that come out right)?

And for that noted special opinion, I think I should get at least partial immunity for any large posting mistakes made by me in the future. 75% immunity would be OK, but looking more for 90-100% :D

GaryB
09-20-2007, 08:04 AM
I'm more like saltpeter.

sbruce
03-04-2008, 01:48 PM
only in this day and age could the "perfect house" and Scossa Nv be a controversial subject. seriously - and hopefully this won't start a flame war - but does anyone go to any other ghosttowns in or near the Black Rock, and has anyone been to Scossa lately? Not political, just a simple question. :)

teds280z
03-04-2008, 03:27 PM
I think I will be headed there this weekend. Time to get exploring again. I live in Reno and Scossa isn't that far. What is it you want tto know? I did see on the atlas I use there are several other sites around there. Good long day trip.

bad bob
03-04-2008, 05:39 PM
only in this day and age could the "perfect house" and Scossa Nv be a controversial subject. seriously - and hopefully this won't start a flame war - but does anyone go to any other ghosttowns in or near the Black Rock, and has anyone been to Scossa lately? Not political, just a simple question. :)



Flame wars are no longer allowed in here as per the ever-vigilant iron-fisted ruling of GaryB, Super Moderator. :D

Good thing too, because I was being victimized almost daily by ruthless flamers. :p

sbruce
03-07-2008, 01:55 PM
well, i am itching for a virtual fight so yahoo finance message boards will have to suffice.
scoooooooossa .... scooooooossssssa

errrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
:mad:

DirtyDog
03-08-2008, 07:52 AM
I love to explore the MF of Feather River; no GTs but lots of old mining operations. Go armed. I carry a German 8 shot 22 with birdshot in it. Draw and fire from the hip it spreads out in a nice tight circle and always hits the rattler. One time as we drove down I spotted a Cadilac off the road. We stopped and near the front door were several business cards, Tom somebody from Roseville CA, a used car salesman. Later we discovered an old cabin and in it was a made-up callendar. I noted that May showed only 30 days. As we (my son and his friend and I) were crossing the river out of nowhere a man appeared. The first thing I saw was a large caliber revolver in a chest holster. He had on all-black, including hat and full black beard, black shirt, German milit shorts, socks and boots. Our eyes met. I said Howdy and he replied, What are you doing here? I told him just lookin around. I then asked if he wanted an orange and he said sure. I gave him 2 large navel oranges. I also had 4 large Idaho Russet potatoes which I gave him. He said "Happy 4th of July" and I informed him it was the 3rd, not the 4th, but thanks anyhow. It then dawned on me that it was his callendar.

DirtyDog
03-08-2008, 08:38 AM
I accidentally posted before I was done. This hermit then introduced himself as "Tom", to which I added his last name. Should've seen the perplexed look in his face! He was dumb-founded that I knew his name until I told him we had seen his Caddy and found his business cards. People are human; I've run into people out and about but never had any problems.
The next day we met another hermit/gold panner named Eric. A year later I returned and Eric was still there. I invited him up to my camp for a big juicy hamburger and some Coors beer and he brought his vial of gold with him. He spends a day underwater (holds his breath) moving huge boulders and then he scoops up the gravel and spreads it out on a large flat rock underwater. He then picks out the big shiny nuggets. He finds about 1-1/2 oz every 2 days. He doesn't waste time panning. He also doesn't use a weight belt, but of course has a full wet suit. He has ropes secured to the bottom and he pulls himself down while working. Being a scuba diver I suggested he get a sand belt, but it scared him, thinking it would send him to the bottom. The next day I was fording the river (Eric told me how) and my little dog got into the current and was swept away. I screamed at Eric who dropped what he was doing and swam over and as Missy went by plucked her out. BTW if you want to know exactly where this was DON'T ASK. Eric had a huge pile of sand and gravel next to his flat rock and every spring the overburden is swept downriver leaving behind a large accumulation of gold. I know he spent at least 3 years in there, maybe more. The MF of the Feather River is a wild and scenic river, closed to all mining operations. Sniping and gold panning is authorized. The flat rock is in about 4 feet of water.

tuutuutango
03-08-2008, 07:28 PM
(THIS IS A REPLY TO "SAFETYBAR" WHO ORIGINALLY STARTED THIS THREAD SOME TIME AGO...) He stated his concern about safety and strangers during outings while alone in remote areas was bordering on "paranoia..." Below is my reply... and I'm confident it isn't shared by all, but this is just MHO.

This isn't paranoia... it's "situational awareness," and it isn't an "Andy of Mayberry" world we are living in these days... You aren't paranoid my friend, you simply have instinct for survival -- a healthy mental process in these modern times we live in. (Google "Situational Awarness" sometime.) Here is a good link... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Situational_awareness. There are more links like this, but situational awarness should be on everyones mind when they are alone, in a remote area, or in areas they are not familiar with.

About a month or so ago in Georgia, you might recall a college gal going for a jog in a remote state park. Her remains were found a couple of weeks later. Another young lady was killed by the same "loner" not too far from this area. 99% of the time, these terrible crimes occur to victims who were alone -- most often to women, but men are not immune to violence while alone in remote areas. I spent 20+ years in televison news, covering hard news on the Mexico/Texas border. I've seen more murders and violent crimes than many police or border patrol agents see in a career. I didn't cover stories like the"cat up a tree, rescued by the local fire department," or boy scouts picking up trash on the side of the road. I covered Hard News because I was one of the few young pups that had the stomach for it. Just having got out of the Army and after a volunteer stint in Vietnam, not many things un-nerved me. And from this experience, (the school of hard knocks) I learned the value of "situational awarness," --- what got victims "into trouble" in the first place, and I can tell you, "paranoia" can be a healthy survival thing... (I hate to give "loners" a bad name because 1/2 the time I-R-1... my wife works all the time. :(

I used to carry Mace and/or tear gas, but that can backfire if the wind is blowing in the wrong direction. As a double veteran, (Army and Navy) I've been fortunate to have had very fine training in weapons. These days, I never go out there alone without my Colt or my mini-Glock (and my license to carry.) I continue to take training. It is a good process.

A few months ago, a drunk came up onto my back porch shortly before mid-night (I live in the wilderness, miles away from the nearest town, 20 miles from the nearest Sheriffs Office and I have no neighbors nearby) and on this dark night, I was exceedingly happy I had my S&W Titanium 38 in my pants pocket, or I might have had something else in my shorts that night as I was sitting in my recliner, watching this large man lurking at my back door. I live 1,200 feet off the highway on a farm, and people just don't walk up to my back door (even in daylight, I have a fence and no trespassing signs.) And when I am not here, my wife is alone at home... She can hit a rattlesnake with a 9mm Glock like nobody I've seen. (OK, I'm off my soapbox about packing heat... but if another drunk ever comes up to my place and breaks in the back door, we refuse to be a victim and I refuse to be a victim when I am out in the boonies alone.)

I'd recommend anyone camping alone or exploring remote areas to be exceptionally observant in this day and age of "loners." (But who am I to talk, I nearly always go out alone... I like the solitude and accept the risks.)

I don't advise just anyone to pack heat without having some really good training, a license to carry, and refresher courses -- as many as you can find the time for. Training is everything! Firearms training is more than a mechanical thing, training is also a mental process. Just ask the guys who fly our fighter jets... when the doodoo hits the fan, there is no time to think, and the training kicks in and does the work for you. A friend of mine had to punch-out of an F4-Phantom jet one night when things went south. He said, he nevr gave it much thought what to do, the training her had took over and saved his life. He popped the canopy, parachuted to "safety" and after landing in a jungle, that's when more training came in handy. And firearms training (with refresher courses) help the mindset one needs if and when your life if put on the line.

(Please, please, please, anti-gun crowd... don't send me hate mail or flame me... I grew up on a ranch, and guns were always a tool and a necessity. Between rattle snakes, rabid skunks, rabid coyotes, Javalina hogs... a gun was someting you didn't go out of the house with... And I certainly didn't go to Vietnam without training and an M-60... I don't go to gun shows, subscribe to gun magazines or wear camo clothing -- not that I think there is a problem with that, just don't stereotype me. A gun is a tool, not an instrument to terrorize someone with... In Texas out here on the farm, for many of us, it's like having a broom in a closet...)

Play it safe GT friends... When in a remote area, take a friend, a dog, tell people where you are, carry a cell phone (I pack two, and have a third one built into my OnStar in my truck.) Carry a big stick. But if you elect to carry a firearm, take professional training and then take refresher courses.

Long story made short, I was a kid growing up in the 50s when people didn't lock their doors, when kids didn't go to school and kill other kids, when "terrorist" and "stalker" wasn't in our lexicon -- When "home-invasion" and "car-jacking" were terms never heard on the evening news.

Law enforcement and Government (Uncle Sugar) can't always protect us, especially when exploring relics in the middle of nowhere. In these "modern times" being cognizant of our environment and surroundings is more important now than it has ever been, and being "paranoid" while alone in the boon-docks is a healthy thing... If you see a stranger out there in the woods, there is a good chance it ain't "Aunt Bee." That stranger could just BE your next best friend however, but be cautious fellow GTers... This is 2008 and not Mayberry 1958...

bad bob
03-08-2008, 09:14 PM
Gotta agree 100%.

If there was a msg of the year award here at gt.com, I'd have to nominate this one for that honor. :)

LauraA
03-09-2008, 05:49 AM
Gotta agree 100%.
If there was a msg of the year award here at gt.com, I'd have to nominate this one for that honor. :)

I agree as well. It's foolhardy to not be prepared and protected. Stumbling upon a pot farm in the boonies is a distinct possibility, between that and desperate illegals, drug smugglers, angry critters or just plain ornery people we never know what we'll run across.
Tuutuu is so right, it's not a 1958 world anymore...wow...where does time go? :o

Paladin
03-09-2008, 07:43 AM
I agree- It's better to have a gun and not need it, than to need a gun and not have it. Dialing 911 (If you can get a signal) will only ensure your murder will be investigated. Because the police likely can't get to a ghost town quickly. Most departments patrol inhabited towns, not the uninhabited...

caver
03-09-2008, 08:42 AM
I don't own or carry a gun and get into some pretty remote areas.
I've had a bear encounter,,,the bear was more scared of my motorcycle and high tailed it out of there. I crawled out of a cave that was known for rattlesnakes at the entrance,,,,only to have a fellow caver almost step on one a few minutes later outside the cave entrance. Encountered weird people,,,,always interesting. Maybe I like risk,,,,,kinda good for the soul I think. :D

LauraA
03-09-2008, 03:31 PM
I don't own or carry a gun and get into some pretty remote areas.
I've had a bear encounter,,,the bear was more scared of my motorcycle and high tailed it out of there. I crawled out of a cave that was known for rattlesnakes at the entrance,,,,only to have a fellow caver almost step on one a few minutes later outside the cave entrance. Encountered weird people,,,,always interesting. Maybe I like risk,,,,,kinda good for the soul I think. :D

"Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing. To keep our faces toward change and behave like free spirits in the presence of fate is strength undefeatable." Helen Keller (Let Us Have Faith)

But just in case she's wrong, I'll still be packin' a 45. ;) :D

Paladin
03-09-2008, 06:38 PM
But just in case she's wrong, I'll still be packin' a 45. ;) :D
Amen Laura!:D

Mikejts
03-10-2008, 01:25 PM
I would only add a PLB (Personal Locator Beacon) as a potential added item to carry.

