PDA

View Full Version : Texas, New Mexico Ghost towns



lee42lee
10-11-2007, 08:31 AM
My brother is on a road trip and he called me and wanted me to find a few ghost towns he can see while he is out that way. Right now he is in Abilene, TX but he will be going into New Mexico next. Can someone list a few good places he can see. It doesn't have to be close to where he is because he doesn't have a exact trip planned and he still has to drive back home to GA. Thanks for any help.

Lee

HollyDolly
10-18-2007, 08:44 AM
:p Well,not sure on new Mexico,but I assume he may drive back through Texas on his way home.Out in that area is Shafter,Juno, Vinegaroone,Castalon,Terlingua,and several others. I don't know if Interstate 10 runs towards Georgia,but here in Texas,in the San Antonio area,there is Zunkerville,Peggy,El Oso,Leal,Coughran, Loire, Zuhel,Dewville,Pandora, Bebe,Verdi, Caddo,Blackhills,Fairview,Hackberry, Praha,Cheapside,Ottine,Garfield,GlazeCity,
New Davy,Denhawken,New Berlin, SweetHome,and Sutherland Springs to name a few. Ottine has Palmetto State Park and is near Gonzales which has a nice park on the Guadalupe River.
There's also Anhalt and Bergheim near Boerne and Guadalupe State Park,if he wanted to camp out or have a picnic.

DR505
10-20-2007, 08:22 AM
If you have your brother head over to the Southeast area of New Mexico, there are some nice examples of ghost towns there. I really like Mogollon in Catron County.
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1047/1387909021_85ce05ce94_m.jpg

Another great place to stop is Pinos Altos just north of Silver City. Try eating at the Buckhorn Saloon. It is attached to the Pinos Altos Opera House.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1097/1388807356_5f0b8afbbc_m.jpg

40FORDJIM
10-20-2007, 08:39 AM
DR505,
I think you mean to say SouthWEST New Mexico. The two towns you mentioned are neat. Pinos Altos is only 7 miles north of me. Shakespeare and old Hatchita are worth a visit too.

DR505
10-20-2007, 06:18 PM
Whoops! I certainly DID mean southWEST New Mexico!

tuutuutango
10-21-2007, 10:53 AM
Not sure if I am doing this correct, but this replay is for the poster who has a brother passing through Abilene (where I am) looking for New Mexico ghost towns.

I'd say stop in Mogollon for a great adventure and see the cat walk not too far from there while in the area.

Shafter, Texas is between Abilene and El Paso (sort of) and is another neat place to visit.

I plan on being in Mogollon at the end of October and would be happy to meet anybody there who needs more info about the area. I first started visting Mogollon in the late 1960s and explored some of the old mine shafts. All are sealed off now, and not a good idea to go into them anyway.

Walkingsticks
10-25-2007, 09:35 PM
Had I found this forum months ago I would be able to tell you about most of the ghost towns or semi ghost towns in southern New Mexico as I live in Sierra County where we have several and have visited dozens in Lincoln, Socorro, Catron, Hidago, Luna, Grant, Cibola, Eddy, Oteo,Torrance and Dona Ana counties complete with dozens of pictures, as my friend and I are always going to ghost towns throughout New Mexico and parts of Arizona year around. We have even been to Texas and found some. I look up the history on them once we find them. Last week we discovered Malone in Grant County in the Burro Mountains, at least what was left of it. Mogollon and Pino Altos are not really ghost towns as people are still living in them year round and all of property is bought up. But we have been to true ghost towns; Andrews, Gold Dust,Percha City, Wicks, Coalburg, Marion, Palomas Gap, Old Palomas, Marcial, Rosedale, Kelly, Graham, Lake Valley, Cookes Peak, Grama, Jicarilla, Mule Creek, Salt Lake, Royal John, Pie Town, (partially a ghost town) Steins and several more I forgot the names of. We have come upon several mining camps and even old forts still standing, but lost and not on any maps. We go as far as we can by four wheel drive, then back pack down fading trails and sometimes no trails, but through deep canyons to get to the towns. A few are in good shape and others just ruins. We found old wagons with their wheels missing, old cars from the teens, ore carts in mines, houses over a hundred years old with window panes still in them and furniture inside the houses. Old forts with lists of names of soldiers on duty going back to the late 1860's and we have found lots of old equipment and antiques I have throughout my house and even in my yard. We travel year around and several times a month. We prefer winter when the snakes go under ground, but prefer camping in the summer in the high mountains when it is warmer. Some towns we spend the night in in our tent. We want to go to Jose in Luna
County which is nearly 8,000 feet high which was occupied for 42 years and was a mining town high on a mountain top.

Gravelrash
10-26-2007, 02:09 AM
Walkingsticks, hello. You sound like a fabulous source of information. When you say things like...
We have come upon several mining camps and even old forts still standing, but lost and not on any maps. Old forts with lists of names of soldiers on duty going back to the late 1860's and we have found lots of old equipment and antiques
.... you really will get some serious attention!
I'd love to have been on one of those discovery trips with you!
I don't know if you have accessed the interactive map on the homepage of this website, but there's a state by state, county by county listing of the ghost towns people have located, explored and photographed. Some that you mentioned are there, but you've also mentioned quite a few that are not, such as Percha City, Wicks, Coalburg, Palomas Gap, Old Palomas, Marcial, Grama, Mule Creek and Pie Town. I'm sure we'd all love to share your finds! Photos are a big plus!!
I'm sure everyone would love to hear more from you.

