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LauraA
03-02-2007, 06:59 PM
Well, it's the end of the Blue Bird Mine as we knew it. The Forest Service is doing a classic reclamation of the site. The old cabin is gone and soon, the adits to the mine shafts will be closed forever.
We were able to go today to watch the proceedings and bid the Blue Bird a sad good-bye.
The first hint that things were really proceeding was the road, it was like a super highway by comparison to what the road was like on previous visits. No more off-camber, tippy, stomach churning, seat grabbing, turns...the "pucker factor" has been eliminated. Bulldozers have been through and cleared the road to enable a 10 ton dump truck to have access. They've hauled in huge culvert-type metal pipes that are fitted with bars, these will be used to plug the mine adits, still allowing bats to enter and exit.
We thought it would be a sentimental touch to leave a bit of ourselves in the mine for future generations of would-be explorers so we put together a time capsule. In it we put a book of my poetry, a letter to whomever finds it, some current currency and coins, a newspaper and a few other assorted goodies....wonder if it'll ever be found...?
It's understandable to some extent to see why the government implements these changes, but on the other hand the mine tunnels themselves are rich in history and many of them have been around long enough to take on an almost natural appearance with stalagmites and stalactites beginning to form. The Blue Bird for example took on sparkling jewel-like reflections when the beams from our lights glanced over the faceted Azurite and Fluorite walls and ceilings.
We now have an old wooden chair from the Blue Bird sitting in our den, it was to have been hauled off too, we're lucky enough to have a piece of history.
The Forest Service will leave in place the ore conveyor as well as the ore chute for future explorers to marvel at. The mine's tunnels will be sitting, barred to entry so people will be left to speculate what it must be like deep within the dark and silent recesses.


This is where the old cabin stood
756
Drilling to put bars in place
757
Ralph checking it out
758
An old bat in the mine
759

LauraA
03-02-2007, 07:04 PM
A hole in the ceiling leading to parts unknown
760
The pipes they'll use to close the adits
761

High Desert Drifter
03-02-2007, 07:37 PM
Excellent Post! I like the idea of the time capsule. maybe it would be worth a visit to the nearest historical society to provide them with a report of what took place as well as photo's. You might be able to assist someone in the future with needed research information on the site. What I have done in the past is wrote a statement of facts, had it noterized, attached photo's, and delivered them to the local historical society / museum. By the way, I liked your pictures too! especially the one of the old bat in the cave!

LauraA
03-02-2007, 08:01 PM
Great idea Drifter! Globe has a nice mining museum, as a matter of fact, we got a lot of our information about the Blue Bird from their extensive library archives. We've got plenty of pictures to offer. I'll give them a call and see if they're interested. Thanks! (from the old cave bat) ;)

GaryB
03-02-2007, 09:20 PM
Funny, they do more damage to the environment to go in and remove it than if they'd just let it waste away :rolleyes:

speedy
03-03-2007, 06:37 AM
Great post, Laura. Just a little sad.....Speedy

LauraA
03-03-2007, 04:52 PM
Great post, Laura. Just a little sad.....Speedy

Speedy, I'm glad you said that.
I must admit I shed a tear or two for the old Blue Bird. I know it's silly, but being female, I don't have to explain my emotions.(I couldn't if I tried anway)
It's terribly sad seeing places like that lost forever to future generations, as it is there's so little information to be found about the actual "real" people who were a part of our past. There's lots available about mine owners, outlaws, soiled doves, politicians even shop keepers, but so little written about the ordinary folks who were just trying to make an everyday living.
The Blue Bird was just an ordinary mine, nothing special, but each time we visited it, we could almost get a feeling for the people who once lived there and worked so hard in the mine.
We're sad about the Blue Bird, somehow my husband and I both felt an affinity with the place, now it's gone. I'm thankful we had the chance to know her before she was lost. :(

cheever
03-03-2007, 07:58 PM
Funny, they do more damage to the environment to go in and remove it than if they'd just let it waste away :rolleyes:

So true GaryB, you have no idea how many times I have witnessed this here in Utah. Not to mention how much money is wasted on making these sites "safe" to the public.