My wife got mad at me recently when I carried to church. (I do have a concealed carry permit) That night before the services started an individual came strolling up the isle carrying an item folded up in his hands. As he reached the alter he started unrolling his flag and asking everyone including the good lord to praise his flag. He was removed without incident but there were moments that were tenuous at best.

I live in Colorado, shortly after she scolded me the news came in that several people were killed at churches locally. She doesn't scold me any more.

ThePainkiller
03-10-2008, 02:52 PM
I've just started Ghost Towning and I have become aquantinces with a caretaker of one. From the other side of the coin, they're just afraid of us as we are of them. And each side should be. He was explaining to me a few years back, some kids firebombed the only two story bulding in town. All 12 of the towns people had to fight the fire themselves for 2 hours before help arrived. He told me, we dont call 911 before...there's no point. It takes them 2 hours to get here. We call afterward.

He was telling me one night he woke up to some noises outside his window and he saw someone looking in through the window, by the time he got his gun, the guy was gone. I imagine thats what you deal with everyday when you occupy a ghost town. Put yourselves in their shoes, you live in a issolated old town and you have people driving through at all hours, most of whom are armed. Id be pretty paranoid too.

The moral, treat the town, property, and owners with respect and you wont get shot ;) . If it looks like someone lives there (cars are a dead giveaway), someone probably does and they have just as much right to privacy on a ghost town as we do in our own homes.

The Late Dr HaZzMatt
03-10-2008, 05:01 PM
thats scarry!:eek:

bob3 was bob2
03-10-2008, 06:46 PM
I've just started Ghost Towning and I have become aquantinces with a caretaker of one. From the other side of the coin, they're just afraid of us as we are of them. And each side should be. He was explaining to me a few years back, some kids firebombed the only two story bulding in town. All 12 of the towns people had to fight the fire themselves for 2 hours before help arrived. He told me, we dont call 911 before...there's no point. It takes them 2 hours to get here. We call afterward.

He was telling me one night he woke up to some noises outside his window and he saw someone looking in through the window, by the time he got his gun, the guy was gone. I imagine thats what you deal with everyday when you occupy a ghost town. Put yourselves in their shoes, you live in a issolated old town and you have people driving through at all hours, most of whom are armed. Id be pretty paranoid too.

The moral, treat the town, property, and owners with respect and you wont get shot ;) . If it looks like someone lives there (cars are a dead giveaway), someone probably does and they have just as much right to privacy on a ghost town as we do in our own homes.

Inhabited ghost towns? I try to avoid those. :)

ThePainkiller
03-12-2008, 08:35 AM
Inhabited ghost towns? I try to avoid those. :)

A good idea for sure. I dunno about other states but here in AZ, ghost towns will be randomly inhabbited by someone. I dunno if they're just drifters or waht, but sometimes no one will live there, sometimes someone will. You never know.

danbo
03-13-2008, 07:43 AM
My wife got mad at me recently when I carried to church. (I do have a concealed carry permit) That night before the services started an individual came strolling up the isle carrying an item folded up in his hands. As he reached the alter he started unrolling his flag and asking everyone including the good lord to praise his flag. He was removed without incident but there were moments that were tenuous at best.



Wow, I'm not the only guy who has "bounced" someone out of a church service!
I'm an elder in Calvary Chapel and have had to use my "prison skills" more than once, to get
a wack job out the door. Folks are surprised to learn how many people are righteously
carrying concealed in church services. It's a sad day when even churches require armed security.

The problem with "Shinning the Light" is that it also attracts a lot of "bugs".

I miss Mayberry too.:(

tuutuutango
03-14-2008, 01:59 AM
... Texas laws do not allow carrying a handgun inside a church. I'd suggest for anybody doing so to review their CCL material. In Texas, we have to take the test every couple of years and refresh on the rules, and demonstrate we can still make a pattern in a target...

As far as Mayberry, I'll go out on a limb and confess that on many days, I record it on DISH Network... Being about Opie's same age, I am happy I was a kiddo growing up in that time-frame and delighted I had a small town to visit when going to see my grand parents.... Poor kids today, Rap Music... Reality shows on TV, iPods. My generation had Hoola Hoops... Father Knows Best and Donna Reed were on TV and we would go to the drive-in theatre in a station wagon with home-made pop corn... Give me the 50s anyday over what kids are growing up in these days... (No kid today in his/her right mind would ever go to a drive in wearing their PJs.... :):rolleyes:

I miss Mayberry too.:([/quote]

Mikejts
03-14-2008, 11:14 AM
[quote=tuutuutango;31308]... Texas laws do not allow carrying a handgun inside a church. I'd suggest for anybody doing so to review their CCL material. In Texas, we have to take the test every couple of years and refresh on the rules, and demonstrate we can still make a pattern in a target...

Good advise - No restriction here for churches and yes I contnue to do the refresher courses. Just took one again in December. I have my target hanging in my garage with a nice tight pattern.

sbruce
03-14-2008, 04:59 PM
Going out in the desert anywhere - out to the middle of nowhere - is very risky, especially alone.

As an anecdotal example, one friend well acquainted with the area around Seven Troughs-Mazuma told me that the "inhabited" property near Tunnel was inhabited by a rather unpleasant individual who was not supposed to be living there at all. And that the true owner of the property had "mysteriously" disappeared. For those who know the area, the inhabited dwelling is covered with microwave dishes, ham radio gear and tall antennas.

In fact, this whole area north of Lovelock in Pershing county is mildly strange. While exploring near Tunnel I was aware of being watched and trailed even though I was unable to determine exactly who was monitoring my movements or why. I definitely did see an individual in the distance at times probably as curious about me as I was about him, but neither of us were about to approach the other. There are several small shacks in the vicinity of Seven Troughs, and a small spring. Someone was, at the time, apparently 'squatting' there.

Finally visited Scossa and have recounted the visit already in this thread, which was certainly a most bizarre experience in ten years of ghost-towning.

I have heard drunks in VC saying they thought the Black Rock desert was a vortex for alien landings - don't know about that, but my visit to the region certainly made me a Coast-to-Coast radio fan. :cool:

sbruce
03-14-2008, 05:07 PM
This is another anecdote and I cannot find proof that it occurred, but the former caretaker out at Rhyolite told me a few years ago that the caretaker before her had been shot and killed by a vandal stealing bottles one night, from the old bottle house. The vandal/killer was never caught. Has anyone else heard that?

tuutuutango
03-15-2008, 01:52 AM
Going out in the desert anywhere - out to the middle of nowhere - is very risky, especially alone.


In 1980, I was returning home from Mount St. Helens (where I almost made an ash out of myself... REALLY! I was above Spirit Lodge and on the side of the mountain that blew, one week before the eruption doing freelance photography... I digress, back to the "going out in the desert alone" story.)

As I was driving back to Texas, I was in a hurry to get back for a freelance project at home... I drove and drove and drove from Washington state (almost without stopping) in my trusty 1971 VW beetle.

At 2 a.m. about 20 miles south of Moab, Utah on a lonely two-lane road, a car was approaching from the opposite direction. They had their high-beam lights on. I flicked mine to high and back to low... The other guys kept theirs on high (all 4 lights). Again, I flicked mine to high and back to low. Still, the other guys kept their lights on high beam.

Just a few feet prior to passing each other, I saw a passenger throw a beer can out the back window at me, as if trying to break my windshield. The can still had beer in it, and had it hit my windshield, not only would the tiny (flat) windshield have broken, I probably would have lost control and ended up in a ditch.

I regained my composure, looked in my re-view mirror and saw the other car make a "U" turn and started coming after me.

Despite having my Colt Combat Commander in the seat next to me (using a gun should always be a last option... I figure if I can use my brains, or run like the devil... that is a much better solution) I turned the lights out on my VW and continued down the lonely road, using the light of a full moon to navigate by.

I saw a clearing on my right side and using my parking brake rather than my foot-brake, I skidded to slow down and whipped into the clearing going West into the moonlight. (By using my parking brake and not my foot brake, I gave no illumination from my brake lights... I was driving totally in the dark and wanted to keep it that way.) I didn't want these guys to see me as I turned off into the tullies. I was out numbered, most certainly "out horsepowered" and the odds were not stacked in my favor EXCEPT -- growing up in the deserts around EL Paso and spending my youth on a ranch, I was heck on wheels in a VW in the prairie... And this particular VW had been hopped up BIG TIME and had fatter tires than normal. (By hopped up, I mean a sodium filled non-stock camshaft, bigger jugs, SCAT heads and some other goodies.. just thought I would add this for the VW fans on GhostTowns...)

I quickly drove down the clearing about 1/2 a mile and parked my car behind a clump of brush, jumped out of the VW, ran to the opposite side of the the clearing (with the Colt) and waited. Heck, for me, I felt like I was back in Vietnam, waiting for a Charlie ambush... I was pretty confident that even if these drunks saw me driving off into the tullies and if they tried to head out across the sand, they would get stuck in what looked like a very heavy early 70s Oldsmobile, about the size of a barn. (I mean what are the chances of a carload of drunks NOT getting stuck in soft dirt in a car that weighed as much as a small house?) Had they come after me and had they gotten stuck (very likely) this way, I could drive off in my VW (to live happily ever after) whilst drunks were sunk to their oil pan in a porker Oldsmobile in the middle of nowhere.

I was trying to put as many "advantages" on my side of the equation as possible, since the cards were not originally stacked in my favor. (My list of "advantages..." #1. Desert Rat in a VW, #2 Combat veteran and not in a good mood, #3. I was not drunk nor had been drinking, #4. I had a predetermined attitude of refusing to be a victim.... and did I mention the VW that loved galloping in the desert?)

My guardian angel was riding shot-gun in that Beetle that night, and fortunately for me, the carload of drunks kept going straight in the original direction I had been driving. I watched their bright lights drive down the highway for about 5 miles before they made another "U" turn and started back on the road to Moab.

But, even though I had a big handgun, training and experience in using it, I always think it is better to use the old "noggin" and avoid an encounter....

Yep, weird stuff can happen in the desert to people who are alone.

That night, as I was being chased -- driving my little beetle without any lights, in a desert I knew little about, going through the gears at a rapid pace, I thought about a bumper sticker that reads, "SHIFT HAPPENS." I was working the gears like a madman... and man, was I shiftin' that night!

