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View Full Version : Who owns most ghost towns?



andrgo
01-28-2007, 05:18 PM
Are most ghost towns privately owned or owned by the government?

I always thought it'd be cool to live in a ghost town, even if I was the only person living there.

How would you go about buying say one lot in a ghost town, especially if the gov't owned it - would they sell it?

old judge
01-28-2007, 07:32 PM
Not unless Johnnie let them. OJ

GaryB
01-28-2007, 10:55 PM
Depending on what you consider a ghost town, you can buy land in Goldfield, Tonopah, Eureka, Austin, Manhattan, heck pretty much every little town in Nevada. In fact, someone is selling Nevada land on eBay that has a bunch of old mines on it supposedly full of gold. IIRC it's in Lander County or something like that.

The BLM tends to sell land as they see fit, regardless of what's on it. Unless it has a pre-established historical site on it to my knowledge, then they aren't supposed to.

Most GT's land are likely owned by the counties as well for back taxes.

Johnnie
01-29-2007, 06:23 AM
Not unless Johnnie let them. OJ

We agree with Gary,post also. And this is to O J. I retired from the political (Tug-a-war) And our fellow gosttowner Another Bob, knows a lot about about B L M issues. and can most likely answer some questions related to to (B L M) Land. Bob, is due too check in .....anytime.

Johnnie & Sheila

Bob
01-29-2007, 07:50 AM
We agree with Gary,post also. And this is to O J. I retired from the political (Tug-a-war) when I pass the rains, over to our fellow gosttowner, Another Bob, and he is the spokesman for B L M. Bob is an insider now, and can answer everything related to to (B L M) Land. Bob, is due too check in .....anytime.

Johnnie & Sheila


If the land was ever patented then it has either gone to the county for taxes or has an private owner. I am NOT a spokesman for the BLM, I am an citizen advisor to an BLM Resouce Advisory Council and I've been commenting, lobbying, providing input as a citizen to the BLM for over 40 years so I can assure you than if the BLM, Forest Service, National Parks Service, and even DOD facilities in my area will show the proper concern about protecting those little bits of unpatented history they manage! Messing with history requires a management plan and public comment. The government requires any significant action be reviewed by the public with several acts of Congress including various Archeological Protection acts and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). NEPA review is required on anything from building fence to developing a fire management plan which would and does take in account ghost towns on public and private land. They can fill a mineshaft after NEPA review, they can allow a modern company to raze a section of ghost town after NEPA review BUT if enough citizens comment, the mitigation required in the final approval will be much better than if the public keeps quiet. I can only speak for Nevada issues, I've heard horror stories about the State of Utah, various Alaska, Utah, Kalifornya but I haven't reviewed any of those decisions! A stop at the local county recorders office is always a good first step in researching a ghost town anyway!

Johnnie
01-30-2007, 07:38 AM
If the land was ever patented then it has either gone to the county for taxes or has an private owner. I am NOT a spokesman for the BLM, I am an citizen advisor to an BLM Resouce Advisory Council and I've been commenting, lobbying, providing input as a citizen to the BLM for over 40 years so I can assure you than if the BLM, Forest Service, National Parks Service, and even DOD facilities in my area will show the proper concern about protecting those little bits of unpatented history they manage! Messing with history requires a management plan and public comment. The government requires any significant action be reviewed by the public with several acts of Congress including various Archeological Protection acts and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). NEPA review is required on anything from building fence to developing a fire management plan which would and does take in account ghost towns on public and private land. They can fill a mineshaft after NEPA review, they can allow a modern company to raze a section of ghost town after NEPA review BUT if enough citizens comment, the mitigation required in the final approval will be much better than if the public keeps quiet. I can only speak for Nevada issues, I've heard horror stories about the State of Utah, various Alaska, Utah, Kalifornya but I haven't reviewed any of those decisions! A stop at the local county recorders office is always a good first step in researching a ghost town anyway!

Thanks for your input Bob, We ment to say that you have a lot of the "lastest" information on
B L M Issues. not spokemsn. and a truck load of history on Nevada ghost towns in your archives.

Our apology
Johnnie & Sheila:)

old judge
01-30-2007, 02:03 PM
The County Recorders of whom Bob speaks can provide a wealth of info. Some have great and informative, easily navigated websites. Some wouldn't know a website from sic 'em. Some of that's economic and some is lack of need and interest. Some of that really good information is on the sites of County Treasurers, Assessors, Clerks, Registrars of Deeds, and goodness knows what else. It could be worth a try, but prove a bit frustrating.

dvsww2
01-30-2007, 08:11 PM
I've found them to be quit helpful, especially if there is property that owner can't pay the taxes on and they don't want it back because of envronmental concerns. Sometimes there can be unforeseen problems with leases which can really be a quagmire.