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GaryB
03-05-2008, 08:18 AM
This thread is to be used for posting of books of any sort that can be used in referencing Ghost Towns and Historical Sites.

Whether they be a favorite map book, writings of famous people from historical eras and places, or just a book covering the topic at hand that you feel is worth mentioning, feel free to post it up here for others to find.

Please keep in mind the copyright laws when posting any information from a book.

GaryB
03-05-2008, 08:30 AM
I'll get it started ;)

Walter R. Averett grew up in Carp, NV and has written two very informative, and enjoyable books on the surrounding area (Lincoln County, NV) titled:

"Through the Rainbow Canyon" ISBN 0-87062-237-4

"Beyond the Ranges" ISBN 0-87062-279-x

Both books are written using researched information, and notes taken from first hand accounts or the occasional recollection. Both are also full of old photos of the places in discussion, making them alone worth the read.

The only bad thing is they are currently out of print, but I have seen them used on Amazon.com and they can be found on Ebay occasionally.

Bob
03-05-2008, 10:07 AM
I'll get it started ;)

Walter R. Averett grew up in Carp, NV and has written two very informative, and enjoyable books on the surrounding area (Lincoln County, NV) titled:

"Through the Rainbow Canyon" ISBN 0-87062-237-4

"Beyond the Ranges" ISBN 0-87062-279-x

Both books are written using researched information, and notes taken from first hand accounts or the occasional recollection. Both are also full of old photos of the places in discussion, making them alone worth the read.

The only bad thing is they are currently out of print, but I have seen them used on Amazon.com and they can be found on Ebay occasionally.


Walt and I sometimes communicate. He lives in Grand Junction, Colorado and the first book he wrote “Directory of Southern Nevada Place Names” is also a must for exploring in Clark and Lincoln County. I used that book as a starting place for much of the research I have done!

oro-y-plata
03-05-2008, 12:59 PM
A new book, recently published is "Ghost Towns and Mining Districts of Montana', for those of you that are interestested in Montana Ghost towns and mining history.
It divides the state into counties and then into mining districts. Each mining district lists its history from its original location, its mining production, and the history of any camps, towns, (or in the case of Butte and Helena) cities that are now or where there. It is illustrated with archival photos and current photos so that the reader can compare what a place was like then, as to what remains today. It was thoroughly researched and 95% of the places were visited by the author. It can be reviewed or purchased on line at www.terryhalden.com (http://www.terryhalden.com) or at any Hastings Store in Montana.
It has been compared favorably with Muriel Sibell Woole's "Montana Pay Dirt" which since it's publication in the 1950s has been considered the bible with respect to Montana Ghost Town books.

LauraA
03-06-2008, 03:12 PM
One of the best resources we've found is a set of maps from The Arizona Department of Mines and Mineral Resources. The form to order maps for your specific county can be found here, DMMR - Publication List (http://www.admmr.state.az.us/Publications/index.html) The maps can't be ordered online, but you can print out the form and send a check. Maps are fairly inexpensive and each set comes with a "key" booklet, identifying the mine and the minerals it produced. I suspect many states that have mining taking place would offer something similar.

LauraA
03-06-2008, 03:25 PM
Some good reading about the early pioneers of Gila County can be found here. Git A Rope Publishing, Art And Antiques Inc. (http://www.gitarope.com/More_Books/index.html) We've got several of their books, including "Pioneer Women of Gila County" a two volume set. The books are comprised of first person reports from the early settlers in Gila County. Interesting reading and a with a bit of detective work, it's a good resource for finding some of the bygone, out of the way ranches and towns.

Paladin
03-06-2008, 04:54 PM
I just got "Southern Idaho Ghost Towns" by Wayne Sparling. Pretty good book. It has a brief history of each GT/mine, b&w pictures. The maps are pretty crude, not very detailed, but they are somewhat useful. If your interested in GT's in Southern ID, this book has a lot of GT's in it I hadn't heard of. It's worth the $10 or so for the book...

Mikejts
03-06-2008, 05:57 PM
Wow :cool:

Good topic, I just went into my Library, (actually the family room in the basement) I was going to list some of my favorites. As I stood there in front of 7 book shelves all over 7 ft tall and 4 ft wide I realized it was a task I did not want to tackle. Did I mention the drafting board with a stack of maps? I have books and Journals dating back to the late 1800s and early 1900's for the US. Journels from foreign countries as late as the 17 century. Actually my favorite there is the German Dr journal and how he practices medicine.

Anyway I digress. One of the ones I recently uncovered was the WPA works done in the late 30's and early 40's as part of the "New Deal" and the "Federal Writers Project". typically realatively inexpense ( unlike some of my other books) and available for numerous states. Another good source for old ghost town books is the local "Friends of the Library" book sales. That is how I filled most of the bookshelves.

teds280z
03-13-2008, 09:20 AM
I have had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Stanley Paher who wrote Nevada Ghost and Mining Towns. This is a great three book series, The main hardback has history of alot of Nevada's history and then he has two paperback books(Northern and Southern)Which have a little history about sites and maps to help locate these. If your in Nevada you ought to check these out.