(Someday, remind me to be like Paul Harvey and finish the Mount Saint Helens adventure so you'll know, "The Rest Of The Story...")

Gravelrash
03-20-2008, 02:27 AM
Good cautionary tale, TuuTuu. I took years to learn that discretion really is the better part of valor!!
These days I'm not even under any misconceptions that vermin respect people in wheelchairs.
They don't!

WorkinStiff
03-22-2008, 06:12 PM
:eek: So I know of this fellow who likes to get off by himself & camp in remote places...A few years back, (2003?) he hiked into Big Bend Nat Park which is in West Texas on the Mexican border.. He'd hiked in on a remote trail, seeing no one & decided to camp..He saw this shelf a couple hundred ft above the trail and hiked up to it, setting up his small tent well back from the edge , making sure it was not in view of anyone who should happen along the trail....Late that night he thought he heard muffled voices coming from the trail so he grabbed his night vision & oh so carefully, crawled to the edge of this shelf to peer down at the trail..He saw several men walking in single file & each was carrying an automatic weapon..The point man was also decked out in full face night vision goggles...He said that they had a definite military bearing about them & were speaking spanish...He quickly ducked back behind a rock and froze until he could hear their footsteps receding in the distance....Terrified, he crawled back to his tent and didn't move for 45minutes..He then broke camp and very carefully hiked out, got to the trail head, jumped in his jeep & drove for several hours...He never reported it to any authorities and is now a bit paranoid about going off by himself....

sbruce
03-28-2008, 03:47 PM
Wow those are scary stories alright! And well written, thanks.

I'll leave the one out where I was about twelve years old driving my dad's golf cart out alone near Redlands for kicks. And had to have the cart winched off the edge of a precipice by a helpful guy in a pick-up truck. He probably wonders to this day WTH a kid in a golf cart was doing out in the San Bernardino desert stuck on the edge of a sandy cliff. Luckily, the guy who rescued me never knew my parents - because they never knew about that little adventure either thanks to him. :)

Gravelrash
03-30-2008, 11:40 PM
He probably wonders to this day WTH a kid in a golf cart was doing out in the San Bernardino desert stuck on the edge of a sandy cliff.

No, no.... it sounds perfectly reasonable to me!

MAD JACK
04-03-2008, 02:54 PM
Bonneville Mariner, thanks for that info. I am getting the picture - just behave with respect for the wildlife, same as you do back home. I've been reading a fair bit about rattlers and now, armed with some "local knowledge", I reckon I am on an equal footing but I was still a bit apprehensive about bears - don't know why, I've never seen one! LOL
Anyway, your bit about never having seen one in the wild is good to know. However, a few more packs of bear spray go into the kitbag!
I'm with you on the "no tent" policy. I'll be sleeping in the back of a pickup or van. I need to do that because, being an amputee, I need things to be at a reasonable height. Try lying down on the ground with one foot raised, and you'll see what I mean!

My itinerary is still a bit open ended, with a fair bit depending on how soon my business sells, affecting which season I will arrive in..... and the plans my wife has for the money!!
I've got a very good mate in Arizona who is going to take time off work so we can "do" Arizona/New Mexico. He has a cabin on the Mogollon Rim - brilliant!! So, I will either fly in to Phoenix and start from there or plan #2 is to fly in to Seattle, buy a vehicle there, drive across to Glacier National Park and then slowly filter my way down through Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and then Arizona. I can't get enough of the Rockies.

I am planning on approx. 2 weeks per state which will give me a bit of time to get into California as well, which fits in with my wife and daughter's plans. They have no interest at all in Ghost Towns (can you believe it!!) but a LOT of interest in shopping, so LA and SanFran are high on their lists of priorities. We have a friend who lives in Malibu, so she has become the "designated shopper". Good luck to them all! I want to go to Death Valley and Yosemite so I might just drop them off and pick 'em up when I'm done!
I will be applying for a job at U of New Mexico also, and the timing of their application procedure/process is also a factor that will influence my itinerary.
I sure do hope I have the opportunity to meet up with some of ypu friendly folk. Already I can say, it would be an honor. First round is on me.
I had to laugh after reading you might apply for a job in NM. that state has the largest population of black bear, south of the US/CANADIAN border

teds280z
04-03-2008, 05:55 PM
It sounds like you don't plan on visiting Nevada. The easten side of NV is loaded with old mining towns and the sites we enjoy. GT has a ton of them listed check them out. Welcome to the states

sbruce
04-04-2008, 10:06 AM
I think I will be headed there this weekend. Time to get exploring again. I live in Reno and Scossa isn't that far. What is it you want tto know? I did see on the atlas I use there are several other sites around there. Good long day trip.

There was a stamp mill near tunnel still in pretty good shape about four years ago, just wondering if it is still there? Also the "perfect house" really did exist in Scossa, even if its condition was far far less than perfect - is it still there and any signs of habitation? thx,

teds280z
04-07-2008, 06:57 AM
Tunnell Camp is still the way it has been and the stamp mill is still there. I tried to reach Scossa about the time I left the last post but I was up there by myself and there was to much snow I didn't want to take a chance in one spot. MySportage kept slipping toward a cliff I didn't feel like rolling out of there. It might be passible now. This was my first time up there so I couldn't tell you about the perfect house.

DirtyDog
04-07-2008, 08:23 AM
I had to laugh after reading you might apply for a job in NM. that state has the largest population of black bear, south of the US/CANADIAN border
"equal footing" with rattlers reminded me of a time my son and I were exploring an old cabin in the Salmon River Natl Forest in Idaho. I was examining a "Hoosier" and when my son yelled "Rattle snake" I lifted my head quickly and hit my head on the hoosier. (A hoosier is a built-in kitchen cabinet). I said where? And he said "I'm standing on it" ("equal footing"). Sure enough the rotted and weakened floor where he was standing gave way and sank about 8 inches to the ground, pinning one very angry 4 foot rattler! I went over and examined the situation and immediately began clearing stuff away so my son could safely jump backwards. I told him to "jump on three" and when I said "One" he jumped; he hit me with his shoulder in the nose and almost knocked me over. In the meantime the snake escaped. We dug it out and I shot it and cut off the rattles (4 of them). I hate snakes. There was a calendar on the wall dated 1957. There was a small mill and inside, built on the ground, was a rifflebox. It was full of a white powdery substance. I didn't have a pan at the time and had no way to transport the "fines". With the price of gold going up I have half a notion to return there to pan out those fines. There was a spring nearby with lots of wasps and yellowjackets digging in the mud. To get there we had to float/swim across the ""River of No Return". For obvious reasons I have not included the directions.

Gravelrash
04-07-2008, 01:51 PM
It sounds like you don't plan on visiting Nevada. The easten side of NV is loaded with old mining towns and the sites we enjoy. GT has a ton of them listed check them out. Welcome to the states

Me, Ted???
When I finally get my butt into gear and sell this business I will definitely be going to Nevada, I just didn't type it in to the list!!
Nevada is an absolute priority. I could not imagine being in America, going ghost-towning, and leaving Nevada out of the frame! I have engaged the services of one Mr Bad Bob as chaufeur so I have to give him some serious miles to consider.
I am on the lookout for any people who'd like to show off their particular corner of their particular favorite State, so ..... lemme hear from you when I get over there!
Mikejts doesn't know it yet but he's taking me into the high places of Colorado and TuuTuuTango is booked in for a trip to Mogollon. Laura has to show me her tame Coatimundii.


I had to laugh after reading you might apply for a job in NM. that state has the largest population of black bear, south of the US/CANADIAN border
That is excellent news! My interest in bears has grown exponentially with my increasing knowledge of "outback America". It would be a highlight to see a bear.
And a cougar!
And a buffalo!
And a coatimundi!
And a javelina!
And Seldom Seen Slim.

Goat
04-07-2008, 03:28 PM
Hey Gravel, if you need another chauffeur, give me a yell.

Gravelrash
04-07-2008, 10:00 PM
Oh **** yeah, Goat, you are definitely "on the list".
I'm jusr re-reading Stephen Kings "The Stand" - (gets really boring, down in the store!) -and when he describes Vegas in such.....glowing terms...... well, I've been thinking of you, buddy!
As I mentioned some time ago, I wouldn't mind seeing Vegas at night, from about 30 miles distance, up in the mountains. I'm sure it's pretty then.

GaryB
04-08-2008, 07:41 AM
That's about the only time it's nice to look at. The rest of time it's covered in a brown haze. They say it's smog, I think it's residual BS.

BTW: Gravel if your a King fan, the story Desperation was based on the mining lore of a mine by Ely, NV. I forget whether he heard of it on the Ghost Train Ride (a steam powered locomotive ride on authentic old rail lines to Ruth, NV) or not, but they mention the lore and his story on the train ride as it passes right by the original site.

tuutuutango
04-11-2008, 06:33 AM
Mikejts doesn't know it yet but he's taking me into the high places of Colorado and TuuTuuTango is booked in for a trip to Mogollon. Laura has to show me her tame Coatimundii. It would be a highlight to see a bear.
And a cougar!
And a buffalo!
And a coatimundi!
And a javelina!
And Seldom Seen Slim.

I didn't see I was volunteered, but happy to be on the volunteer list...
(I must have missed the post about Laura's Coatimundi :eek:) Now I have to go Google.

You'll have to add ferrel hogs to your critters list... Being a Southwesterener, I've seen hundreds of javalinas, but ferrel hogs out here are bigger, uglier and remind me of 600 pound terrorists (they might be fatter than terrorists, but they smell about the same...)

And, I'd say go see a Chupacabra. They run around here in Texas... Here is a link to this wierd looking creature... http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,295481,00.html

If the Magic Bus is running again (I blew a spark plug right out of the Ford aluminum head) I'll even elevate you up the shaft (excluding windy days, which make even me a tad nervous, and I love heights.) Once you see a Chupacabra, you might just want to be 34 feet off the ground on a windy day.

Holler (as we say here in Texas) when you hit ground here in the States. Mogollon has been waiting a long, long time.

LauraA
04-11-2008, 06:45 AM
(I must have missed the post about Laura's Coatimundi :eek:) Now I have to go Google.


"Tame" might be stretching it a bit, but here's the post. Animal Encounters - Page 2 - Ghosttowns.com Forums (http://forums.ghosttowns.com/showthread.php?t=15776&page=2&highlight=coatimundi)
Since then, we've seen one other one, but he didn't pause for pictures.

GaryB
04-11-2008, 07:55 AM
I found a few stories like the chupacabra one about a weird wolf mixed dog creature in Maine IIRC awhile back. It was going around killing cats and small dogs till someone nailed it with their car. Stray dogs will cross breed (so will domestic cats) so after awhile you get some weird crap running around. I'm sure it was an issue back in the day, so seeing some freaky mixed dog could lead to some serious legends.

