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utah-ghost
12-20-2007, 02:26 PM
I am in need of a ghost town trip, but I live too far north to go to my usual places. Can anyone suggest a remote (deserted) ghost town in north-west Arizona or southern Nevada that would be good for a little winter camping trip?

bad bob
12-20-2007, 11:02 PM
W NV - Rhyolite.

Bob
12-21-2007, 06:58 AM
Howdy. Need more information about your expectations and desert prowess. You say camping? Do you need nearby facilities? Does having a town like Beatty within 10 miles fit your wants or would a couple stone buildings. a chance of finding square nails, and the prospect of a week or two without another human within 10 miles more suit your adventure. Hiking ability, desert survival skills and off-highway driving savvy are necessary for the later.

Do you want to research before you investigate or do you want some well know places? Places like Rhyolite have spectacular ruins and just down the road are stores and facilities. There are interesting sites in Nevada with the very real likelihood that you could be there months before encountering another human. What kind of adventure are you up for? Would something in between this range of solitude fit your bill?

Do you mind waking up to frost on your equipment or do you want to go from your sleeping bag to a sweatshirt and short sleeves by midday? I know a lot of places in Nevada and northwest Arizona.

The week or weekend you are planning on camping might help. I will be in hills west of Parker on the 5 of January and there usually good ghost town opportunities but that weekend we will be closing many of the access roads and having a professional Off-road race in the area.

utah-ghost
12-24-2007, 07:00 AM
I have been going to ghost towns and exploring the desert since 1979. I have also been driving remote dirt roads the same amount of time.

I am used to camping in 113 degrees with no water or shade within miles, and I have occasionaly camped in snow and in deep forests (Utah and Colorado).

I am used to locating sites with maps (which I have collected many of over the years) and by (good and bad) directions, and I have even located a quite a few ghost towns just by following remote dirt roads for hours on end, although I would prefer not to spend that much time locating and do more exploring this time.

I strongly prefer remote ghost towns. No care takers, operating mines, or residents please. I do not wish to be run off after I have gone to the trouble of driving a day or more get there, nor do I wish to be told where I can and can't go when I'm there.

I would like a site with a standing building or two, but a good area with a lot to explore (mines and such) will do just as well too.

I do have a 4WD pickup (stock), but I am not looking for that type of adventure on this trip so I would prefer a area that is suitable for a 2 WD pickup.

I am used to going to the desert without the need of any nearby services. I take at least 20 gallons of drinking water and additional water for my truck, parts and tools for minor vehicle repairs, and I am used to being alone in remote areas for a week or so at a time. I do like and would prefer a gas station within 100 miles or so of where I go off pavement just to top off my tank, expecially since I might be going into an area that I am unfamiluar with, but I do not need any local services beyond that.

I do not like cold, and that's why I am looking for something a little warmer than the Utah and northern Nevada ghost towns that I know well and have been to. 45 degrees or more in the daytime is OK, and I have a sleeping bag that's rated at zero degrees for the nights. I usually use a small tent or sleep in the pickup bed which has a shell.

I do not want to do any hiking to get to the site since I prefer to keep my vehicle (and supplies) within a reasonable distance. A little hiking once there is OK, but I am in my late 40s.

This trip will ocour sometime in the 1st to 3rd week of January 2008.

Feel free to ask me more qestions if you need to, and feel free to send a private message too.

utah-ghost
12-24-2007, 07:05 AM
I have been researching and going to ghost towns and exploring the desert since 1979. I have also been driving remote dirt roads the same amount of time.

I am used to camping in 113 degrees with no water or shade within miles, and I have occasionaly camped in snow and in deep forests (Utah and Colorado).

I am used to locating sites with maps (which I have collected many of over the years) and by (good and bad) directions, and I have even located a quite a few ghost towns and mining areas just by following remote dirt roads for hours on end, although I would prefer not to spend that much time locating and do more exploring on this trip.