LauraA
03-04-2007, 08:04 AM
So true GaryB, you have no idea how many times I have witnessed this here in Utah. Not to mention how much money is wasted on making these sites "safe" to the public.

I wonder what would be wrong with simply posting signs telling people it's dangerous, enter at your own risk or even do not enter? Looks like it would be more cost effective to replace signs as they needed it sooner than go in and spend big $$ bulldozing a site and gating adits. (the contractor doing the Blue Bird "reclamation" is being paid "time and materials" imagine what THAT bill is going to be)
I suppose there's not a simple solution. If left alone, these sites would eventually be reclaimed by Mother Nature, there's no money to preserve them, particularly the so-called "unimportant" sites that didn't make a big impact on history and aren't frequently accessed by the general public.
I would be remiss if I didn't say that I've got enormous respect for the Tonto National Forest Rangers, they do a heck of a job out here and love the land as much as the rest of us. They're simply following orders from Washington suits who wouldn't know an adit from their butts.*


*Footnote:
Hey you guys in Washington D.C., the adit is the one with the gate that has bats flying in and out and served a useful purpose, your butt on the other hand is the thing you're sitting on and talking through. :mad:

GaryB
03-04-2007, 09:00 AM
*Footnote:
Hey you guys in Washington D.C., the adit is the one with the gate that has bats flying in and out and served a useful purpose, your butt on the other hand is the thing you're sitting on and talking through. :mad:

You forgot they use their butt for cranial storage too.

LauraA
03-04-2007, 01:03 PM
You forgot they use their butt for cranial storage too.

You mean like this guy? :D


762

GaryB
03-04-2007, 06:45 PM



stupid form filler

45-70Ranger
03-04-2007, 10:46 PM
You mean like this guy? :D



762


I guess this is what happens when you get a law degree.
It's called "**** necrophilia".
Too bad someone don't bulldoze down their houses,saying it's unsafe to live in idiot Washington DC.
Laura, it goes to show that these "safety idiots" are really stupid.

LauraA
03-11-2007, 03:11 PM
We must be gluttons for punishment, today we decided to take a ride to the Blue Bird to see what's left. The ore bin and tracks are still there, but the adits have been closed, piped and barred. They've used some sort of hardening foam glop to seal around a pipe they shoved into the entrance. The larger adit is barred with a grate. How can anyone think that yellow foam glop is better than leaving the dang thing alone? :mad: :(


"Reclamation"
771
Yellow foam glop
772
Grated
773

GaryB
03-11-2007, 10:07 PM
Good 'ol industrial expansion foam.

Wonder if they used water based or chemical based? Most chemical based ones put off gases and are not exactly enviro-friendly in that type of situation. At least most of the ones I have dealt with anyway. They also tend to break down over time, leaving debris not originally part of the environment. And animals like to chew on it.


So since it was the government, and they were looking out for the land and the people of the good 'ol US of A, I'm guessing chemical based. Oh well, who needs all those chipmunks anyway?

LauraA
03-12-2007, 05:21 AM
I think you're right Gary, it felt like it has a chemical base, although we didn't detect any odor. Part of it hadn't dried yet and when I got it on my hands it dried on contact ... sorta like Super Glue does. I guess they weren't thinking about chipmunks, ground squirrels or pack rats, after all, they were just trying to make the adits "bat friendly." :rolleyes: (this old bat doesn't feel very friendly about the situation)
It's sure good to know the government is looking out for us by shutting down an isolated, once inaccessible, scarcely visited mine. Now anybody in a low-rider can drive there and spray graffiti on the pretty yellow foam. Wonder what's next? I think we need to petition them to fence off all cacti and extract rattlesnake fangs, somebody could get hurt. :( :mad: :confused:

Goat
03-12-2007, 05:02 PM
Such a shame when this stuff happens, Laura. I don't understand why the government looks at a "hole in the ground", while we see a snapshot of the past. It seems shortsighted to do this, because it seems that we are always "refinding" methods and equipment that people used successfully only a few generations ago.