Just another reason to carry a weapon IMO.

tuutuutango
04-11-2008, 10:24 AM
(so will domestic cats)

About 10 months ago, I had to set out a "live-trap" in order to catch a monster ferrel cat that was beating the bajeebers out of my barn cats (all of which have been spayed/neutered)... I keep cats around to keep the mice population in check, which helps keep rattlesnakes from prowing around here looking for a free mouse lunch/supper.

The ferrel cat was released about 20 miles away where I keep my airplane... I'd never want to meet that cat again, but I hope he is doing his job going after mice or snakes. I wanted to get this "fixed" but he was so mean and vicious, it wasn't possible for anyone to get near him. He's probably out there at this very moment killing other stray ferrel animals...

Yep, one of the reasons I keep a S&W Titanium 38 in my pocket. You never know when a rapid animal will come up. My vet told me about a guy who was trapped in his garage by a rapid coyote near my farm... The guy was able to leap up into the bed of his pick up (while Wyile Coyote was charging him) reach through his back sliding window and grab his rifle... Had the guy not had a rifle in his pick-up, I doubt if he could have "encouraged" the mad coyote to wander off on his own.

bad bob
04-11-2008, 06:43 PM
Hey Gravel, if you need another chauffeur, give me a yell.



HEY! I resemble that! :mad:

Goat
04-11-2008, 07:24 PM
No offense BB, just offering as a last resort. You're the #1 guy on this gig!

Besides, anyone that rides shotgun with me gets a free "sagebrush shave" on the right arm/face!:D

bad bob
04-11-2008, 09:37 PM
No offense BB, just offering as a last resort. You're the #1 guy on this gig!

Besides, anyone that rides shotgun with me gets a free "sagebrush shave" on the right arm/face!:D




Hmmmm I've never had one of those, but always willing to try something free. :p

GaryB
04-12-2008, 01:15 PM
Besides, anyone that rides shotgun with me gets a free "sagebrush shave" on the right arm/face!:D

Yeah, but have you got desert pinstriping on your roof yet?

Goat
04-12-2008, 01:59 PM
Dunno for sure, I'm only 5'-7'.:D

bad bob
04-12-2008, 07:07 PM
Dunno for sure, I'm only 5'-7'.:D


Me too Goat, I'm 5'7". Well more accurately 5'7" by 5'7" :)

Goat
04-12-2008, 07:51 PM
Just more to shave BB, just more to shave.;)

Hey, what the...WOOHOO I'm now officially a 4WDriver Ghost Towner!!!

Gravelrash
04-26-2008, 04:30 PM
G'day friends.
I haven't had a decent bout of GT.com for a few weeks....work is insane at the moment - (but good, if you know what I mean) - so I haven't been able to reply to anyone. Please don't figure me fer iggerant!

Seriously, I'd be really priviledged to hook up with as many of you as I can and to be able to share your love of your particular corner of the USA. The feelings you all have for your history and heritage is palpable and very strong. You all inspire me.

There are encouraging signs of an imminent escape from my "Mom and Pop" but I don't want to jinx it by talking about it too much. However, "Ho for Jarbidge" is looking good!

I tell you no lies, the way things are going in Australia at the moment, a Green Card is looking like salvation! I hear you all, (I hear ya loud and clear), when you talk about the "greenies" and etc, and all the stupidity that goes on with "the environment".... and all that stuff, the "rules and regulations" that are in over-drive..... but America surely can't be as nuts as Australia is under this Labor (read: Socialist) Government???
I am seriously thinking of applying for Refugee Status, as I am an endangered species in my own nation!
God Bless America..... apparently you are all clinging to "guns and religion".
LOL - .... and his point is?:o

brian10x
04-26-2008, 06:45 PM
G'day friends.
I haven't had a decent bout of GT.com for a few weeks....work is insane at the moment - (but good, if you know what I mean) - so I haven't been able to reply to anyone. Please don't figure me fer iggerant!

Seriously, I'd be really priviledged to hook up with as many of you as I can and to be able to share your love of your particular corner of the USA. The feelings you all have for your history and heritage is palpable and very strong. You all inspire me.

There are encouraging signs of an imminent escape from my "Mom and Pop" but I don't want to jinx it by talking about it too much. However, "Ho for Jarbidge" is looking good!

I tell you no lies, the way things are going in Australia at the moment, a Green Card is looking like salvation! I hear you all, (I hear ya loud and clear), when you talk about the "greenies" and etc, and all the stupidity that goes on with "the environment".... and all that stuff, the "rules and regulations" that are in over-drive..... but America surely can't be as nuts as Australia is under this Labor (read: Socialist) Government???
I am seriously thinking of applying for Refugee Status, as I am an endangered species in my own nation!
God Bless America..... apparently you are all clinging to "guns and religion".
LOL - .... and his point is?:o

Yes, how true. You are wise beyond your years. (And that is saying a lot since you are older than dirt)

I admit to being a bitter American, clinging to God and guns for security.

I know it is out of fashion these days, but I admit that I love my country and I proudly wave the flag.

High Desert Drifter
05-05-2008, 04:06 PM
Yes, how true. You are wise beyond your years. (And that is saying a lot since you are older than dirt)

I admit to being a bitter American, clinging to God and guns for security.

I know it is out of fashion these days, but I admit that I love my country and I proudly wave the flag.

Amen Brian, our founding fathers gave us the right, and I plan to exercise it! seems all the wierdo's have come out of their hiding places the past few years and are challenging everything america was meant to stand for...

teds280z
05-06-2008, 06:00 AM
I really agree with that:mad:

bcush10663
05-06-2008, 09:34 PM
I'm going to play the devil's advocate for a second. While I've never had the opportunity to visit a ghost town, being a student/amateur photographer, I have had some experience pursuing certain subjects (I did a project on barns) that are generally situated on private property, and was confronted by an owner, but was able to diffuse the situation by promising to give him a series of prints of his barns.
While your intentions may be completely innocent, and you may think that there is no harm in visiting a certain location, the owner's experience may be completely different, if say, he encounters a steady number of innocent visitors over a given time period. If they become confrontational with you, and even display a firearm, odds are that they a) do not intend to use it b) are not really crazy and c) are not looking to hassle the out of towner. More than likely their actions reflect the level of frustration they feel toward people entering their property with out permission and probably even more so, without regard for the fact that it is their private property, and that no effort was made to obtain permission, which in my experience, is generally well received.
The second point concerns the behavior of locals. You need to remember that you are the unusual/uncommon presence in their environment, and at the very least curiosity should be expected. Secondly, if someone unknown to the locals all of a sudden sets up camp in the vicinity of their homes, in an area that is not designated a campsite, it isn't unreasonable to expect them to be concerned and defensive, and investigate the uncommon behavior that is someone all of a sudden appearing out of no where.
The smartest thing to do would be to make the effort, and try to notify whoever you may encounter while on location, in advance and when appropriate, seek permission. At the very least, try to get as much information about the land you wish to visit from locals, when you arrive or go through a nearby town. That way you can get a feel of what to expect. It'll probably make for a much more enjoyable, less anxious trip.

The most important thing to remember is: If you innocently and inadvertantly enter someone's property, and they approach you with a gun in hand, and you assume that they are threatening you or showing hostility, and you respond, preemptively with force, you will not have a leg to stand on in court, if you try to claim self defense.

High Desert Drifter
05-06-2008, 11:45 PM
umm... most of the ghost towns most of us visit are on federal - blm or forest svc lands. we have every right to use these lands for our recreation. It is unfortunate that these same lands attract nut cases who are unable to live a civilized life with the rest of society and like to hide out in make-shift camps here, or that they also attract meth labs, people hiding from the law, or your every day run of the mill person who likes to take advantage of others.... My point is, that if they are up to no good and see that you too are armed and confident in your surroundings, that alone may deter an incident. If it doesn't, and they still decide to victimize you, or worse, one of your dear family members. Than plan B comes in to play.

I don't think anyone here would trespass one anothers land (it being posted) and go in with an attitude, or worse yet brandishing a weapon... at least I hope not. However, your point is well taken, although similar to those who preach gun control.



I'm going to play the devil's advocate for a second. While I've never had the opportunity to visit a ghost town, being a student/amateur photographer, I have had some experience pursuing certain subjects (I did a project on barns) that are generally situated on private property, and was confronted by an owner, but was able to diffuse the situation by promising to give him a series of prints of his barns.
While your intentions may be completely innocent, and you may think that there is no harm in visiting a certain location, the owner's experience may be completely different, if say, he encounters a steady number of innocent visitors over a given time period. If they become confrontational with you, and even display a firearm, odds are that they a) do not intend to use it b) are not really crazy and c) are not looking to hassle the out of towner. More than likely their actions reflect the level of frustration they feel toward people entering their property with out permission and probably even more so, without regard for the fact that it is their private property, and that no effort was made to obtain permission, which in my experience, is generally well received.
The second point concerns the behavior of locals. You need to remember that you are the unusual/uncommon presence in their environment, and at the very least curiosity should be expected. Secondly, if someone unknown to the locals all of a sudden sets up camp in the vicinity of their homes, in an area that is not designated a campsite, it isn't unreasonable to expect them to be concerned and defensive, and investigate the uncommon behavior that is someone all of a sudden appearing out of no where.
The smartest thing to do would be to make the effort, and try to notify whoever you may encounter while on location, in advance and when appropriate, seek permission. At the very least, try to get as much information about the land you wish to visit from locals, when you arrive or go through a nearby town. That way you can get a feel of what to expect. It'll probably make for a much more enjoyable, less anxious trip.

The most important thing to remember is: If you innocently and inadvertantly enter someone's property, and they approach you with a gun in hand, and you assume that they are threatening you or showing hostility, and you respond, preemptively with force, you will not have a leg to stand on in court, if you try to claim self defense.

230
05-07-2008, 08:43 PM
Well i intended to Quote a comment in one of the first posts here but have lost it now after reading 20 pages of posts.
Basically i am a Canadian GTer and i am armed when i am out there.I have kids and they are almost always with me and they are always armed with pocket knives and bows.We don't need to worry much about strange folk out in the bush although the threat is always there i suppose but we do have a very real threat of animals.If we don't see at least one bear a day something is wrong.The bears don't scare me much unless we happen along them with cubs but they generally are gone before we get too close.The wolves are much of a concern.The rattlers are a small concern but we havent had any trouble with them yet.The cougars on the other hand do scare me because they have been hunting and tracking you long before you know they are there.We run in to them every third or so trip out.But we have the dog and as long as you watch the signs you have enough warning to send out a warning shot and hopefully the cat gets the hint.

Cougars are the reason i carry my weapons.I wont shoot untill the threat is close enough to be a real threat,maybe 20 yrds or less.I have a rifle for the longer shots if needed,A shotgun for close shots,a bow for whatever and a machette for last resort.I walk with a cane so quickly removing myself from the threat is not an option.We had a close call a month or so back with a cat when we were exploring the Frenchman's mines but that is the only time i have felt threatened when exploring and like i said the wildlife is prevailant.