I strongly prefer remote ghost towns. No care takers, operating mines, or residents please. I do not wish to be run off after I have gone to the trouble of driving a day or more get there, nor do I wish to be told where I can and can't go when I'm there.

I would like a site with a standing building or two, but a good area with a lot to explore (mines and such) will do just as well too.

I do have a 4WD pickup (stock), but I am not looking for that type of adventure on this trip so I would prefer a area that is suitable for a 2 WD pickup.

I am used to going to the desert without the need of any nearby services. I take at least 20 gallons of drinking water and additional water for my truck, parts and tools for minor vehicle repairs, and I am used to being alone in remote areas for a week or so at a time. I do like and I would prefer a gas station within 100 miles or so of where I go off pavement just to top off my tank, expecially since I might be going into an area that I am unfamiluar with, but I do not need any local services beyond that.

I do not like cold, and that's why I am looking for something a little warmer than the Utah and northern Nevada ghost towns that I know well and have been to. 45 degrees or more in the daytime is OK, and I have a sleeping bag that's rated at zero degrees for the nights. I usually use a small tent or sleep in the pickup bed which has a shell.

I do not want to do any hiking to get to the site since I prefer to keep my vehicle (and supplies) within a reasonable distance. A little hiking once there is OK, but I am in my late 40s.

This trip is planned for sometime in the 1st to 3rd week of January 2008, although it might get pushed back into February.

Please feel free to ask me more qestions if you need to, and feel free to send a private message too.

Bob
12-24-2007, 12:50 PM
I was semi-aware of your reputation as a responsible ghosttowner, but didn’t know your expectations. I can think of several remove places where good exploring could be had. I figure the Arizona Strip was a bit cool this time of year and the roads are terrible whenever it snows or rains so I was thinking “little known” and “under-explored” and "more dry" places.

The site I actually had my mind when I suggested square nails was the Crescent Mill East of Tempiute on the west side of Mt. Irish. The road is more of a sand wash and the last time I was there I almost got stuck in a well-equipped Ford Bronco. It is remote, doesn’t have cell service, and if you got into a jam, the nearest communities Rachel and Hiko are about 20 miles or more away. If you should decide to 4wd there sometime, drop me a PM and I’ll dig out some of my research notes.

The other sites on Mt. Irish are on the east slope of the mountain. These sites, like Crescent City, Logan, Silver City etc are accessible via roads you can drive a 2wd vehicle on. They are loads of Petroglyphs on the East side of Mt. Irish and again, it is kinda remote. Snow is unlikely but possible.

Another Southern Lincoln County location would be Delamar, again accessible by 2wd and you might run into someone there on the weekend. If you haven’t ever explored it, you should sometime. Plenty of information is available on Delamar.

Another southern Lincoln Country “little known” and “under-explored” ghost would be Viola. Some interesting mining ruins, nothing much standing but all sorts of stuff to explore within a few miles.

Another secret treasure might be Oneota. Took me a couple tries to find it (USGS hasn’t got a clue). General vicinity is Water Gap and the only remaining building is collapsed. An interesting dam, a root cellar, a old corral will make you wonder about this early 1900s community but after four or five hours, I was bored.

There is some neat stuff in Mohave and La Paz County Arizona for exploring. I tend to like stuff not well known. There were three routes from Nevada to mines in Northwest Mohave county. Exploring these routes can be fun and rewarding. Camping on the along the river opposite Cottonwood Island (Under Lake Mojave), or Bonelli’s Ferry (Under Lake Mead) or Camp El Dorado (Colorado River a bit wide but still flowing from Hoover Dam) can yield interesting exploring and camp. Bonelli’s Ferry was the main river crossing for Mohave County, Arizona mining camps like White Hills, Cerbat, and Mineral Park to get supplies from Southern Utah. All of those sites are well know but getting the feel of the land. Mail and Stage routes ran from Ferry’s from the El Dorado Ferry and Cottonwood Island to Arizona towns when Nelson and Searchlight were booming. I know the roads and pit falls to all these but prefer to PM you the details if anything excites you.