I guess the "suits" that do this have never sat down at a ghost town with a few maps and old photo's and contemplated the complexity involved in these mining operations.

Sad indeed.

Goat

BTW, love your new AOL page! 'specially the goat pictures!

bad bob
03-12-2007, 06:01 PM
Don't know all the reasons, and don't agree with the methods of closure, but I'm sure you all know it's mainly a liability issue.

Today's young people especially, have no boundaries for reckless, dangerous fun, bikers offroading, etc. Such isolated places have to be potential lawsuit havens. And I'm not sure, but posting signs even, may not exempt the landowners from damages for injury or death.

bb.

LauraA
03-12-2007, 06:57 PM
Thanks Goat, glad you enjoyed the journal, the goats are adorable! ;)

Bad Bob, I'm sure the reason the government gives for "reclamation" of these mining sites is because of the liability issue...as if anyone would have deep enough pockets to sue the Feds and prevail. :rolleyes: That excuse doesn't fly with me. How far can they take it? The desert by its very nature can be a dangerous place, maybe it should be enclosed with electric fencing?
They're gleefully destroying history and in my opinion, it's not theirs to destroy.

This from a New York Times article written about the Grand Canyon:
"And 58 visitors have already gotten lost along the trails in the pink canyon that splits the desert for nearly 300 miles in northwestern Arizona.
They were all eventually found, but every year one or two visitors disappear without a trace and another few are killed in falls. ''Given the number who leave their brains at home, that's not too bad,'' said Charles Farabee, the management assistant to the superintendent, Richard Marks."
Yikes, do ya think they'll bulldoze it? :eek:


TOURISIM BOOM AT GRAND CANYON: THE TOUGH PART IS FINDING AN ELEVATOR - New York Times (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?sec=travel&res=9A0DE1DB103AF937A15756C0A960948260)

bad bob
03-12-2007, 09:06 PM
Bad Bob, I'm sure the reason the government gives for "reclamation" of these mining sites is because of the liability issue...as if anyone would have deep enough pockets to sue the Feds and prevail. :rolleyes: That excuse doesn't fly with me. How far can they take it? The desert by its very nature can be a dangerous place, maybe it should be enclosed with electic fencing?
They're gleefully destroying history and in my opinion, it's not theirs to destroy.




I can only surmise the difference is that one makes conscious decisions to enter a desert invironment, or National Park. If a visitor to Yellowstone NP is attacked and killed by a grizzley, which has happened more than once, can the victim's family sue and prevail? (Perhaps the resident jurist here can shed a little light)?

On the other hand, if some hikers stumble into the Blue Bird Mine, and an accident with major injuries of some sort, (or death) takes place, who's liable? Fed or no fed, many lawyers will be more than happy to represent the claimants. What other reason could there be for boarding up such a place?

LauraA
03-13-2007, 03:43 AM
On the other hand, if some hikers stumble into the Blue Bird Mine, and an accident with major injuries of some sort, (or death) takes place, who's liable? Fed or no fed, many lawyers will be more than happy to represent the claimants. What other reason could there be for boarding up such a place?
If hikers stumble into the Blue Bird, or any other location like it, they too make the conscious decision to explore it or not. I believe appropriate warning signs should be sufficient for people pondering the decision.
My understanding is that the feds have set aside "super fund" money to be used for reclamations. It's up to each forest service district to choose the sites they want to spend the money on.
Where's OJ? We could use some legal advice. :D

GaryB
03-13-2007, 06:45 AM
I think we should be able to sue lawyers who represent stupid people on the basis of messing with the natural selection process.