Gravelrash
05-08-2008, 03:21 AM
Well i intended to Quote a comment in one of the first posts here but have lost it now after reading 20 pages of posts.
Basically i am a Canadian GTer and i am armed when i am out there.I have kids and they are almost always with me and they are always armed with pocket knives and bows.We don't need to worry much about strange folk out in the bush although the threat is always there i suppose but we do have a very real threat of animals.If we don't see at least one bear a day something is wrong.The bears don't scare me much unless we happen along them with cubs but they generally are gone before we get too close.The wolves are much of a concern.The rattlers are a small concern but we havent had any trouble with them yet.The cougars on the other hand do scare me because they have been hunting and tracking you long before you know they are there.We run in to them every third or so trip out.But we have the dog and as long as you watch the signs you have enough warning to send out a warning shot and hopefully the cat gets the hint.

Cougars are the reason i carry my weapons.I wont shoot untill the threat is close enough to be a real threat,maybe 20 yrds or less.I have a rifle for the longer shots if needed,A shotgun for close shots,a bow for whatever and a machette for last resort.I walk with a cane so quickly removing myself from the threat is not an option.We had a close call a month or so back with a cat when we were exploring the Frenchman's mines but that is the only time i have felt threatened when exploring and like i said the wildlife is prevailant.

Just last night I was talking over my much-vaunted "American ghost town trip", with my daughter. She has become absolutely captivated with the beauty of Nth America since I started to get regular photos of gt's and the scenery surrounding them (many thanks Bad Bob! THE best "wallpaper" ever)....BUT.... she is scared of all those animals you mentioned, 230, and most particularly cougars!
We watched a few YouTube vids about cougars, people encountering them in their yards in Colorado, etc.
She is still ....unconvinced.... but I am captivated. Seeing a bear will be tremendous and something I look forward to very much. I am excited by you saying you see them every time you are out.
Seeing a cougar....wow, I'd be in Seventh Heaven. It will be the experience of a lifetime.


The cougars on the other hand do scare me because they have been hunting and tracking you long before you know they are there
You made my day. Best sentence of the year award!

Paladin
05-08-2008, 07:19 AM
I have lived and hunted in the Rockies from southern Utah north to Alaska and in my life, I've only seen 2 cougars. I have been close to them several times. I've found their fresh kills and tracks. A bear is more likely, but don't be disappointed when you don't see a lion. They are very elusive.

Mikejts
05-08-2008, 01:45 PM
Gravel,

To see them (Lions) is one thing, Hearing them and NOT seeing them is much worse. As you know, I live in Colorado and my worst experience with a mountain Lion was being in a steep ravine, heavy brush and hearing that snarl but not being able to locate the lion. It was right after that experience I decided to always carry.

jtkeefe
05-08-2008, 09:21 PM
Why not, if they threaten with a weapon?

Paladin
05-10-2008, 07:45 AM
Gravel,

To see them (Lions) is one thing, Hearing them and NOT seeing them is much worse. As you know, I live in Colorado and my worst experience with a mountain Lion was being in a steep ravine, heavy brush and hearing that snarl but not being able to locate the lion. It was right after that experience I decided to always carry.

Yeah, I had one of those experiences with a cougar near Cedar City, Utah. A friend and I camped in a small draw and while finding firewood came across a freshly killed fawn about 150-200 yards from camp. Because we had already set up camp we decided to stay, knowing full well there was a lion in the neighborhood. About 1 am we heard a screech outside camp. The fire had died down at that point and it was a little unnerving hearing the lion outside our camp. I fired a shot into the air with my .44 and began rebuilding the fire. We didn't hear from the lion again. Hindsight is 20/20 and we should have broke camp and found another spot away from the kill, but fortunately the lion wasn't annoyed enough with us to get any closer to our camp.

brian10x
05-10-2008, 08:50 AM
I had an experience last year that I still have a hard time talking about. I'm hoping to bring some sort of closure by relating the story and cleansing my soul of it all.

Just as I was leaving my house early one Sunday morning to go ghost town hunting, I heard a fierce, wild scream, catching me by surprise.

I quickly retreated back in the house, and in a cold sweat, considered my best options.

I knew this must be a beast of unbelievable fortitude, as my usual defence system of not bathing for weeks on end normally tends to keep predators away.

Arming myself with a 12ga shotgun, I kicked the front door open and raised the shotgun and drew a bead on the monster, now visible in the early sunrise.

The creature reared back in defiance, the acrid smell of death and the sound of pure **** from its jaws, then, in an instant, retreated to the far side of the driveway and continued its threatening posture.

Seeing this as a brief window of opportunity, I quickly grabbed my gear and ran to the Bronco, slamming the door and running all the windows up, as I floored it out of the driveway.

Looking back, the creature was no where in sight. I've never encountered this creature again, thank goodness, but the deeply embedded claw marks on the undercarriage are a clue to its determination and probable survival.

At some point in the confusion, I had the presence of mind to snap a quick photo of the beast before it disapearred. Looking at it now, still sends chills down my spine.

bad bob
05-10-2008, 09:38 AM
I had an experience last year that I still have a hard time talking about. I'm hoping to bring some sort of closure by relating the story and cleansing my soul of it all.

Just as I was leaving my house early one Sunday morning to go ghost town hunting, I heard a fierce, wild scream, catching me by surprise.

I quickly retreated back in the house, and in a cold sweat, considered my best options.

I knew this must be a beast of unbelievable fortitude, as my usual defence system of not bathing for weeks on end normally tends to keep predators away.

Arming myself with a 12ga shotgun, I kicked the front door open and raised the shotgun and drew a bead on the monster, now visible in the early sunrise.

The creature reared back in defiance, the acrid smell of death and the sound of pure **** from its jaws, then, in an instant, retreated to the far side of the driveway and continued its threatening posture.

Seeing this as a brief window of opportunity, I quickly grabbed my gear and ran to the Bronco, slamming the door and running all the windows up, as I floored it out of the driveway.

Looking back, the creature was no where in sight. I've never encountered this creature again, thank goodness, but the deeply embedded claw marks on the undercarriage are a clue to its determination and probable survival.

At some point in the confusion, I had the presence of mind to snap a quick photo of the beast before it disapearred. Looking at it now, still sends chills down my spine.



You did the right thing, Brian. Those cold steely eyes and razor sharp teeth are quite disarming. Death oozes from this creature. :eek:

DirtyDog
05-10-2008, 10:32 AM
C:\Documents and Settings\Tom\My Documents\bug#.JPGScared spit-less I was! I too know the feeling of coming face-to-face with a monster. It had huge, beady eyes that just dared me to fight. He had his dukes up in a defensive manner just ready to take a poke at me. And those wings of his-Wow, an avenging angel if ever I seen one! Lucky for me I had my camera ready, otherwise you GTers wouldn't believe a word I said. DD

Gravelrash
05-10-2008, 05:42 PM
I had an experience last year that I still have a hard time talking about. I'm hoping to bring some sort of closure by relating the story and cleansing my soul of it all.

Looking at it now, still sends chills down my spine.

Why does none of this surprise me?;)

Paladin and Mikejts, thanks for sharing those stories. I have to tell you, though..... they are NOT acting as deterents, if that was the idea. They are more like lures!
I would give my other leg to see .... naah, maybe not that keen!
However, Mike, you are on notice as to what I would really like to see!
That...and some of those nuggets! See if I can't off-set some of the costs of this trip!

I'm going "bush" tomorrow - just a day excursion. Lets see if I can find a kangaroo.... and watch it eat grass! Darn it.... if only they'd roar, or SOMETHING! All they do is look cute and then hop off where you can't follow.
The only danger, where I am going, is hillbillies, expensive gas and dropping out of cell-phone coverage!

brian10x
05-10-2008, 05:53 PM
Take pictures!

Whats ordinary to you is facinating to me!

Gravelrash
05-10-2008, 06:02 PM
Yeah, I had one of those experiences with a cougar near Cedar City, Utah. A friend and I camped in a small draw.

OK.... this is way off topic but, as it comes from a post in this thread, it seems sorta 'tidy' to me.
I have a question about geography, specifically geographic terms, as used in America.
Prizes will be awarded for the best answer......
What is a "draw"?
Also, is there a difference between a "gulch" and a "gully"?
For an additional prize....explain!:D

tuutuutango
05-10-2008, 08:19 PM
OK, I'll enter the contest if the prize is something other than a Fosters Lager or a Lone Star Beer. Can you spring for a Guiness Stout?



What is a "draw"?

Also, is there a difference between a "gulch" and a "gully"?:D

A "draw" is a common phrase used primarily in dryer regions of the Southwestern United States. It is similar to an aluvial flood plain, but smaller in scale. scope and size, "drawing" running water away from a gentle sloping lands. A draw can be very wide, perhaps several hundred yards wide.

A gully is something like a small ditch, but made by erosion and not man (as in Mother Nature) A gully is usually only a few feet or a few yards wide.

A gulch is a sound made by beer drinkers in Arkansas and parts of East Texas after the consumption of no less than three beers. Polite and educated people often refer to the escaping gas as "belch" but folks from Arkansas and East Texas interchange the word for Gulch, because it sounds similar to the sound "gulp" as they make massive "draws" on their beer. (There we go again with that word "draw." Let's not complicate this by interjecting "draw fer yer gun, you scallywag...")

The term "gulch" (as you seek clarification for) is used to describe an erosion somewhat larger (primarily deeper) than a gully. However, typically, a gulch is more often dryer than a gully. A gully can be in an area having more rain fall than a gulch. "As he rode his horse across the gully, he soon disappeared, horse and all in that deep gulch, just south of the draw."

In Texas, when we have a hard rain, we often call them "gully washers." A hard rain on a Texas cattle ranch is sometimes called a "turd floater" too, if lot's of cattle have been pooping out on the range.

Gravelrash... I hope this clarification helps and wins me a Guiness... record for bovine scathology.

Paladin
05-11-2008, 04:11 PM
Sorry Gravel! It's amazing in that I'm even talking to someone in Australia via the "magic box" computer (even as long as the internet's been around, it's still fascinating I'm chating with someone on the otherside of the globe!), so it's easy to speak "American" rather than the Queen's english! Yes, as defined by tuutuutanngo, a draw is similar to a very small canyon for lack of better term, and like he said this "draws" snowmelt, streams, etc from the surrounding hills.
PS- Don't think for a minute that I'm trying to scare you off with talk of bears and lions! Much like the great white sharks or crocodiles you have there, the odds of actually seeing one, let alone being attacked is so remote it's almost not worth mentioning.
If you get to southern Idaho and want to see some of our GT's, let me know! I'd be happy to show you around! (oh, and we have bears, both grizzly and black, as well as cougars and wolves here as well!)

tuutuutango
05-11-2008, 04:30 PM
If you get to southern Idaho and want to see some of our GT's, let me know! I'd be happy to show you around!

