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View Full Version : Those miners were made of strong stuff!



brian10x
07-09-2006, 01:35 PM
I was planning on another trek to Black Diamond here in Southern Arizona today, but I got a late start because I wanted to do a little yard work first.

So, two hours later, nearly passed out from the heat and wiped out for the rest of the day, I'm sipping a cool drink in air-conditioned comfort, my two dogs licking the sweat from my brow, and I start to ponder the steel these old time miners were made of.

These guys used to pound holes in solid rock in the same heat, most of the day, with very little water, crappy food, dangerous conditions, and in most cases, very little rewards at the end of the day.

Sometimes, searching for these mines, sitting on my padded seat, iced beverages strapped nearby, I lose sight of the superhuman effort expended to carve out so many holes in the ground, and the resulting lives lost or cut dramatically short by the struggle.

The next time I find a mine, I hope I remember to pause a few minutes to close my eyes and try to imagine the reality of life back then. The hardships must have been beyond our imagination.

BS
Soft, fleshy, not worthy to tread where they have...

:mad: :mad: :mad:

NWNative
07-09-2006, 02:17 PM
Interesting thought.
When I am out at a GT, enjoying the peace and quiet, I think about how it must have sounded. We once found a 60 stmap mill in the hills. Imagine those stmaps running day and night, echoing off of the hills.
We don't have your heat here. Our miners would have had rain and cold and wet. While I do my GTing in the nice and (usually) dry summer.

They had to have been tough.
I've got a book that my great grandma wrote about homesteading in Alaska, delivering mail by wagon in Nebraska as a kid and other things she did. It wasn't just the miners that were tough! Those frontier women could have kicked our a$$!!

LauraA
07-09-2006, 05:59 PM
I often think about the hardiness of those early miners and settlers too. Heck, I can't even walk out to the mailbox without gasping and panting on one of these 108 degree days here. Imagine wearing heavy long dresses or heavy wool or sack cloth pants and not even being able to get an ice cold drink whenever you want to.
It's hard to comprehend the everyday hardships these folks endured, not to mention illness and injuries sustained in their every day lives. (most of the cures I've read about seemed to include heavy doses of kerosene and sugar and for those who would admit to it, a shot of whiskey also helped) Wonder what they'd think if they could see the way things have changed?
I love reading their stories, it's about as adventurous as I get in this miserably hot weather.
There are a couple of good books available describing in detail the daily lives of these hardy souls.
One is "Filaree" written by Marguerite Noble. The other is "The Pioneer Woman of Gila County, Arizona and Their Descendants" compiled by the Daughters of the Gila County Pioneers. We purchased ours' at the local Tonto Nat'l Forest visitors center but they're also available from Git A Rope Publishing, Art And Antiques Inc. (http://www.gitarope.com/More_Books/index.html)
I find that some of these more obscure books offer a wealth of information, both historical and rhetorical.

NWNative
07-09-2006, 07:40 PM
Yeah.
I have some copies of great gama's recipies - including how to make a mustard plaster!
I am in awe of the people who traveled across country to a place they'd never seen with the whole family and everything they needed to start a new life in a little covered wagon. Last time we moved it took two trips in a 24' U-haul. And I didn't need to start a new life, build a house, raise livestock and all the rest!!

It's amazing that us decendents are even here!

High Desert Drifter
07-10-2006, 06:23 PM
talk about medicine and becoming ill, you should see some of the OBGYN tools they used to use down at the musuem in Virginia City. OOUUCH !!

LauraA
07-10-2006, 08:30 PM
Is THAT what those were? I thought they were miner's tools :eek:


(I didn't really say that did I?)

GaryB
07-10-2006, 10:03 PM
Is THAT what those were? I thought they were miner's tools :eek:



(I didn't really say that did I?)


Well times were hard so they had to improvise and recycle.