Walkingsticks
11-09-2007, 10:11 PM
I got some really neat photos (over 5,000) on CD's I took with my digital camera of the many places we have been.
And two days ago we got some really nice photos around Hadley and Cooks I would love to post.

See my thread on Jose, Cooks and Hadley I posted today.

Walkingsticks
11-09-2007, 10:35 PM
They got me down as a couch potatoe.
If you call hiking 16 miles up very steep (35% slope) trails carrying a fifteen pound back pack in two days to reach two ghost towns a couch potatoe, then I guess I am a couch potatoe.
In fact between my partner and myself we cover several hundred miles hiking every year, year around and both of us are health nuts. I am going on 76, he going on 54 and both neither drink alcoholic beverages nor use tobacco or drugs.
We eat very healthy meals and are constantly active when I am not home on the computer or working on my book.
Him and I have visited so many ghost towns and historical sites in New Mexico, Arizona and Texas over the last four years I would need several pages to list them all. The ones we go to are very hard to back pack into and many times we have to hike through deep gorges and up steep mountain trails as the roads are either all washed out or we can't find them because brush and trees have grown up in them.
I am an experienced ghost towner as I have been visiting ghost towns for 63 years starting at age twelve when I used to hike with my older brother to Arizona ghost towns where I grew up.
Many of those towns are long gone now. I have visited ghost towns in California, Oregon, Washington, Montana, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Michigan, Wyoming, Colorado and South Dakota in those 63 years when many of those towns still were standing and their furnishings still inside.
So I am no "couch potatoe" by a long shot.:mad:

Gravelrash
11-10-2007, 01:44 AM
Walkingsticks - cheer up, mate, the "couch potato" moniker is just the way the website rates people. The more you post, the more your status changes.
I've never been anywhere near an American ghost town but I'm no longer a "couch potato" - Yipeee!

You post some of those 5,000 photos and you'll be a "Rock Crawlin GPS Moving Map Totin Trailblazing Expert Ghost Towner" in the wink of an eye.... and you'll have a lot of friends too. The more photos of those wonderful old places, the better. Cheers up all of us who are still working for the Yankee dollar.
(Or Australian, as the case may be!;) )
I hope we see some photos soon.

mainmanwalkin
11-11-2007, 06:38 AM
Walkingsticks - cheer up, mate, the "couch potato" moniker is just the way the website rates people. The more you post, the more your status changes.
I've never been anywhere near an American ghost town but I'm no longer a "couch potato" - Yipeee!

Yeah, the only one that sort of bothered me was "Public Library ghost towner" --I'm strictly an internet guy. Going to the library to research ghost towns sounds too much like actual work! :)

Gravelrash
11-11-2007, 10:24 AM
Mainwalkingman - You're amongst friends. We'd never accuse you of working!:rolleyes:

Are you familiar with Maynard G Crebs? He has our motto.

Tyroler
11-11-2007, 11:38 AM
What is near Wichita Falls?

Tyroler
11-11-2007, 11:49 AM
Rush Springs

http://home.flash.net/~mvincent/OldHistory.htm
copy:

"The History of Rush Springs"
Preface
About 65 miles southwest of Oklahoma City near the junction of Highways 81 and 17, there is a sign that says
"Welcome to Rush Springs, home of 1500 happy faces and a few old soreheads".

In 1770, the Wichitas were harassed by the Osages and Pawnees of La Platte. One village escaped to the
present site of Wichita Falls, Texas. Another moved farther west to Cache Creek to the mouth of Medicine
Bluff Creek and built their lodges on the present site of Fort Sill polo field. Another attack by the Osages at
the end of the eighteenth century, forced the Wichitas at Wichita Falls and Fort Sill to move up the Red
River to a place they called Twin Mountains. One village settled on the Brazos River in Texas, while
another part moved up the north Fork of the Red River.

ghost_town_huntress
11-11-2007, 12:00 PM
Wow, Dan Quayle's back with the potatoe, not the potato.

Rachel in Utah ghost_town_huntress@yahoo.com

They got me down as a couch potatoe.
If you call hiking 16 miles up very steep (35% slope) trails carrying a fifteen pound back pack in two days to reach two ghost towns a couch potatoe, then I guess I am a couch potatoe.
In fact between my partner and myself we cover several hundred miles hiking every year, year around and both of us are health nuts. I am going on 76, he going on 54 and both neither drink alcoholic beverages nor use tobacco or drugs.
We eat very healthy meals and are constantly active when I am not home on the computer or working on my book.
Him and I have visited so many ghost towns and historical sites in New Mexico, Arizona and Texas over the last four years I would need several pages to list them all. The ones we go to are very hard to back pack into and many times we have to hike through deep gorges and up steep mountain trails as the roads are either all washed out or we can't find them because brush and trees have grown up in them.
I am an experienced ghost towner as I have been visiting ghost towns for 63 years starting at age twelve when I used to hike with my older brother to Arizona ghost towns where I grew up.
Many of those towns are long gone now. I have visited ghost towns in California, Oregon, Washington, Montana, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Michigan, Wyoming, Colorado and South Dakota in those 63 years when many of those towns still were standing and their furnishings still inside.
So I am no "couch potatoe" by a long shot.:mad:

speedy
11-12-2007, 07:48 AM
Tyroler, there are several towns east of Wichita Falls, and a few west of there also. Are you looking to go east or west? I can name a few for you, and the directions are on this web site....Speedy