Let me know when Gravelrash makes it to Southern Idaho... I'll invite myself up. Spent some time in Boise, Caldwell and Pocatella. Man, nice country.

Mikejts
05-11-2008, 07:02 PM
Why does none of this surprise me?;)

Paladin and Mikejts, thanks for sharing those stories. I have to tell you, though..... they are NOT acting as deterents, if that was the idea. They are more like lures!
I would give my other leg to see .... naah, maybe not that keen!
However, Mike, you are on notice as to what I would really like to see!
That...and some of those nuggets! See if I can't off-set some of the costs of this trip!

I'm going "bush" tomorrow - just a day excursion. Lets see if I can find a kangaroo.... and watch it eat grass! Darn it.... if only they'd roar, or SOMETHING! All they do is look cute and then hop off where you can't follow.
The only danger, where I am going, is hillbillies, expensive gas and dropping out of cell-phone coverage!


While in the bush why aren't you nugget hunting. Got friends going there every year to nugget hunt.

Mikejts
05-11-2008, 07:11 PM
OK.... this is way off topic but, as it comes from a post in this thread, it seems sorta 'tidy' to me.
I have a question about geography, specifically geographic terms, as used in America.
Prizes will be awarded for the best answer......
What is a "draw"?
Also, is there a difference between a "gulch" and a "gully"?
For an additional prize....explain!:D


Want to be confused even more.?.. Here are some photos of what some people call "bluffs"
http://www.rockymountainprofiles.com/summit_springs_battlefield.htm

Paladin
05-12-2008, 04:50 AM
Or how about "coulees"?

bottlehouse.scott
05-12-2008, 07:51 PM
Have any of you spent time camping at old mine sites? There is something definitely creepy about being around all that machinery waaay in the middle of nowhere in the dark. Brings to mind an experience on the dirt back road from Big Pine CA to Death Valley and stopping to for the night at a hidden mine and seeing huge fresh mountain lion/cougar prints bigger than my hand and knowing NOBODY is coming on that road and if they did the car is hidden way off the road. Has anyone been to Queen Bee mine in the mountains of central CA ? With an iron door in the hillside, it looks more like a door to a crypt; totally isolated on a basic dead end narrow dirt road. Going to sleep in a nylon tent and wondering what if anything might just open up that door and look for company, or wondering more importantly when did all these dozens of used shotgun shells show up, and why?

GaryB
05-13-2008, 08:27 AM
Or how about "coulees"?

What's the difference between a plateau and a mesa?

Bob
05-13-2008, 01:07 PM
Just Size - A mesa is smaller, a butte is smaller than a mesa.

bad bob
05-13-2008, 04:17 PM
Or how about "coulees"?



Those were chinese immigrant laborers. :D

DirtyDog
05-13-2008, 04:46 PM
Mesa is Spanish for "table" and means a flat-topped mountain. There are all sizes of mesas.

A plateau is not a mountain but rather a geographical area that is raised up higher than its surrounds. An example in Idaho is the Snake River Plateau, which is apprx 400 mi by 150 mi in size. A butte is normally a pointed or rounded mtn.

A saddle looks like a saddle between two buttes or mesas.

A hogback is a ridge begining high on a mtn and dimishing in altitude as it radiates out and away from said mtn. It usually separates two valleys or gulches or dry washes. A Mesa could have 1 or more hogbacks. The top is called a ridge and the sides are called draws.

I also know the difference between a ship and a boat!

mainmanwalkin
05-13-2008, 09:01 PM
A potentially dangerous encounter I had once was up in north Florida, in a very scarcely populated area of Suwannee County. I didn't know it at the time, but we weren't too far from the ghost town of Ellaville.

We were camping on private property (my friends family owns it) out in the woods, and I remember in the middle of the night waking up to the sound of dogs barking in the distance. I thought they were wild dogs but then I heard the faint sound of truck engines and realized it was much worse --poachers!

Most likely it was a gang of drunken rednecks hunting deer or turkey or whatever else out in the woods. It could have been professional hunters too. For about a half hour I could here these dogs barking and hollering somewhere out in there in the night. I just prayed that they didnt run right smack into my tent or the hunters didn't "mistake" me for game and take a few shots.

I didnt look out of the tent to check if I could see their headlights or spotlights (if they had any), I just laid flat and waited. I think they came close at one point, but it was tough to know just how far away they were. I did hear a few shots but those were way off in the distance. Not too long after that all the noise stopped and I went back to sleep.

Just goes to show that dangerous situations can occur even on your own property.


Have any of you spent time camping at old mine sites? There is something definitely creepy about being around all that machinery waaay in the middle of nowhere in the dark. Brings to mind an experience on the dirt back road from Big Pine CA to Death Valley and stopping to for the night at a hidden mine and seeing huge fresh mountain lion/cougar prints bigger than my hand and knowing NOBODY is coming on that road and if they did the car is hidden way off the road. Has anyone been to Queen Bee mine in the mountains of central CA ? With an iron door in the hillside, it looks more like a door to a crypt; totally isolated on a basic dead end narrow dirt road. Going to sleep in a nylon tent and wondering what if anything might just open up that door and look for company, or wondering more importantly when did all these dozens of used shotgun shells show up, and why?

Gravelrash
05-13-2008, 09:11 PM
Those were chinese immigrant laborers. :D

And that....in case anyone was wondering....is why he is known as Bad Bob!:D

Gravelrash
05-13-2008, 09:18 PM
Tuutuutango -


"Gravelrash... I hope this clarification helps and wins me a Guiness."


First prize, mate. Second prize? Two more.
Here's a little plug for my favorite beer, seeing as how you like Guiness..... see if you can get ahold of some Coopers Sparkling Ale, made in South Australia. It is so good I don’t mind giving them a plug.
There's a theory about why such great beers emanate from South Oz - there's bugger all else to do except get on the turps!

Paladin - (that name scores very high on my nostalgia scale!)


"Sorry Gravel! It's amazing in that I'm even talking to someone in Australia via the "magic box"...."

I agree mate; this internet business has made an immense difference to my life, especially these days, which see me trapped in the “Mom and Pop” from 7am -8pm. What…WHAT… on God’s green earth made me think being a shopkeeper was a good idea?? I blame the morphine. I tell my wife and daughter all the time….it isn’t my fault. Who, in their right mind, listens to a man on morphine??? WHO? They did!

Anyway….. just being able to surf around and discover sites such as this one,(and several others I visit on related themes, such as Mike’s, Panamint Valley etc), has made life bearable and has increased my knowledge, excitement and adventure levels.... you name it. Google Earth has made me the world’s happiest armchair traveller! Heck, I’ve been to the top of Everest three times this year!
I've always had a "thing" about the USA, though. Here at GT.com, being able to communicate with people with such great knowledge about “the road less travelled”, ghost-towns and “all that” ..... it's fantastic and all thanks to the internet. Thanks to Al Gore, for inventing it!
As for the Queens English, I don’t know about that, at all. I used to think I spoke quite well…. until I went to England! Seems I really am from Irish convict stock!
Honestly, it took me ages to understand people over there - Scotland was a disaster. Thank God for a sense of humour!
As a some-time linguist, sometime ESL/TOEFL teacher, language interests me, especially accents, but actually being able to understand what is said to you still comes up trumps. The experience of not beiong understood wears thin after a while…….hence my fear of going to Alabama and Louisiana!
Anyway, I am happy if my accent gets called "mid-Pacific". (I bet not too many people know there is such a thing!)
Luckily, I grew up on a steady diet of American TV, so we should have no problems communicating. Especially after I’ve had a couple of cold ales!

“If you get to southern Idaho and want to see some of our GT's” – I think you can pencil that in!

Yet Another Bob -
"A mesa is smaller, a butte is smaller than a mesa."

That was my next question!! That, and "coulee", which saves me asking about Grand Coulee, I suppose??

Gravelrash
05-14-2008, 07:37 AM
While in the bush why aren't you nugget hunting. Got friends going there every year to nugget hunt.

Mike - I used to pan for gold a bit when I was younger and when I can catch up with my old mate Johnno we give his detector a decent workout but, since I went in for... "re-alignment".... I've not had more than one or two opportunities and I was not so interested in gold as I was in figuring out how to do it with one leg.
Not so easy but it can be done! Just looks very peculiar!

You have gold hunting buddies in Australia? Victoria, maybe?

Where I went, on Monday, is a very isolated place called Licola, which I use as a base for exploring the lower Alpine National Park. It is still a very new place for me and I absolutely love the rugged isolation up there. After a few months of "Do you want fries with that?".... I need it bad!
I am still limited by owning only a 2WD but I can get it into some pretty amazing predicaments. So far I've been able to get myself out of the 2 squeaky scrapes I've got myself into, which was lucky as there wasn't a soul around and there is no cell coverage. 6 or 7 miles on crutches..... not something I want to try. Kinda puts a thrill into driving those fire trails!
Still, it used to be an alluvial gold area, so when summer rolls around again......?:rolleyes:

ColBuck
10-07-2008, 01:21 PM
Sorry, but I'm new to posting. I am responding to a post about a guide who made customers nervous by carrying a gun on the tour.

My wife and I have been on several guided tours to ghost town areas and I am nervous when the guide doesn't have a gun. The more, the merrier!

Roadrunner
10-07-2008, 04:58 PM
The worst was Petaca, NM. My wife and I drove through there to visit some old mica mines.

The town was about 20 miles of US 285, on a really rugged forestry road. Right before the mines, we came to the "town" (about 15 or 20 shacks, some adobe), of Petaca.

It seemed like every person in the town came out of their houses, and stood next to the road staring at us. Most were dressed in what I would call dirty rags. The stares were not friendly, we waved but no one waved back.

When I got to the Mica mines (which are truly spectacular) my wife told me she did not want to go back to the town, and I had a bad feeling too. I usually pack an unconcealed 9MM when we go out in the remote areas, but we hadn't really planned to go there, we were on the way back from a nice resort up in Chama when I remembered seeing the place in a mining guide.

It was about a 20-30 miles rough 4WD road to detour and it was getting dark, so we just rolled up the windows and drove back like we were on a bombing mission when we went back through town.

Nothing happened, and I really would hate to think badly of the people in this town, but I would not go back there without other vehicles and being personally armed.

Maybe they just don't get much company.

Mikejts
10-08-2008, 10:41 AM
I have run into a few Deliverance types in the mountains out here in Colorado. Always glad I have my 357 handy.