HollyDolly
10-12-2006, 06:47 AM
:cool: I recall my dad telling about my great grandmother going up to the Yukon to pan for gold.
She left New York with my grandfather and great uncle Fred to look for gold.I have forgotten some of the details,since it's been many years.But a prospector who had a claim near hers was murdered,no doubt for his gold.And when they went back to New York on the boat,great grandma told the two boys,she didn't have enough money,so they would have to work their passage.Both Great Uncle Fred,and especially my grandfather believed she had plenty of money,but just didn't want to pay for them so they worked on the ship.
She wasn't a widow.She was married and had a total of nine kids eventually.She was a german woman with an iron will,and I guess great grandpa just let her do her own thing while he ran a store and took care of the other kids at home,who were my great aunts.Family joke was she only came home to get pregnant,since she went to one of the Oklahoma land rushes,and other places.
Took a lot of guts for a woman to do that in those days.

LauraA
10-12-2006, 04:41 PM
This link has some really good reading about how women played an important role in western settlement as well as setting milestones in the development of the USA. Although this particular site hasn't been updated in a few years,the info and links are really good ones. It's part of the "My Hero" project.
Yep, the early miners were made of tough stuff, but behind them there was probably an equally strong women saying, "C'mon darlin' drill that dang rock hole and make us rich." ;)



The My Hero Project - Women Heroes (http://myhero.com/myhero/hero.asp?hero=Women_West)
Of the Early West (http://myhero.com/myhero/hero.asp?hero=Women_West)

Bob
10-12-2006, 08:53 PM
Laura - One of my old west heros is a lady named Bridget Mason. You may not find much on her if you use her real name but do a goggle search on Biddie Mason for grins.

LauraA
10-13-2006, 04:55 AM
Bob, you're right about Biddy Mason. I've read about her and she was an interesting character! If I'm not mistaken, there's a park in Los Angeles named after her. She was a mover and shaker well before Rosa Parks took her historic stand on a city bus. :)



Here's a link with information about her for those who may not recognize the name Bridget "Biddy" Mason.


Bridget "Biddy" Mason (http://www.distinguishedwomen.com/biographies/mason-b.html)

brian10x
01-13-2007, 09:05 PM
Jeez, I've become soft and worthless in my declining years!

The Sammi is trail ready, set up to tow out of town, and my employer has seen fit to grant me the ocasional weekend off.

But its kinda cold right now, it sorta hurts when the wind hits my face, and the heater don't work too good.

Can you just try to imagine how it might have been in one of our ghost towns right about now?

Now its not bad here in Arizona, but its cold as heck and snowing in a lot of places.

Just imagine being cold all night, dirty from not bathing, and stomach full of whiskey and beans creating acid reflux nasty enough to burn a hole in stainless steel.

With your credit already cut off at the general store, you have no choice but to bundle up and drag yourself to your claim.

You are a good man, God fearing and generally law abiding. You are tough as nails and strong as a horse, but as your aching arms grasp the worn handle of your pick axe and the pick breaks off on frozen rock, you have reached the very limit of your endurance.

With no more than a strong cup of cowboy coffee to urge you on, you slowly stumble towards town, and , without a trace of remorse or emotion, use your broken pick axe to bash in the brains of the first person you see walking alone.

The meager proceeds bring you a few days supplies and a bottle or two of whiskey, no longer a luxury, but a necessary evil you rely on more and more to help erase the memories of your desperate crime.

Outlaws in the old West? Heck, conditions as they were, I'm surprised everyone didn't resort to crime at one time or another.

Shoot. Some ghost town explorer I am, sipping espresso in a heated house, belly full of rotisserie chicken and iced tea.

Goat
01-14-2007, 07:44 AM
Jeez Brian, that brings it all into perspective doesn't it! The last part of 2006 was pretty crappy for me (broken ribs, a couple of ER trips and surgeries, and something at work hit the fan and left everyone brown-tinged, companywide), and I sorta made a resolution NOT to post until I had made a discovery of some type, that might be of interest to others.

Now I've got a couple days off, but I'm waiting for warmer weather to do some explorin'! Jeez, I'm a wimp...