bad bob
03-13-2007, 09:00 AM
If hikers stumble into the Blue Bird, or any other location like it, they too make the conscious decision to explore it or not. I believe appropriate warning signs should be sufficient for people pondering the decision.
My understanding is that the feds have set aside "super fund" money to be used for reclamations. It's up to each forest service district to choose the sites they want to spend the money on.
Where's OJ? We could use some legal advice. :D


It's true, the same conscious decision IS made, but I think the difference may be connected to "man made" vs "nature-al". Bureauocrats can't think outside the box. And since putting a fence around the desert is impossible, they're gonna regulate places that are do-able in their world. I had to learn that the hard way eons ago. :(

What makes it even more unbelievable is that it would take an enormous grass-roots protest just to get their attention. And in the end, their still gonna do what they want anyway.

The only solution I can think of right now is to try and petition to have an area declared a state historical site.

cheever
03-13-2007, 09:17 PM
What other reason could there be for boarding up such a place?

Simply put money is the number one reason for doing all of this whether they like to admit it or not. Just like LauraA mentioned the fact that they get Federal funding to "clean" these areas up. And let us not forget the loving EPA who also gets seperate Federal funding to clean up the more toxic sites.

It's too bad that the Bureau of Mines made an Ohio Congressman angry and in turn were disbanded because of it. From what I understand they were not exactly interested in the Historical value of these mines, but in many cases they still fought with the EPA and the Bureau of Reclamation on the closing of these mines. Basically I guess you could call them a sort of check and balance for these two larger organizations.

Also along this same train of thought and hopefully I won't get flamed because of it, but what does everyone think of disclosing the locations to these areas and areas that you may have discovered on your own, but is not marked on the map?

On one side you have the people that have these wonderful websites that document the areas they have traveled and have great pictures of the area, but they change the name of the place or just plain out won't tell you the name of it or how to get to it to keep it "safe" from the general public (granted I know that there are a lot of ignorant people out there), because that is the only real way in their opinion to preserve it.

On the other side and many of the people on this site fall into this catagory thankfully, are the people that are willing to share and help others find those hard to find places and have no problems sharing info on how to get to these different areas. Also many of you also have wonderful websites too. :)

My personal opinion is this, you can bet that the BLM and the Forestey service know where these areas are and they are no secret to them. So at least is the case in Utah anyway, that they will eventually get to even some of the most inaccessible places to close down the mines regardless of whether the general public has kept it a secret or not. I don't believe that keeping them secret is the way to save these areas from destruction err I mean reclamation. I believe that public awareness is the way to help presrve these areas based on the fact that there are strength in numbers, so the more that know about it, the there are to help fight the battle.

OK OK my rant is now over.

High Desert Drifter
03-14-2007, 04:36 PM
There are a couple of locations that I am exploring that I am affraid to disclose more than a name and photo's because of vandalism, but even more because I fear that the BLM or Dept of Forestry will eliminate access if others start visiting. I realize that there are safety issues and that they may be liable if they are aware of an area that has potential hazzards and do not address them. Most times these are the most beautiful places to explore because they appear untouched. many times there is so much stuff that was left behind that all it takes is to look down at your feet to view or touch a piece of history. But if this information was shared with those who do not have the same beliefs and views, and a place becomes popular among visitors, explorers and vandals alike, it would most definately be taken away.

-catch 22-
if we don't share our passion and pass along our exploration enthusiam (did i spell that right) less people will fight for the right to keep these lands public in the future. Its a fine line, and one that should be considered..... My rule is; Careful who you divulge information to!

I personally do not include directions to most of my locations on my web site for obvious reasons. I will however assist those that have been a part of the ghost town community for a period of time and have contributed to it, over someone that I know absolutly nothing about. Most vandals will not do the research needed to locate these places just to drive 100 miles in to the desert to deface them, however those with the exploration passion will usually do the necessary research to locate them.