One time I was exploring an old mill and looked off into the forest. Saw a log cabin in good shape barely visible amongst the trees. I decide to investigate. When I got to the door I pulled it open only to see, let's just say a person, sitting in the corner of the cabin with a can of beans in one hand and a finger full of beans headed towards his mouth through a beard as thick as Santa's. Yes, I said a finger full. No silverware here. His eyes got about as big as saucers and I am sure mine did also. :eek: As I spied the rifle next to his shoulder I quickly said "excuse me" pulled the door shut and dashed through the trees.

mainmanwalkin
10-09-2008, 08:42 PM
Even with alligators and snakes and the occasional bobcat I'm much more wary and watchful of bums and vagrants.

Thankfully we've never encountered one in an old house or spot out in the woods we were exploring but the possibility is always in the back of my mind.

Did have something of an unsettling occurance while walking around at a ghost town site a couple years back. After finding all sorts of little remains of what appeared to be an old factory and old knocked down houses we circled back to leave as the sun was going down.

Not too far from the car was an old abandoned two-story house with a couple beat up sheds behind it. We got to the first shed and were surprised to find it was stocked full of car rims. Not old rusted ones but shiny new "gangster" rims. With that we headed back to the car in quick fashion and got out of there.

A few minutes after we'd driven away my girlfriend told me she saw someone on the second floor of the old house looking at us.

Tommyknocker
10-09-2008, 09:55 PM
Its better to have a gun and not need it, then to need a gun and not have it! God made all men equal. Samuel Colt made some men more equel than others...

campp
10-10-2008, 04:51 AM
A few years ago we went to see Reymert AZ. We had 3 vehicles, and got lost (easy in that area). Suddenly, we found a guy in a new jogging suit, 15 miles from the pavement! He politely pointed down a road where we should go. He sure as heck didn't want us going up one particular road, and conviced us it was impassable. But he did know where Reymert was (???). As we pulled away, I noticed a wire going into his ear. Looking back at him (I wasn't driving) I could see him talking into a microphone as he shlepped back into a shadow. Another in our party saw the same thing.

Later on that day, as I drove out of the area by myself, I was suddently being followed by a large black SUV. It shadowed me for miles. If I stopped to take a picture or pee, they would stop just out of sight. I got suspicious, and quickly drove back towards them to see what would happen. They turned and raced away in other direction. I decided I was in WAY over my head, and beat it out to the highway. They followed me all the way to the pavement and then turned back, disappearing into the desert.

Government activity? Cops doing a sting? Meth lab? Not sure, but something was going on up that canyon...

Albin
10-20-2008, 06:51 AM
When my son and I go out ghost town hunting, we always carry firearms.

I carry a Glock M-23 in .40 S&W and my son carries my AR-15 Carbine, mostly 'cause he really likes shooting jackrabbits (see pic below).

In some ghost towns, you have to be careful when driving into them. Some are obviously have been empty for years and no one lives there - so no problem - from residents anyway. That always leaves other people that aren't there for legal reasons. Meth heads are one, mary jane growers are another - Anyone recall reading about those three USFS people being hijacked in North Nevada by illiegal drug runners? All the reason I need to be armed.

Some ghost towns aren't - good examples are Tybo, NV in central NV and Marietta, west central NV. Both have people living in them and I would wager that those residents live there to get AWAY from crowds and strangers. Now, those residents don't pose a risk to you or anyone else unless you just bungle on in without realizing your trespassing on people that really don't like being trespassed on. Being armed in this situation can get you killed real quick - hence why my son and I drive into any ghost town very, very slowly looking for anything out of the ordinary. My mantra to my son was: " Look for vehicles, people or [no trespassing] signs".

Pics from our 2008 Summer Desert Trip, with many trips to several ghost towns: http://www.rocketcityrockcrawlers.com/pubpics/2008_Summer_Desert_Trip/2008_SDT.htm



http://www.rocketcityrockcrawlers.com/pubpics/2008_Summer_Desert_Trip/Al_08_10/07-21-08-16-24-46_IMG_1103_Al.JPG_s.jpg

David A. Wright
10-22-2008, 09:28 PM
That always leaves other people that aren't there for legal reasons. Meth heads are one, mary jane growers are another - Anyone recall reading about those three USFS people being hijacked in North Nevada by illiegal drug runners? All the reason I need to be armed.
Winnemucca, Nevada The Humboldt Sun, Tuesday, October 14, 2008
“BLM WORKERS HELD AT GUNPOINT AFTER CHANCING UPON LARGE MARIJUANA GARDEN: AUTHORITIES CONFISCATE PLANTS WORTH AN ESTIMATED $5 MILLION”
by Martin Griffith – The Associated Press

RENO – Three federal biologists were held at gunpoint by suspected members of a Mexican drug cartel after chancing upon a large marijuana garden on a remote stretch of public land in northern Nevada, authorities said Friday.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management workers were released unharmed after being held by three armed men late Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 7, in a high-desert area about 200 miles northeast of Reno near Winnemucca, said JoLynn Worley, an agency spokeswoman.

Law enforcement authorities returned to the scene Oct. 8 and found the suspects had fled, leaving behind a makeshift camp that indicated as many as six people were involved.

Authorities confiscated nearly 800 mature marijuana plants with an estimated $5 million and about 150 pounds of processed buds, BLM officials said.

It marks the discovery of the third such garden believed to involve a Mexican drug cartel on BLM-managed lands in Nevada this year, she said. The others in southern Nevada did not involve confrontations. Many marijuana gardens have been found in the past on public land in Nevada and elsewhere across the West.

“This marks the first time in Nevada that BLM employees have actually come upon people (at a marijuana garden) and had been threatened,” Worley said. “I’m not aware of it in any other Western state, either.”

The unarmed biologists were conducting a stream survey when they encountered three male Hispanics and the pot garden, which stretched for nearly a mile along the North Fork Little Humboldt River, authorities said. Law enforcement officers said two men carried handguns and the third had a rifle with a scope on it. Investigators did not say why they suspected the men were part of a Mexican drug cartel.

After a tense 10-minute standoff, the BLM employees were told they could leave but ordered to go in the opposite direction because the armed men said there were other people in the direction the BLM workers where headed, Worley said.

The male BLM employees retreated and hid until darkness fell. They were picked up late Tuesday night by a BLM search party as they walked along a gravel road toward the community of Paradise Valley, she said.

“I know they were shaken, and it was certainly a very frightening encounter,” Worley said.

The employees, whose names were not released, met with a councelor, she said.

The BLM, the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office and the Nevada Department of Public Safety Investigative Division were investigating.

The BLM, which manages most of Nevada’s land, warned the public to be aware of their surroundings in remote areas.

“Basically, any area that is out of the way and has water could be potentially a place for people to grow a pot garden,” Worley said.

Albin
10-24-2008, 05:30 AM
That's it.

David A. Wright
10-24-2008, 09:43 AM
A lot of us locals like to prowl the inviting backroads and trails to favorite hunting spots or to explore. This event has got everyone really angry. And then there's actually people who live very near where the incident occured.

I'm seeing a rise in numbers of local 4x4 pickups and SUVs parked at the stores or other places with rifles or shotguns laying on the seat or in the floor, and they're not in cases either.

AlyStar
01-01-2009, 09:10 PM
I'm not sure if carrying a gun would have helped, and I wasn't in a ghost town per se: but while traveling down the coastal highways 101 and 1, hitting up older cemeteries with a girlfriend from London, we were accosted by a knife wielding psycho in the coastal town of Mendocino CA. We'd been reading the headstones, with great respect, however they were surrounded by square footage (like patio sized) layers of cement and my friend stepped upon one to be able to read the headstone. Almost immediately a woman drove her Volvo Station wagon into the cemetery and proceeded to do donuts at an outrageous speed for a cemetery. Maybe my friend ticked her off by stepping onto the platform, we'll never know. She got out and glared at us, but we continued to read. After ranting loudly about how she'd carved these headstones herself (though she was easily only 30 and the last stone was 1950) and it was her cemetery, that we were sluts and unworthy, I decided to back out. She was obviously out of it.
My friend, a good 'Essex' girl and up for a fight, stood her ground (though I pled with her to leave). She finally started walking out and the woman walked up behind her and kicked her in the back and when my friend turned to confront her, pulled out a big pocket knife and chased her out of the yard.

However, I was still standing at the entrance and as my friend ran screaming 'run, she has a knife' the woman broke off and started chasing me into traffic of the small town. I fell into a pile of garbage cans and grabbed a lid as a shield since she was looming over me with the knife pointed at me in a downward thrusting position (it was a small knife but I don't want to be stabbed, period). She stepped back to retrieve my camera which had been dropped and lobbed it into the air and told me that I should appreciate my life more seriously now, because I didn't know how much trouble I'd been in. She ran away and at the gate of the cemetery, lifted her shirt to show us her rack and said '*****es, you can't have these!' (obviously crazy). We went into a cafe and made a statement with the local sheriff. He found her a day later (by that time we were well south) face down in the sand, drunk and high, and complaining that she'd been gang-raped by partiers on the beach. He said she was a drifter, but that our complaint was overshadowed by the fact that she may have been raped (he didn't know if that was a ruse or not) but promised me she'd be put in a psychiatric hold until they could figure it out. I believe pressing charges required our return to mendocino and so we did not.

Needless to say, I was never able to get my friend to go back into any of the gorgeous cemeteries up and down the coastline, however I still visit them no matter how remote. Ghost-Town Cemeteries are the BEST!!! Lots of people hanging around and not a sound!!:rolleyes:

Mikejts
01-02-2009, 06:12 AM
I recently took a trip to Aroya. I had been there almost a year ago to the day. Only that time it was night and I was not able to see much in the dark. It was in the middle of the Colorado Plains without even a moon. This time it was a bright sunshine filled day. As I was wondering around I noticed a snake skin. I did not think much of it but I did stop to pick it up and see if it looked like the skin from a rattler. A quick look told me YES. It was probably the skin from a Prairie Rattler (http://www.rockymountainprofiles.com/Prairie%20rattlesnake.htm). In any case I continued exploring and then became extremely cautious as I noticed several more skins. After I stopped counting at 18 skins I got seriously nervous. The majority were at least four feet in length. At least one over six feet. All in an empty lot between two old buildings. A space perhaps 20 by 40. Now I know snakes can shed more than once a year and sometimes even three times a year. That still left me with at least 6 snakes to worry about. Thank the good Lord it was winter and they typically do go into hibernation. In any case I did not see any. You can bet that if I go back in the spring I will be extra cautious. Be warned if you go to watch your step.

danbo
01-02-2009, 06:27 AM
I'm not sure if carrying a gun would have helped,

Yup, it would have, ( if it were me ).
Fact 1. Crazy person acts crazy with a vehicle. A credible witness is standing by.
Fact 2. Crazy person makes verbal threat.
Fact 3. Crazy person commits assault by kicking someone in the back.
Fact 4. Crazy person displays a weapon and attemps an actual leathal assault.

Result: bang bang, I'm going to court for 2 years but I'm huggin my wife and kids and not taking a dirt nap.