Goat
01-14-2007, 08:23 AM
DISCOVERY: I bought some shake lights at Bass Pro Shop, on a lark. I figured maybe for an emergency type situation, they'd be OK. Lets just say....they DO cast light, just not lots of it. I shook one up for a while and walked into the dark silence of the garage to test it. After a minute or so, I heard a faint tapping at the flashlight lens and looked down. Sure enough, there was an aged moth, wearing dark sunglasses with a seeing-eye mosquito on the end of a leash, tapping the lens with a cane. I asked him why he wasn't with his friends dining on clothes at the GOODWILL, or something. He replied: "I'm old and don't see too well, but I like to venture out and find stuff to explore this time of year, even if it isn't particularly bright OR interesting. It makes me feel a little bit younger and it keeps the fire burning, so to speak". I turned off the light and went inside, and as I was closing the door, I heard a faint curse as he bumped into his reflection on the truck.

*Cue the "Wonder Years" music and narration; "That night, I learned that it was important to pursue the hobby that you love, no matter what the weather is like or how crappy you feel. I learned to stop procrastinating and finding excuses, and that getting out and doing something will put everything else in your life into perspective.

I also learned that I'm about as bright as a Bass Pro Shop shake light...;)

Goat.

GaryB
01-14-2007, 08:37 AM
What is this, revaluations hour?

Other than having the season crud and my bronchitis fighting me, I've been busy busting butt on getting the house fixed up. But it's all in good reason, as the faster the house gets done, the sooner I can sell it and move to a better place away from this cess pool :D

Goat
01-14-2007, 09:03 AM
Where ya headed to, Gary?

GaryB
01-14-2007, 10:01 AM
Where ya headed to, Gary?


Either Elko or the Pioche-Caliente area. We we're thinking Ely too, but it's to far away from everything. I finally got my NDOT job so I can at least have a job and likely transfer. My wife is lucky, she's a special ed. teacher and is in demand pretty much everywhere.

Elko has everything, but it's down right miserable there in the winter and unless I'm working indoors, I don't want any part of it. Plus transfers to there are harder as they have fewer staff.

I'm leaning toward Pioche-Caliente. It's still away from everything, but it's closer than Ely. It's an hour to Cedar City, UT and 2 to Vegas for monthly shopping, and I have more family there than Elko. And if they get that place in Coyote Springs built (which I really, really, really hope they don't) we'd have even closer services.

I've just gotten burned out of this place, I don't know how Bob has done it for so long. Plus it makes sense as I'm always GT'ing, off-roading, hunting, etc. and I'd have all that in my own back yard up there, as opposed to having to drive to it like down here.

I already told my wife that where ever we move too, we're getting a 4X4 quad or side X side to go where my SII can't, and she'll probably never see me again if she doesn't come along as I'll be finding out where every dirt road goes too :D

Goat
01-14-2007, 10:21 AM
Oh man, Caliente is my vision of paradise! My wife teaches first grade here, and I work with adults with developmental disabilities in a work program. I just assumed that we were "unmarketable" in that part of the state, due to its smaller population. Good luck with this, let us know what you find out job wise.

I'm with you on the Ely thing, I don't like the cold!

Goat

GaryB
01-14-2007, 12:52 PM
Teachers are big everywhere, especially rural, where they likely would make more money than here :rolleyes:
As for your position, I'm not sure there is a huge demand in that area, but I'm sure across the state there may be. You might even be able to use your skills in a similar situation, like at juvenile detentions centers, like the one in Caliente.

I used to have some good state job posting links, besides the official state one, that you could look by location and job. But once I got my employment, I dumped them :o


What school does your wife teach at?