Mikejts
03-14-2008, 10:00 AM
@&#^ another book I don't have... Sounds like some good info.

GaryB
03-15-2008, 06:59 AM
I have had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Stanley Paher who wrote Nevada Ghost and Mining Towns. This is a great three book series, The main hardback has history of alot of Nevada's history and then he has two paperback books(Northern and Southern)Which have a little history about sites and maps to help locate these. If your in Nevada you ought to check these out.


I second the Paher books. Any of them really, as he has quite a few. The ghost town Atlas also comes in a combined form (the one I use) and is supposed to be more updated map wise.

"Nevada Ghost Town and Mining Camps"

This book goes more into the history of why, what and who than actually where.

ISBN-13: 978-0913814048

Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/Nevada-Ghost-Towns-Mining-Historical/dp/0913814040/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1205592475&sr=1-11


"Nevada Ghost Towns & Mining Camps: Illustrated Atlas"

This book is more of "where" than the other. It has simple maps that can get you there, though I'd recommend arming yourself with either the DeLorme or Benchmark Nevada Atlas's to be safe. This book comes in either paperback or hardbound. This particular linked one is hard bound.

ISBN-13: 978-0913814116

Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/Nevada-Ghost-Towns-Mining-Camps/dp/0913814113/ref=pd_sim_b_img_1



While on Amazon, you can see some of his other books available. Borders and B. Dalton also sell his books.

LauraA
04-03-2008, 06:10 AM
"Catch The Stage To Phoenix" written by Leland L. Hanchett, Jr.
A terrific book filled with historical accounts of the stagecoaches that ran from various points in Arizona to Phoenix. It's got loads of great photos and maps.
I believe it can still be purchased from Pine Rim Products (http://www.pinerim.com/pine_rim_publishing_002.htm)

Joel
05-10-2008, 03:27 PM
I went to a used bookstore today and found Ghosts and Ghost Towns Southeastern Arizona by W. J. "Jack" Way published in 1968 (2nd Edition) original edition 1966. Looks like a vanity press thing sold by the Tombstone Restoration Commission.

I could cry. Looking at the pictures of Black Diamond, Middlemarch, Washington Camp, Oro Blanco and others. So much has vanished, closed off or been destroyed since 1966.
He gives directions, will try to see how good they are after all the years (dubious at best!) and see what is still left. I would like to see Richmond and Watervale. Tombstone is just a tourist trap.

LauraA
05-10-2008, 04:20 PM
I found this link for a bookseller in Scottsdale, AZ. Check out his Western titles. I haven't ordered anything from him yet, but I can see it happening in the very near future. Guidon Books (http://www.guidon.com/)

Joel
05-11-2008, 05:18 AM
It does look like quite a place to bookmark! Am currently reading GHOSTS OF THE ADOBE WALLS by Nell Murbarger 1964 Westernlore Press. She details her travels to hundreds of Arizona Ghost Towns in the '50's and '60's.
Obviously, the sheer numbers and quality of the areas have declined since her day. Still a great read.

LauraA
05-11-2008, 02:24 PM
Ghosts Of The Adobe Walls is a great read. I found my copy on Amazon. Sadly for us, Nell Murbarger saw these places while they were in their "prime" (as prime as a ghost town can be).
There's a quote written by Rollin Dagget, she uses in the forward of her book, "I drink alone and in silence, to the builders of the West: Long life to the hearts still beating, And peace to the hearts that rest."
To that, I say Amen...

GaryB
05-11-2008, 09:44 PM
Nell Murbarger is considered by many as the creator of "Ghost Towning". Her pictures and stories got a lot of people interested in going to these places, as well as motivating many to help preserve them. Anything you can find by her is worth the effort IMO.

Joel
05-12-2008, 04:46 AM
I concur. So far, it's been a fantastic read. She bounces all over Arizona and describes the ruins so well!
So many ruins, so little time!

Joel
06-08-2008, 03:28 PM
Has anyone read GALEYVILLE, ARIZONA TERRORITY 1880: ITS HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY by Brooks White? I picked it up the other week in Tombstone and haven't had a chance to read it yet? I talked to the clerk about Richmond and Watervale. She was an old timer there, just two years and had never heard of them.

Vulture
06-09-2008, 06:54 AM
Has anyone read GALEYVILLE, ARIZONA TERRORITY 1880: ITS HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY by Brooks White? I picked it up the other week in Tombstone and haven't had a chance to read it yet? I talked to the clerk about Richmond and Watervale. She was an old timer there, just two years and had never heard of them.