BY TWO BITS

cheever
03-14-2007, 09:30 PM
There are a couple of locations that I am exploring that I am affraid to disclose more than a name and photo's because of vandalism, but even more because I fear that the BLM or Dept of Forestry will eliminate access if others start visiting. I realize that there are safety issues and that they may be liable if they are aware of an area that has potential hazzards and do not address them. Most times these are the most beautiful places to explore because they appear untouched. many times there is so much stuff that was left behind that all it takes is to look down at your feet to view or touch a piece of history. But if this information was shared with those who do not have the same beliefs and views, and a place becomes popular among visitors, explorers and vandals alike, it would most definately be taken away.

-catch 22-
if we don't share our passion and pass along our exploration enthusiam (did i spell that right) less people will fight for the right to keep these lands public in the future. Its a fine line, and one that should be considered..... My rule is; Careful who you divulge information to!

I personally do not include directions to most of my locations on my web site for obvious reasons. I will however assist those that have been a part of the ghost town community for a period of time and have contributed to it, over someone that I know absolutly nothing about. Most vandals will not do the research needed to locate these places just to drive 100 miles in to the desert to deface them, however those with the exploration passion will usually do the necessary research to locate them.

BY TWO BITS

Agreed. It is definitely a catch 22 these days. What really drives me nuts is when people use fake names on their website to protect a place and then don't tell you that the name is just an alias that they made up.

Also remember that I can only speak for what I find here in Utah, because I have not spent significant time outside of the state ghosttown hunting. Unfortunately here there are no safe places from BLM and the Forestry Service as they seem to be actively searching for every mining area/district that they can find to close down.

High Desert Drifter just out of curiosity if someone is honestly seeking to find one of your coveted areas and emails you to give them some hints on where to start looking do you help them?

I myself am an honest seeker of these places and am a member of goldrushexpeditions.com that actively seeks ways to get the government to back off of the mine reclamation efforts, but with that said I am somewhat challenged when it comes to finding hard to find areas and reasearching new areas. So, every once in a while I'll have to ask for help from people here (which are always very helpful) or ask the webmaster of the site that has something of interest on it. Unfortunately though when it comes to asking the webmaster for more info all but one time was I met with resistance. So my question to everyone is this, I am an honest seeker and am totally against vandalism of these places, but when I have exhausted all of my resources looking for an area to whom do I turn for help?

One quick example before I close. Also one note to the people whose website I found this particular mine on this is in no way an attack on you I am just using it as an example. I came across a website that had a mine named the Palmer mine. From the pictures and description it looked awesome so I researched it and researched it to try and find out where in Nevada it was located, but came up dry. So I ask the webmaster about it and he tells me is that he has spent many years finding and exploring mines and no one has ever helped him so why should he devulge this info to me. He did however offer to take me there on their next trip, but 2 years later they have yet to contact me so I think that it was just something that was said to try and pacify me. This is very frustrating to me and in turn to this day I am still empty handed. What to do what to do.

LauraA
03-15-2007, 05:26 AM
Cheever, We used to run into the same problem, people seemed unwilling to direct us to the locations we were reading and hearing about. We purchased a set of maps and key booklet from the Arizona Department of Mines and Minerals Resources Museum for our county. I don't know if your locale has anything similar? The maps have locations of pretty much all mines within the county, both the old ones and those currently operating. The maps don't identify road numbers but they do show locations and from there we've been able to figure out where they're located by cross-referencing with our forest service maps. (GPS would help.)
I feel pretty much the same way about disclosing locations, but if I feel that a person is sincere and not someone who will trash or pillage a location, I'll share my information with them or minimally, direct them to where to find the information they're looking for. If they go to all the trouble to find the information, they deserve to go, just like we did.
I suppose there's no way we can keep the Forest Service, BLM or the State from finding these locations, they've got the resources to go pretty much anywhere they want.
We've got a local community meeting tonight at the Forest Service, I plan on being as vocal as possible about what they're doing to these locations (for all the good it'll do) :(
The good news is, from what we've heard, the "Super Fund" money is running low and the chances that allocating more money before the elections will be pretty slim, this, at least, will slow them down in their "reclamation" efforts.