LauraA
01-14-2007, 02:37 PM
True confessions huh. Well, the crud's got me too, can't put a name to it, just a general achy feeling that doesn't seem to develop into anything further. BUT, being stubborn, hardheaded and tenacious, I'm not giving in to whatever's trying to nail me. The colder temps are perfect for explorations.
We're still out on an almost daily basis and still trying to reach the $##!! Journigan Mine. The forest service map is dead wrong, the road they've got marked isn't in the right location. We've finally got it exactly pinned down as far as the location goes, but hiking to it takes some real stamina, something I'm lacking right now. If this dadgum mine was a lead mine, how the heck did they haul anything into or out of it? There aren't any roads going directly to it and from the looks of the terrain, there never was a road. The existing road stops about a mile from the mine and from there, it's an uphill hike, climbing over boulders, dense growth and a thriving wall-to-wall briar and cactus garden. It's the most forbidding mile you can imagine.
I'm convinced that these miners were not only hardy souls, but they had to be obsessed with the idea of making money and a wee bit nutty as well....there had to be an easier way. Maybe they knew that sometime in the next 100 years or so, some crazy dingbat and her almost as crazy husband would be trying to find their diggings. I'll betcha they're sitting back somewhere in the miner's afterlife and laughing at us. :rolleyes:


Road? What road? This is the way to Journigan Mine :eek:
680

brian10x
01-14-2007, 03:17 PM
DISCOVERY: I bought some shake lights at Bass Pro Shop, on a lark. I figured maybe for an emergency type situation, they'd be OK. Lets just say....they DO cast light, just not lots of it. I shook one up for a while and walked into the dark silence of the garage to test it. After a minute or so, I heard a faint tapping at the flashlight lens and looked down. Sure enough, there was an aged moth, wearing dark sunglasses with a seeing-eye mosquito on the end of a leash, tapping the lens with a cane. I asked him why he wasn't with his friends dining on clothes at the GOODWILL, or something. He replied: "I'm old and don't see too well, but I like to venture out and find stuff to explore this time of year, even if it isn't particularly bright OR interesting. It makes me feel a little bit younger and it keeps the fire burning, so to speak". I turned off the light and went inside, and as I was closing the door, I heard a faint curse as he bumped into his reflection on the truck.

*Cue the "Wonder Years" music and narration; "That night, I learned that it was important to pursue the hobby that you love, no matter what the weather is like or how crappy you feel. I learned to stop procrastinating and finding excuses, and that getting out and doing something will put everything else in your life into perspective.

I also learned that I'm about as bright as a Bass Pro Shop shake light...;)

Goat.

Thank you my friend, for the inspiration. Next weekend, rain or shine, I'll be.....somewhere deserted.

brian10x
01-14-2007, 03:18 PM
What is this, revaluations hour?

Other than having the season crud and my bronchitis fighting me, I've been busy busting butt on getting the house fixed up. But it's all in good reason, as the faster the house gets done, the sooner I can sell it and move to a better place away from this cess pool :D

You are welcome here in Southern Arizona!

brian10x
01-14-2007, 03:26 PM
True confessions huh. Well, the crud's got me too, can't put a name to it, just a general achy feeling that doesn't seem to develop into anything further. BUT, being stubborn, hardheaded and tenacious, I'm not giving in to whatever's trying to nail me. The colder temps are perfect for explorations.
We're still out on an almost daily basis and still trying to reach the $##!! Journigan Mine. The forest service map is dead wrong, the road they've got marked isn't in the right location. We've finally got it exactly pinned down as far as the location goes, but hiking to it takes some real stamina, something I'm lacking right now. If this dadgum mine was a lead mine, how the heck did they haul anything into or out of it? There aren't any roads going directly to it and from the looks of the terrain, there never was a road. The existing road stops about a mile from the mine and from there, it's an uphill hike, climbing over boulders, dense growth and a thriving wall-to-wall briar and cactus garden. It's the most forbidding mile you can imagine.
I'm convinced that these miners were not only hardy souls, but they had to be obsessed with the idea of making money and a wee bit nutty as well....there had to be an easier way. Maybe they knew that sometime in the next 100 years or so, some crazy dingbat and her almost as crazy husband would be trying to find their diggings. I'll betcha they're sitting back somewhere in the miner's afterlife and laughing at us. :rolleyes:


Road? What road? This is the way to Journigan Mine :eek:

680


Laura,
You and Ralph are a true inspiration to gters everywhere. You've got a lot of internal fortitude going for you.
maybe this will be the lucky trip where you step through the rotting floorboards of a miner's cabin to reveal a cache of ah, er, lead.
Well, at last we could cast fishing sinkers, wheel weights, and bullets!

