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Ghostdancer
07-20-2006, 06:15 AM
So what is your favorite book or books on the subject of ghost towns?

I think mine are Arizonas Best Ghost Towns and New Mexicos Best Ghost Towns by Phil Varney. He also has one for Southern California and maybe some others? When I was living in Tucson Phil Varney lived close to me.

Ghost Towns of Arizona and Ghost Towns of New Mexico by James and Barbara Sherman are also very good. There are some other books like these for Colorado, Texas and Oklahoma written by other authors.

Not only good reading, but have been very useful to me and my two friends on our ghost town trips. :)


Tom

LauraA
07-20-2006, 07:30 AM
On the recommendation of TW (thanks again TW) "Arizona Place Names" by Will C. Barnes and "Ghosts Of The Adobe Walls" by Nell Murbarger are both chock full of valuable, hard to find information.
For local searching, I've found that some of the smaller local area presses have been a great help, while they aren't specifically about Ghost Towns, they contain the kind of information needed to trace histories and locate some of the more out of the way locations.
"Pioneer Women of Gila County" is a local fund raiser for the Kiwanas printed a few years ago by The Daughters of the Gila County Pioneers. It tells of the early settlers to this area and is a great resource in helping to locate GT ranches and mines. "They Shot Billy Today" by Leland J. Hanchett, Jr. is an account of the Pleasant Valley War which began in 1887 as a feud between rival families in the Young, Arizona area. With some detective work, locations can be found of areas where action took place, the remains of ranch houses, cabins, etc., are still visible in the area. Another favorite of mine is "Raising Arizona's Dams" by A.E. Rogge, D. Lorne McWatters, Melissa Keane and Richard P. Emanuel. It tells of building Arizona's dams with emphasis on where the workers lived, how they lived and importantly, the locations of where they lived during the construction of these massive undertakings. Lots of GT camps are left in far-reaching areas. There were literally thousands of people employed on a single project, so it stands to reason, there are remains of the places they lived in.
Tom, I hope people will keep this thread going, it can be added to when new books are discovered. Thanks for starting the ball rolling!