DMMR - Arizona Mining and Mineral Museum (http://mines.az.gov/General/museum.html)

LauraA
10-25-2007, 04:42 AM
I thought I might as well complete this post. We just recently found out the total cost of the Blue Bird "reclamation" was $79,000. I suppose in government dollars, this is a paltry sum and they're probably patting themselves on the back for getting such a bargain. Funny thing is, our Forest Service friend who told us the cost also said, "Eventually people break into the grates and we have to fix them." It's nice to know they're adding to the local economy by giving area contractors more work. :rolleyes:
I also asked him how they determine which adits to bulldoze and which to grate. He said that if there were bats living in the entrance, they put up a grate to protect their habitat, if not, they bulldoze. I know those of you who have also gone into mines have seen bats living much farther in than the entrance... imagine their surprise when they wake up and try to leave for the night and find their exit blocked.
Ah well, I can gripe and complain, but it seems there's little anyone can do to change the way things are progressing. We'd better enjoy these places and document them while we've still got them, they're disappearing at an alarming rate. :(

brian10x
10-26-2007, 04:17 AM
Well, it's the end of the Blue Bird Mine as we knew it. The Forest Service is doing a classic reclamation of the site. The old cabin is gone and soon, the adits to the mine shafts will be closed forever.
We were able to go today to watch the proceedings and bid the Blue Bird a sad good-bye.
The first hint that things were really proceeding was the road, it was like a super highway by comparison to what the road was like on previous visits. No more off-camber, tippy, stomach churning, seat grabbing, turns...the "pucker factor" has been eliminated. Bulldozers have been through and cleared the road to enable a 10 ton dump truck to have access. They've hauled in huge culvert-type metal pipes that are fitted with bars, these will be used to plug the mine adits, still allowing bats to enter and exit.
We thought it would be a sentimental touch to leave a bit of ourselves in the mine for future generations of would-be explorers so we put together a time capsule. In it we put a book of my poetry, a letter to whomever finds it, some current currency and coins, a newspaper and a few other assorted goodies....wonder if it'll ever be found...?
It's understandable to some extent to see why the government implements these changes, but on the other hand the mine tunnels themselves are rich in history and many of them have been around long enough to take on an almost natural appearance with stalagmites and stalactites beginning to form. The Blue Bird for example took on sparkling jewel-like reflections when the beams from our lights glanced over the faceted Azurite and Fluorite walls and ceilings.
We now have an old wooden chair from the Blue Bird sitting in our den, it was to have been hauled off too, we're lucky enough to have a piece of history.
The Forest Service will leave in place the ore conveyor as well as the ore chute for future explorers to marvel at. The mine's tunnels will be sitting, barred to entry so people will be left to speculate what it must be like deep within the dark and silent recesses.


This is where the old cabin stood
756
Drilling to put bars in place
757
Ralph checking it out
758
An old bat in the mine

759


The "good old days" of ghost towns are gone. It makes me sick thinking about it.

At least I have other hobbies (sigh)

LauraA
10-26-2007, 04:41 AM
The "good old days" of ghost towns are gone. It makes me sick thinking about it.

At least I have other hobbies (sigh)

Ahhh Brian, don't give up...you'll miss it and then find yourself re-equipping yourself to hit the trails again.
I'm emailing you an address of a guy who lives down your way who loves going out exploring. He's an older fella, but he's up for the chase and knows lots of good areas down there to go exploring.
Sorry I don't know any good looking young gals down your way, I only know old bats, like me.
Other hobbies are fine, but there's nothing like ghost towning, once the bug has bitten, you're infected for life. ;)

Gravelrash
10-26-2007, 01:52 PM
This is where the old cabin stood
Attachment 756 (http://forums.ghosttowns.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=756)
Drilling to put bars in place
Attachment 757 (http://forums.ghosttowns.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=757)


Vandalism, when done by "the powers that be" is still vandalism.
There is no justification for dozing the shack, no matter what "spin" is put on it.
History will condemn these actions, but too late, because the old timers won't be back to create a national history.
Very sad news.

bob3 was bob2
10-27-2007, 10:44 AM
There is one candidate who will do away or restrict these federal agencies, and leave it up to the State and local governments to decide what they want to destroy, protect, etc. I won't mention the candidates name since politics leads to arguments, but be sure to research each presidential candidate and vote. :)

LauraA
10-27-2007, 11:30 AM
but be sure to research each presidential candidate and vote. :)

GREAT advice bob3...research is the keyword!