Goat
01-14-2007, 04:50 PM
Gary, my wife teaches at Lewis E. Rowe Elementary, over by UNLV. Where's your wife teach? I know quite a few people at Helen J. Stewart, and other places too. Seems like I've become the company's good will ambassador, and I've met a lot of teachers through various functions.

Brian, I think I inspired myself with my own mothy fable. I think we'll go out tomorrow and pop off a few rounds at least. I've gotta empty out a few .41 cases so I can come up with some different loads. I've got an inquiry in with my dealer, and might be getting another one in the next couple of months, depending on price.

I've got a bunch of Caliente questions for you Gary, when the time is right.

Goat

LauraA
01-14-2007, 05:06 PM
I also learned that I'm about as bright as a Bass Pro Shop shake light...;)
Goat.
Not true Goat, you're a shining halogen...that's some wonderful inspirational writing. Thank you! :)


maybe this will be the lucky trip where you step through the rotting floorboards of a miner's cabin to reveal a cache of ah, er, lead.
Well, at last we could cast fishing sinkers, wheel weights, and bullets!

You're right Brian, gotta keep the faith. (although, sometimes in my case, the lead is located elsewhere besides the mine) :cool:

GaryB
01-15-2007, 12:13 AM
Gary, my wife teaches at Lewis E. Rowe Elementary, over by UNLV. Where's your wife teach?

I've got a bunch of Caliente questions for you Gary, when the time is right.

Goat


She's now at Moore Elem. over by Stewart and Lamb. Funny thing is their mascot is a miner. Started at Lunt Elem. (read ghetto) IIRC she did some student teaching at Rowe. Then again I think all UNLV students do ;) She loves the kids and the rewards, but has quickly tired of the bureaucracies that chase so many teachers away from here.

Ask away about Caliente, either here on the boards or PM me.

BTW, know anyone that can put a Remington .22-250 model 788 trigger back together? :D

GaryB
01-15-2007, 12:22 AM
You are welcome here in Southern Arizona!


Eeeew!

Actually I like the state (scenery), and most of the natives I have met. But Arizona has the same issue as Nevada with idiots from other states moving there and trying to change the place like to where they came from.

Plus every where I'd be willing to move to, I can't afford. Because I try not to go where it's hotter or as (or more) congested than this place. So that leaves all the artsy yuppie parts where the homeless only make six figures :(

brian10x
01-15-2007, 04:40 AM
Gary, my wife teaches at Lewis E. Rowe Elementary, over by UNLV. Where's your wife teach? I know quite a few people at Helen J. Stewart, and other places too. Seems like I've become the company's good will ambassador, and I've met a lot of teachers through various functions.

Brian, I think I inspired myself with my own mothy fable. I think we'll go out tomorrow and pop off a few rounds at least. I've gotta empty out a few .41 cases so I can come up with some different loads. I've got an inquiry in with my dealer, and might be getting another one in the next couple of months, depending on price.

I've got a bunch of Caliente questions for you Gary, when the time is right.

Goat

(off topic warning)
You load .41? Don't you know thats an obsolete caliber?

I load for 10mm and 9x18 Mac.

Goat
01-15-2007, 08:56 AM
Gary, here's a few questions for you; What's the main source of income in the area? What is the price of housing? Are the folks there generally friendly, or do you have to be a sixth generation resident to get any work done on your stuff (or a nod and a "Good Mornin'", even)? What is the general consensus on the possibility of the "nuke waste" train going through the area? Do they have faith in Harry and his words on this issue, or are they skeptical :D (Loaded question warning!)?
I've been in Vegas since '94 and still haven't found a competent gunsmith. I've got an M1 carbine that recently started splitting case heads and will probably take it out of state to get it fixed. Have you thought about a Timney trigger?

