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LauraA
01-01-2007, 04:49 PM
We spent a couple of days exploring the area of the former town of Livingston, AZ once located at what is now the SE end of Roosevelt Lake.
Livingston although in existence earlier, got a post office in 1896 but it closed in 1907 when it became apparent that the town would cease to exist once Roosevelt Dam was completed and the flooding to form Roosevelt Lake took place. There are no structural remains, except for vague outlines of buildings and some piles of timbers. The only remnants we found were done by metal detecting the area. When the level of Roosevelt Lake rises, the area the town once occupied disappears under the water. Livingston consisted of a small general store/post office, several ranches and some homes. The area is closed to all motorized vehicle traffic because there's some endangered bird supposedly ground nesting in the area.....wonder where the bird goes when the lake level rises? :rolleyes:


These remains were all we were able to find metal detecting
669
Not much left of the town of Livingston, Arizona
670


671
This is where Livingston once stood. When Roosevelt Lake's waters rise, this area is under water.
673

Kelly
01-01-2007, 05:51 PM
Another great story and pics,:)
Thanks Laura.

brian10x
01-02-2007, 06:59 PM
[quote=LauraA;24431]We spent a couple of days exploring the area of the former town of Livingston, AZ once located at what is now the SE end of Roosevelt Lake.

Good job, Laura. It looks like from your pictures there may be lots of goodies still left to be found.
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Of of my Tucson buddies has been informed of possible undisturbed remains in the Aravaipa area.

I've been there a few years ago, and I'd say its a distinct possibility.

It might be an interesting area to research. If you happen to look for it, its near Klondyke.

High Desert Drifter
01-02-2007, 08:14 PM
wow there is some pretty scarry stuff in there. lucky you didn't run any of that over in your jeep or Hubby would not be happy changing the tire. Nice find.

LauraA
01-03-2007, 02:58 AM
Of of my Tucson buddies has been informed of possible undisturbed remains in the Aravaipa area.
I've been there a few years ago, and I'd say its a distinct possibility.
It might be an interesting area to research. If you happen to look for it, its near Klondyke.
Thanks Brian, I'll do some research into the possibilities.

wow there is some pretty scarry stuff in there. lucky you didn't run any of that over in your jeep or Hubby would not be happy changing the tire. Nice find.
The area is closed to all motorized vehicles, we had to hike...probably a good thing.

Johnnie
01-04-2007, 04:40 AM
We spent a couple of days exploring the area of the former town of Livingston, AZ once located at what is now the SE end of Roosevelt Lake.
Livingston although in existence earlier, got a post office in 1896 but it closed in 1907 when it became apparent that the town would cease to exist once Roosevelt Dam was completed and the flooding to form Roosevelt Lake took place. There are no structural remains, except for vague outlines of buildings and some piles of timbers. The only remnants we found were done by metal detecting the area. When the level of Roosevelt Lake rises, the area the town once occupied disappears under the water. Livingston consisted of a small general store/post office, several ranches and some homes. The area is closed to all motorized vehicle traffic because there's some endangered bird supposedly ground nesting in the area.....wonder where the bird goes when the lake level rises? :rolleyes:


These remains were all we were able to find metal detecting
669
Not much left of the town of Livingston, Arizona
670


671
This is where Livingston once stood. When Roosevelt Lake's waters rise, this area is under water.

673


Greaat pictures Laura,

Just checkng in. After being absent for couple days. But do have a note!.... from our siblings.

Johnnie & Sheila :D

LauraA
01-04-2007, 05:29 AM
Welcome back Johnnie & Sheila, hope you both have a Happy, Healthy 2007! :)

Johnnie
01-04-2007, 08:06 AM
Greaat pictures Laura,

Just checkng in. After being absent for couple days. But do have a note!.... from our siblings.

Johnnie & Sheila :D

'Happy New Year" to you Laura, and Everyone else on Ghosttowns.com:)

Sheila & Johnnie

Darkwatch
01-08-2007, 07:13 AM
Great place, this. Beautiful photos also ;)

PS. I'm new in this forum. Excuse me for my english, i'm Italian :)

So long.

4cruizn
01-09-2007, 11:57 AM
Thanks for the report, Laura. I'm a Ghosttowns.com newbie and a recent move-in to Arizona but I'll have to keep an eye on the website and plan out some potential ghost-towning trips around here.

LauraA
01-09-2007, 05:13 PM
4cruizn, Welcome to Arizona and the forum! There's a load of neat places to explore here. A good place to start is by doing a search right here on the forum and of course, Ghost Towns and History of the American West (http://ghosttowns.com/) has some good listings and information as well. Keep us posted on your explorations. :)

Watt Noise
01-18-2007, 05:41 PM
Laura and Brian...

I've been trapsing up and down the valley from the canyon and Klondyke to Bonita over the past year and a half looking at old military sites for the museum... If you're looking for something in particular, I might have some info on it or could find out from some of the ranchers I've met up there... PM me if you like...

Kevin

LauraA
01-18-2007, 06:11 PM
Watt, Thanks for the offer of help, it's much appreciated. We'd be interested in hearing about what you've been seeing in your travels. :)

brian10x
01-19-2007, 03:11 AM
Laura and Brian...

I've been trapsing up and down the valley from the canyon and Klondyke to Bonita over the past year and a half looking at old military sites for the museum... If you're looking for something in particular, I might have some info on it or could find out from some of the ranchers I've met up there... PM me if you like...

Kevin
PM sent!
("message too short." Ok. how about now?)

Watt Noise
01-19-2007, 10:30 PM
The link below is from a trip last November ('06)... Before you go - understand that the other forum is about aerial photography so it's geared towards that interest... The post is also mainly concerned with living history rather than abandoned areas... But, remnants of all sorts are all around...

One thing to know is that most everything is private property that is lived and worked on around there... Lots of stuff can be seen along the Klondyke Rd. and if you have a map showing it, there is alot of state land as well to explore... The canyon is mainly owned by the nature conservancy up to the wilderness and there is no access allowed off the main road once you enter the canyon... Most of the roads off of Klondyke are also gated and locked... You can't get to Aravaipa (the GT) without permission to cross private land... The road to Old Fort Thomas is also gated a few miles up from Klondyke Rd...

Much of the access I've been able to get is because of my affiliation with the museum and some well placed referrals... We've been tracking camp sites of the US Cavalry travelling between the different forts of the 1870's... One that the other post references has been found - you'll see my exasperation over being 20 miles off in November... From our reference point we went 10 miles S rather than 10 miles N... LOL - :rolleyes:

Lastly, bad flood in August wiped out alot of the road... We were able to travel every where with some 4WD in November... All is probably OK by now...

Klondyke area is great... Eureka Springs Ranch is being sold off in 36 acre parcels... The High Creek loop has lots of stuff along the road... You won't believe the size of the Euro farms hydroponics operations on the road going there (Ft Grant Rd out of Wilcox)...

The link: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=605384

Kevin

LauraA
01-20-2007, 02:45 AM
Kevin, Thanks so much for sharing that link. It's neat being able to view those places from such a unique perspective. There's quite a bit of ranching history up in my neck of the woods as well, mostly word of mouth, not a lot written, so it makes it a challenge to locate some of the more remote locations. :)