GaryB
10-27-2007, 08:25 PM
You mean knee-jerk reactions like my local BLM makes are not the best idea?

These clowns here wouldn't know how to conserve a bottle of water during a hike, much less any site having historical significance. Even the other BLM offices are amazed at the lack of discretion taken by the LV office.

speedy
10-29-2007, 05:50 AM
PLEASE!!!!! could someone save us from the government that is "only here to help us"......Speedy

teds280z
07-31-2008, 07:03 AM
Since they are sealing them we should unseal them. Anything that goes has to have a way to come out or try to by-pass there block. I haven't figured how to save the towns buildings yet. Maybe place claymores set for heavy equiptment around the site:rolleyes:

LauraA
07-31-2008, 01:15 PM
Ted, As tempting as that might sound, I sure wouldn't want to get caught messing with removing or tampering with government property. (my militant days are long gone);):D
It's my belief that the only way to save these sites is envolvement with groups dedicated to preservation. Of course, writing letters and making phone calls to Senators and Congressmen doesn't hurt either.

teds280z
07-31-2008, 02:23 PM
I totally agree with you Laura and I think sometimes Senator Reed gets tired of hearing from me but he does answer when he can or his aid. The Govenor here never lets you know if he gets the e-mail but he has so much on his plate, like his mistress, divorce, not able to balance the state budget. 2 years NV had a surplus and gave back some through auto registration rebates. I really hate when the few ruin things for those of us that care.

High Desert Drifter
07-31-2008, 11:25 PM
Sorry to hear about your "Blue Bird" Laura... she will be missed. hope you took plenty of pictures to share with the local historical society who in turn will share with the general public and those with interest.

about the only way I know to save these places from the BLM is to form a organization much like they did in the Mojave Desert for "Last Chance Canyon" ie. Friends of Last Chance Canyon. Organize and get others interested in the site and its protection, enlist the assistance of the historic societies and contact the state for historic landmark nomination. sometimes asking for this status will delay the BLM from its destruction while they await the states decission. this will give you time to enlist the assistance and develop a propaganda campain strong enough to fight the blm should the state deny your request.

lot of work, but worth it if you can save a hand full of these places....

LauraA
08-01-2008, 03:14 AM
Hey Frank, good to see you. You're right, organization of a group of like-minded people would be the way to go. I simply don't have the energy I once did when I was younger. I suppose I'll have to leave it for the youth, hopefully, they'll take an interest. This site and others like it help to spark an interest.
We're devoting our energies to trying to keep our local trails open for public access.1842

In our case, it's the Forest Service we're dealing with. We've found that once a site has been designated for "reclamation" there's nothing we can do to try to save it. They've been allocated the funds and it burns a hole in their pockets until it's spent on bulldozers and dump trucks.

Meanwhile, we'll continue to visit as many of these sites as possible and take lots of pictures...offering them to whoever wants them.

High Desert Drifter
08-06-2008, 10:54 PM
Ok, I think I found a solution... We need to go to UC Berkley where those crazy tree huggers have built tree houses in the trees to stop them from building the new football stadium. I think if we can get past the feces slinging and their hairy legs we might be able to convience them to stand for a real cause, being that of protecting the very existance of historic mines and sites on the BLM's reclaimation lists!

sorry... sometimes I joke to get past the stupidity of the BLM...

brian10x
08-07-2008, 04:00 AM
Ok, I think I found a solution... We need to go to UC Berkley where those crazy tree huggers have built tree houses in the trees to stop them from building the new football stadium. I think if we can get past the feces slinging and their hairy legs we might be able to convience them to stand for a real cause, being that of protecting the very existance of historic mines and sites on the BLM's reclaimation lists!

sorry... sometimes I joke to get past the stupidity of the BLM...