Good man, Brian! I've been reloading for it (and my faithful 4" M57) for about 15 years. For me, it's a once-in-a-lifetime combination of hand meets gun/caliber/loads and finds harmony. It does anything I ask of it to perfection, and when I die, my ashes will be loaded into its chambers and fired into the sunset. That's how sweet it is! Right now, I'm looking at a (much lighter)Freedom Arms M97 to give the old dog a break. Doubt that it'll be as good, though.
If life had turned out differently, and I was more of an auto loader man, you could replace the paragraph above with 10mm and Delta. I reloaded and shot those extensively, too. The only difference was that, when it came down to a "Sophie's Choice" with paying medical bills or living in a cardboard box, I chose the revolver out of familiarity and years of service over the Colt. But the Delta is still the finest autoloader/caliber ever made (for me-your results may vary).

GaryB
01-15-2007, 10:28 PM
Gary, here's a few questions for you; What's the main source of income in the area? What is the price of housing? Are the folks there generally friendly, or do you have to be a sixth generation resident to get any work done on your stuff (or a nod and a "Good Mornin'", even)? What is the general consensus on the possibility of the "nuke waste" train going through the area? Do they have faith in Harry and his words on this issue, or are they skeptical (Loaded question warning!)?

Well, it's pretty much like any small community really. And I'm mixing Panaca, Pioche and Caliente all together as they are all in the same mix, even if they try not to be. I'd live in any one likely, even Panaca which is a big LDS town, even though I'm not in anyway religious.

The people who make the most money usually have some type of government job, or own/run their own business. The BLM, NDOT have offices there. The UP uses it as a halfway point, etc, etc. A large part of the community is either retired or semi. Everyone else scrimps by on low paying jobs like wait staff, cooks, maids, etc. But the cost of living is no where like it is here, so it likely evens out. If you are fortunate to own a good business, you're probably doing okay. Some folks try doing things there that thrive in a bigger city, but the demand isn't there. Tourism is really taking off and the folks in charge have caught on and are doing a decent job to try and capitalize on it. Motels and RV parks are good money there. I've seriously thought of opening up an RV park/small sporting goods store to make a living. I still might do it too if I can get things lined out right.

The housing is funny, a lot of retirees are moving up there and paying boo koo prices so that drives the market up, plus the LV Water Authority is trying to steal as much land for water rights. But you can find some good deals, and even if you pay a good amount of money, you likely are getting a nice sized lot of land unlike Vegas. Some of the older homes are going pretty cheap, it really just depends on where and why. If the housing market drops like they figure, that area will be really cheap across the board once again. 2 years ago my cousin bought a 3000 SF house with 5 acres for just under 200K. I'd say you could get that still for well under 300K, likely less soon. Here's a good site I watch for land/homes: http://www.nevadaonsale.com/en.php/properties/lincoln/-/-/?o=1 It has the name sof all the real estate companies up there too. There's a lot more for sell than just what they list, but it gives you a good idea of the variations.

I'd say everyone tends to be pretty friendly. It's a small community, so everyone knows who's screwing who. But if you're good people, then I think they'll gladly take you in. I've yet to meet anyone half as big as a jerk off like I meet everyday here. I don't always let on to who I am or who I'm related to, and I've been treated pretty nice. Even after they find out I'm from Vegas ;) Though I usually win them over when I can out complain them about this place.

As far as the whole nuke issue, it seems pretty split. Many don't want it, many feel it'd be good for decent paying jobs. But I think even the ones willing to have it would like to find the money another way. Being the nations garbage dump doesn't sit well with most Southern Nevadans anyway, especially since we get crapped on already. And many up there are "Downwinders", so they know all too much about how fun a little radiation can be. But I think that's taken a back seat to fight Vegas over the water rights issues. If the state or feds don't step in and straighten it out, that's likely to get very ugly.