Every situation is different. I'm glad you were not hurt. Guns are good if you know when and how to use them.
( And have "will" to ).

( Rawhide theme )
"Don't try and understand'em, Just rope throw and brand'em".:D

High Desert Drifter
01-03-2009, 09:50 AM
I'm not sure if carrying a gun would have helped, and I wasn't in a ghost town per se: but while traveling down the coastal highways 101 and 1, hitting up older cemeteries with a girlfriend from London, we were accosted by a knife wielding psycho in the coastal town of Mendocino CA. We'd been reading the headstones, with great respect, however they were surrounded by square footage (like patio sized) layers of cement and my friend stepped upon one to be able to read the headstone. Almost immediately a woman drove her Volvo Station wagon into the cemetery and proceeded to do donuts at an outrageous speed for a cemetery. Maybe my friend ticked her off by stepping onto the platform, we'll never know. She got out and glared at us, but we continued to read. After ranting loudly about how she'd carved these headstones herself (though she was easily only 30 and the last stone was 1950) and it was her cemetery, that we were sluts and unworthy, I decided to back out. She was obviously out of it.
My friend, a good 'Essex' girl and up for a fight, stood her ground (though I pled with her to leave). She finally started walking out and the woman walked up behind her and kicked her in the back and when my friend turned to confront her, pulled out a big pocket knife and chased her out of the yard.

However, I was still standing at the entrance and as my friend ran screaming 'run, she has a knife' the woman broke off and started chasing me into traffic of the small town. I fell into a pile of garbage cans and grabbed a lid as a shield since she was looming over me with the knife pointed at me in a downward thrusting position (it was a small knife but I don't want to be stabbed, period). She stepped back to retrieve my camera which had been dropped and lobbed it into the air and told me that I should appreciate my life more seriously now, because I didn't know how much trouble I'd been in. She ran away and at the gate of the cemetery, lifted her shirt to show us her rack and said '*****es, you can't have these!' (obviously crazy). We went into a cafe and made a statement with the local sheriff. He found her a day later (by that time we were well south) face down in the sand, drunk and high, and complaining that she'd been gang-raped by partiers on the beach. He said she was a drifter, but that our complaint was overshadowed by the fact that she may have been raped (he didn't know if that was a ruse or not) but promised me she'd be put in a psychiatric hold until they could figure it out. I believe pressing charges required our return to mendocino and so we did not.

Needless to say, I was never able to get my friend to go back into any of the gorgeous cemeteries up and down the coastline, however I still visit them no matter how remote. Ghost-Town Cemeteries are the BEST!!! Lots of people hanging around and not a sound!!:rolleyes:

I'm sorry about that; we here in California have been trying to keep Diane Feinstein under control now for years! However it could have been worse... She usually makes her rounds with Nancy Pelosi

LauraA
01-03-2009, 05:45 PM
i'm sorry about that; we here in california have been trying to keep diane feinstein under control now for years! However it could have been worse... She usually makes her rounds with nancy pelosi

lol!!!!! 2045

David A. Wright
01-03-2009, 07:34 PM
I'm sorry about that; we here in California have been trying to keep Diane Feinstein under control now for years! However it could have been worse... She usually makes her rounds with Nancy Pelosi
Now that one just MADE my day ... :D

Rupe
01-05-2009, 10:09 AM
That was funny!!!

I care a .38spl with +P's in it. I also carry a .44mag with a scope at times. (I'm a handgun hunter). I'm also an ex-cop and I see no reason not to carry a firearm when you are out and about in the back country. Just make sure you know how and when to use it. Remember you have to be really truely afraid for your life or someone elses before you can shoot them. Learn your gun law in the state your in.
I don't worry to much about people, but I keep my eyes open and aware of my surroundings. We have a major meth and pot problem here in Oregon and the portable labs these guys are using means they can be down any road or trail. The pot growers use booby traps to protect thier crops. Things that go boom! Becareful where you walk when you are off the well used trails or going cross country. Just a few words for everyones safety. I'll get off my soap box now. Thanks for listening oops I mean reading. LOL rupe

45-70Ranger
01-05-2009, 10:26 AM
Rupe,that's a +1 with the booby traps.
To be a little OT with this:
I was going upstream from Purdon Crossing to Edward's Crossing,using the side river trail.(South Yuba River),
I came upon a sign just off to the side
"No Trespassing".I stopped,not going any further.This trail is supposed to be open to the public.And was situated in the National Forest,north of Nevada City.
Figured,there had to be a pot farmer.And booby traps.
Disgretion is the better part of valor.
Backtracked with no problem.
I did report this to the ranger station.

Rupe
01-05-2009, 10:43 AM
Rupe,that's a +1 with the booby traps.
To be a little OT with this:
I was going upstream from Purdon Crossing to Edward's Crossing,using the side river trail.(South Yuba River),
I came upon a sign just off to the side
"No Trespassing".I stopped,not going any further.This trail is supposed to be open to the public.And was situated in the National Forest,north of Nevada City.
Figured,there had to be a pot farmer.And booby traps.
Disgretion is the better part of valor.
Backtracked with no problem.
I did report this to the ranger station.

That was no doubt the best thing to do. Being overly cuirious can get you hurt or worse. rupe

45-70Ranger
01-07-2009, 02:01 PM
Yep Rupe,I wouldn't feel very comfortable in a body bag.
Some months back,I was watching a program in the Kings N.F./National Park.
(East of Fresno)
Basic description of the program was about pot farmers in the forests.
Some guy was going fishing.
He came across some BG with a shotgun.
The BG asked the guy for his license.
Then said,"Don't come back.I know where you live."
The guy said he's never going back,from the interview.
Seems like now,you really have to watch the area you are going in.:eek:

Rupe
01-07-2009, 04:55 PM
Yep they are out there and you do want to use caution when wondering around out there.


rupe

crumbsucka
01-07-2009, 08:38 PM
Hey Everyone,

Kinda new at this, but so far Ive visited Wallpack Center in Sussex County, NJ but im looking for some more abandoned towns around NJ and basically there locations best described so I could find them. if anyone on here is pretty familiar with any towns around NJ, please message me with some info Id greatly appreciate it!

45-70Ranger
01-10-2009, 02:14 PM
Might try http://www.lostdestinations.com/ .
They explore nearly everything.

JoeZona
01-10-2009, 05:28 PM
Might try http://www.lostdestinations.com/ .
They explore nearly everything.


They did until November 2006, anyway. Then they became a lost destination

roadcam
01-23-2009, 08:55 AM
amazing, that after 25 pages of posts, I find maybe 4-5 interesting stories ON TOPIC, and the other 24 pages of "I carry lots of guns" horsecrap (I carry, too, but that's not what the thread is supposedly about) :(

Rupe
01-23-2009, 10:46 AM
amazing, that after 25 pages of posts, I find maybe 4-5 interesting stories ON TOPIC, and the other 24 pages of "I carry lots of guns" horsecrap (I carry, too, but that's not what the thread is supposedly about) :(

Maybe there weren't anymore stories so the topic was changed.:D

45-70Ranger
02-01-2009, 12:48 PM
amazing, that after 25 pages of posts, I find maybe 4-5 interesting stories ON TOPIC, and the other 24 pages of "I carry lots of guns" horsecrap (I carry, too, but that's not what the thread is supposedly about) :(
Check the number of posts,compared to your 5 posts........;) Any clues ? :rolleyes:

Rupe
02-01-2009, 03:56 PM
Check the number of posts,compared to your 5 posts........;) Any clues ? :rolleyes:

:eek:---:D

teds280z
02-02-2009, 07:08 PM
Everyone knows we are always on track. Which track is yet to be decided:rolleyes:

Rupe
02-02-2009, 07:13 PM
That's why I have a GPS, but it doesn't seem to work when I'm on here!:D

Hobo2
02-04-2009, 10:05 AM
I too have experienced two scary events in the wilderness. My first scary story begins in the High Uintah Mountains, located in the north eastern part of Utah… near a primitive area, and coincidentally my first ghost town discovery of the still standing town of Blacks Fork.

Me and my wife were young then (back in the 70’s), and not real savvy yet as to how to protect ourselves from the dangers of the wilds. We did know there were things out there that could hurt us, but thought little about it until this night. We were also poor then and could not afford the luxuries of a trailer, so we made do with a tent… in some ways I miss those good-old-days. Anyway, it was late on about our third night out, and we were all snuggled into our two man sleeping bag and fast asleep… well I was until… I got the rib poke from my wife. You know that poke she does with her elbow into your ribs and says, “Honey there is something out there”. Well us “tough men” don’t worry too much about little noises in the night, so I said something like, “it’s probably a mouse rummaging around, go back to sleep”, which I did is short order. The next sharp painful poke to my ribs, ripped me right out of my sleep. This time in a loud demanding whisper she said, “HONEY, GET UP, THERE IS SOMETHING BIG OUT THERE!” Now like any guy I knew it was nothing, so I was a little aggravated at the whole thing, but I listened this time to at least prove her wrong… THEN I HEARD IT!!! If you have been in the mountains much, you know the difference between a twig snap, and the clunk of a branch braking… the latter is what I heard! Now my skin is crawling and I feel that familiar cold rush of fear come over me. This is a big animal… I’m thinking to myself, nothing small could have broken such a branch. As quietly as I could, I found the flashlight and carefully unzipped the tent door. I peeked out and pointed the flashlight beam in as many directions as I could, without getting out of the tent… getting out would make me fair game for the monster roaming around out there in the dark.

Needless to say we never slept that night. I never did spot what was making the noise in any of my repeated attempts to do so, which went on all night. The thoughts of something tearing through our tent and attacking us kept us awake and still haunt me today… the “Blair Which Project” was hard for me to watch because of this. And because of this, I have developed a fear of bears, which is the theme of my next scary story.

The next morning, we did investigate and found the tracks and the cause of our nights fear, it was a beaver. He had fallen a small tree about 40 feet from our tent… this explains the first biggest clunk. Then he proceeded to gnaw off branches and drag them, one by one, right by our tent and down to his dam, which explains the other loud popping sounds throughout the night which moved around. In my panic state, when I’d shine the flashlight out the tent door, it was elevated… I was looking for something “BIG” remember. I just didn’t think to shine the beam on the ground for something small, like an annoying nocturnal beaver just doing his thing.

Now I know you’re all laughing at us by now, as we have over this story for many years. I just had to share this, because most of what we fear is all in our minds… as I assume most of these stories will reflect in this thread.

If you would like to hear the other story let me know and I will post it. I didn’t want to hog this whole thread by posting them both right now, especially if this is too far off topic and if you’re not that interested.

Rupe
02-04-2009, 10:52 AM
Great story, I have had lots of things that have gone bump in the night. A herd of Elk, a Deer licking my sleeping bag, etc etc Yep I know that fear! LOL
Go ahead and post the other story, that's what it here for.

rupe