All true-
We also need to make their weirdness work against them-
They won't bulldoze a ghosttown if there is an endangered species living there. I swear I saw a humpback whale!

LauraA
08-07-2008, 05:08 AM
I swear I saw a humpback whale!

Sorry to disappoint you Brian, that was me....come to think of it though, at my age, I'm an endangered species too. :o

Joel
08-09-2008, 12:19 AM
Sorry!
Actually that was me wearing a sombreo and a zarape. About 20 folks went running across the road the road and dove ito their cars at warp speed. Seems that I was listed as "Nesie", "Bigfoot", "New Jersey Devil" and the "Lost Continent of Mu". I thought I was only trying to do a Benny Hill type video with the Minutemen.

Must need to go on a diet! Mistaken for a contient indeed!:mad:

No Thunbs Dutch
01-31-2011, 03:36 PM
Well, it's the end of the Blue Bird Mine as we knew it. The Forest Service is doing a classic reclamation of the site. The old cabin is gone and soon, the adits to the mine shafts will be closed forever.
We were able to go today to watch the proceedings and bid the Blue Bird a sad good-bye.
The first hint that things were really proceeding was the road, it was like a super highway by comparison to what the road was like on previous visits. No more off-camber, tippy, stomach churning, seat grabbing, turns...the "pucker factor" has been eliminated. Bulldozers have been through and cleared the road to enable a 10 ton dump truck to have access. They've hauled in huge culvert-type metal pipes that are fitted with bars, these will be used to plug the mine adits, still allowing bats to enter and exit.
We thought it would be a sentimental touch to leave a bit of ourselves in the mine for future generations of would-be explorers so we put together a time capsule. In it we put a book of my poetry, a letter to whomever finds it, some current currency and coins, a newspaper and a few other assorted goodies....wonder if it'll ever be found...?
It's understandable to some extent to see why the government implements these changes, but on the other hand the mine tunnels themselves are rich in history and many of them have been around long enough to take on an almost natural appearance with stalagmites and stalactites beginning to form. The Blue Bird for example took on sparkling jewel-like reflections when the beams from our lights glanced over the faceted Azurite and Fluorite walls and ceilings.
We now have an old wooden chair from the Blue Bird sitting in our den, it was to have been hauled off too, we're lucky enough to have a piece of history.
The Forest Service will leave in place the ore conveyor as well as the ore chute for future explorers to marvel at. The mine's tunnels will be sitting, barred to entry so people will be left to speculate what it must be like deep within the dark and silent recesses.


This is where the old cabin stood
756
Drilling to put bars in place
757
Ralph checking it out
758
An old bat in the mine
759

Hey Laura, this is truly some sad news. I can't believe they will waste money destroying part of history.....
I remember going there as a kid and it does make me sad that this and many other mines will be wiped ff the map because some idiot did not use common sense and think about safety and possibly caused death or bodly harm to them selves or the family. I am sure these mines are beshut because of the paople who just did not think before reacting.

BTW, my screen name reads No thunbs tommy, but this is Jacob"ShiftyEyed"Waltz. How my name got messed up, I haven't a clue. I started a thread about this issue and am awaiting for a moderator to post it.....I have no idea how this no thumbs tommy came into play...LOL

Hope all is well with you and yours ;)

LauraA
02-03-2011, 04:16 PM
Hi Shifty! Sorry to read about your issues, hope all's well now.
Yes, it's sad to see another bit of our history destroyed... all in the name of "safety". In my opinion signs posted warning of the danger of old mine shafts should have been sufficient, but I guess they figure the general population can't read.:rolleyes:
We're well here, getting over nasty colds but other than that..we're fine and enjoying the cold temperatures.