It has it's issues and good vibes like everywhere else I guess, just a lot smaller scale. There's not much future, so you have a lot of kids moving out, but then you have a lot of retirees and folks tired of the big city moving in. There is a drug use issue, and a lot of folks go to AA, but then again there's not much for people to do. Many are resistant to change, while many are trying to get new ideas going. There are some pushing for industrial complexes and the like to secure jobs. You have a blend of old and new ways, but I think everyone is really trying to keep things simple to keep the better living environment there.

Myself and my wife like the small town feel. I like having very little traffic and no where near the people. Folks can leave their doors unlocked. IIRC they haven't had a murder for 15 years or so. You have numerous outdoor activities in your back yard. Not too hot and not too cold, for long anyways. The way of life is just so much easier and relaxing. I'd have gone back years ago if there was any way to make a real living other than having a g'ment job. Heck, my dad has been trying to get back since he moved here in '60 :D I have family that run a perlite mine that I could probably get into, but I don't like working for family. Makes it harder to tell them where to stick it ;)


Here's the official tourist site for Lincoln, has some good links: http://www.lincolncountynevada.com/

Here's a link of the demographics and studies for the area too: http://lcrda.com/

I'm sure someone from there will get on and ream me over something, but that's fine. I'll just move next to them and play my music loud and rev my engines late at night :D


Have you thought about a Timney trigger?



From what I have read, not much if any aftermarket is available for them. It's been fun trying to locate extra clips even. The 788 is not popular among many, in fact many bad mouth it. My Aunt gave it to me when I mentioned I'd be interested in it mainly for the caliber. I wanted a low end deer rifle that would be good and use cheap ammo for plugging coyotes and bobcats. I was thinking of getting a .223 WSSM, but my friend mentioned I'd likely destroy any usable pelts.

Flatiron
01-16-2007, 03:46 AM
GaryB.......Have you considered the .204 Ruger as a varmint caliber? I just bought a Remington 700SPS and mounted a Nikon 3x9 on it, but the jury is still out on it as I haven't had a chance to take it to the range and bench rest test it. I "milk carton" tested it out in the desert, but didn't do real well with it. The ammo isn't cheap, however, so if you do a lot of shooting, it's probably not the best choice. This is the first rifle I've bought in years, but after reading the ballistics tests on it, I just had to have one,ya know. :p

GaryB
01-16-2007, 09:41 AM
Well I was sticking around the .22-250 -.223 caliber as my friend can load these already with lots of experience in the rounds. And the price on this gun was right :D I bought 50 rounds at the last gun show for $12 just so I could have some brass to load later on. The problem was the trigger was jammed from what I'm guessing was bad maintenance and had to be tore apart to clean and service it. Only problem is the guy who started it for me didn't get to finish it, so I have a bag of trigger parts :o I've been looking for a manual or pictures, but to no avail. Looks like I'll have to take it to Hurricane, UT to get it done right maybe :rolleyes:

Except for maybe buying a new mid range deer rifle to retire my dad's .243 from getting beat up, I might hold out for a Contender. My friend has a couple and I really like the ability to swap barrels. Plus I'm waiting to see what my aunt decides to do with the rest of my uncle's guns. There's a few I'd like to have (even if I have to buy them) to give me a pretty good range of calibers for what I do. He has a .22 HP that with a little work and a new stock would be a kick in the pants to shoot.

Goat
01-16-2007, 03:59 PM
Gary, maybe you can get an idea from these 2, hope it helps.
Here's a schematic: http://www.e-gunparts.com/productschem.asp?chrMasterModel=0860z788

and a picture of an assembled one: http://cgi.ebay.com/Remington-model-788-trigger-housing-assembly_W0QQitemZ250072661605QQihZ015QQcategoryZ7 3952QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

GaryB
01-16-2007, 07:44 PM
Gary, maybe you can get an idea from these 2, hope it helps.
Here's a schematic: http://www.e-gunparts.com/productschem.asp?chrMasterModel=0860z788

and a picture of an assembled one: http://cgi.ebay.com/Remington-model-788-trigger-housing-assembly_W0QQitemZ250072661605QQihZ015QQcategoryZ7 3952QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Thanks, that might help me out. I'll have to watch the one on eBay for a spare maybe.

LauraA
01-19-2007, 05:59 AM
Bumpy road this morning...

Johnnie
01-19-2007, 08:40 AM
Was Panamint Annie, a 20th Century "Calimity Jane" it sure sound like it, after we read an artical we came accross this last week end.

In 1935 Mary Elizabeth Madison quit her job at 24 as truck driver and gave up that run from New York to Chicago and headed to a dryer climate out west.

This was the begining of the end she thought, because the sawbones back east told her that she was suffering from
T B and did not have to much time left if she remained in that east coast weather.

Where did she land up Death Valley, of all places But this area of the west is just what she needed.

She felt she had been reborn she relates to a reporter who when out to interviewed her back in the late 1960s. As she sat there in her camp in Betty Nevada, among all her junk that she had collected over the years.

Piled high was washing machines, a dozen old cars, broken down trailers , you name it, Annie, probably had it somewhere " When you live out here in the middle of nowhere, you can't afford to throw anything away." she said in between drags on her cigar,

The reporter tried several times to get a word in. Finallly after many intruptions from Annie about her collection of junk he asked her about her beginings.

Annie replied by saying she was a daughter of a New York doctor, and added that she was just few units short of graduating from college.

And she was married and has four children and 13 grandchildren. Claims she hasn't seen her husband in dozen years. "He is Merchant Marine and gave up trying to find him." After so many years I gave up and i like it that way, she added.

She bragged that she had staked Claimes all over the Panamints, and could not wait till some sucker come along and want's to make a deal for all her junk, and also wants to buy all her mining claims.

Maybe someone out here on the Bulletin Board, can fill in the "gapp" between the late 1960s and now. On what happen to "This Calamity Jane of the Panamints" and what happen to all mining claims and
old junk that she collected since 1936 at the age of 25.

Back in the early 1960s when we were leaving downtown Ballarat one day on our way up to the road to Supprise Canyon we met an old women that was coming the opposite way she waved, and as we waved back we noticed that she may have been headed over towards Seldom Seen Slims, place. Could this have been
the Desert Character
Panamint Annie.:cool:

Your fellow Ghosttowner
Johnnie & Sheila

LauraA
01-19-2007, 10:25 AM
Great Post Johnnie & Sheila! Such interesting characters in the Old West (also some interesting characters in the "New" West as well) ;)

toefurr
12-02-2009, 02:28 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't the pic posted in your miners are strong stuff thread a mine tunnel off of Middlemarch Rd. in the Dragoons?

Albin
12-03-2009, 04:59 AM
Panamint Annie died in 1979 and is buried in the Rhyolite cemetary. Too bad my son and I missed it during our 2006 and 2008 summer desert trips.

More: http://www.explorehistoricalif.com/annie.html

http://www.rhyolitesite.com/annie.html

http://www.explorehistoricalif.com/images/panna_anne_grave1.jpg

Johnnie
12-12-2009, 07:04 AM
Thanks Albin, for the picture, that you posted. As the old saying goes pictures are worth 1000 words and gives more meaning to that stoey i wrote above, back in 2007. Thanks again

Johnnie and Sheila

RedDogSaloon
12-14-2009, 03:01 AM
Wow thats cool - a glass insulator by her tombstone! :)


Panamint Annie died in 1979 and is buried in the Rhyolite cemetary.
More: http://www.explorehistoricalif.com/annie.html

http://www.rhyolitesite.com/annie.html

http://www.explorehistoricalif.com/images/panna_anne_grave1.jpg