I read it, long on archaeology & short on history, but worth a spin. Other than Ringo's hijacking a poker game & Curly Bill's being shot in the mouth I've not run across much factual history on Galeyville.

I can recommend the book for it's in depth ****ysis of shoe buttons.
<

I just previewed this & the fushluginer censor removed a n a l from part of a word. how **** is that?!

<<

Joel
06-13-2008, 04:17 PM
"Shoe buttons?" Oh my!

oro-y-plata
07-03-2008, 03:07 PM
Joel, following your mention of 'Ghosts and Ghost Towns' by W.J.Jack Way, I tried Alibris.com and managed to get a second printing of the book for $2.75. As you said, the photos make you cry for what was there in the 60's and what little there is now. I took a photo of the school house arch in Gleeson, years ago and that's gone now.

Joel
07-03-2008, 03:14 PM
Yes, they seem to be coming down quickly these days. It's very painfull to see the comparisions between then and now.
Of course, with the economy going the way it is, we might be having a new bumper crop of ghost towns soon. :mad:

Norman Johnson
07-03-2008, 05:57 PM
I just want to mention a few but need to preface this with the understanding that there are two kinds of GT's in eastern CA.---those associated with mines and those associated with a route to get to the coast.
Southern California's Best Ghost Towns, by Philip Varney; Death Valley and the Amargosa, by Lingenfelter; Death Valley to Yosemite: Frontier Mining Camps and Ghost Towns, by Belden and DeDecker, Searchlight, by Harry Reid (yes, that Harry Reid); The Rhyolite Hearld Pictorial Supplement; China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station, Sixty Years of protecting Our Heritage Resources --18 month calendar--July 2004-Dec 2005; Mojave Road Guide, by Casebier; Mines of the High Desert, by R. D. Miller; Mines of Death Valley, by L. B. Beldon;Mines of the Mojave, by Ron and Peggy Miller; Mines of the San Bernardinos, by John Robinson; Mines of the San Gabriels, by same; California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 47, #1, Jan. 1951; and The Human Journey & Ancient Life in California's Deserts. I could go on and on. But the other half of the equation is the story of the people and the individuals that came through, populated, stirred up and destroyed, and then the people who rediscovered those historical towns and places. Yes, we are part of the equation whether we understand it or not. NJ

Tsarevna
07-03-2008, 10:09 PM
"Dame Shirley" was a woman in the northern California gold rush. Her husband was a doctor who treated the miners in the Feather River Canyon area.

She describes riding on a donkey to reach the canyon, the people working the river placer deposits, and various buildings and miniature towns that sprang up during the gold rush boom.

Her stories are colorful and never boring. Various medical tragedies are described, as well as the stories of the diverse group of people who tried to make a living in the wild-west.

She describes the ghost town of Rich Bar (near Belden.) The river has reclaimed the town, but a historic plaque marks the spot today. Various other northern California ghost towns are mentioned, such as Bidwell's Bar.

The book is free online, as it is old enough to be without copyright.

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/23280

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23280/23280-h/23280-h.htm

It can also be purchased in print from places like Amazon.com, as newer editions contain enlightening forwards and notations.

http://www.amazon.com/Shirley-Letters-Calfornia-Mines-1851-1852/dp/1890771007/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1215151312&sr=8-1

The exact title of the book is
The Shirley Letters from
California Mines
In 1851-52



Except from the 23rd letter:


November 21, 1852.

To our unbounded surprise, we found, on our return from the American Valley, that nearly all the fluming companies had failed. Contrary to every expectation, on arriving at the bed-rock no gold made its appearance. But a short history of the rise, progress, and final fate of one of these associations, given me in writing by its own secretary, conveys a pretty correct idea of the result of the majority of the remainder.
"The thirteen men, of which the American Fluming Company consisted, commenced getting out timber in February. On the 5th of July they began to lay the flume. A thousand dollars were paid for lumber which they were compelled to buy. They built a dam six feet high and three hundred feet in length, upon which thirty men labored nine days and a half. The cost of said dam was estimated at two thousand dollars. This company left off working on the twenty-fourth day of September, having taken out, in all, gold-dust to the amount of forty-one dollars and seventy cents! Their lumber and tools, sold at auction, brought about two hundred dollars."

A very small amount of arithmetical knowledge will enable one to figure up what the American Fluming Company made by their summer's work. This result was by no means a singular one. Nearly every person on the river received the same stepmother's treatment from Dame Nature in this her mountain workshop.
Of course the whole world (our world) was, to use a phrase much in vogue here, "dead broke." The shopkeepers, restaurants, and gambling-houses, with an amiable confidingness peculiar to such people, had trusted the miners to that degree that they themselves were in the same moneyless condition. Such a batch of woeful faces was never seen before, not the least elongated of which was F.'s, to whom nearly all the companies owed large sums.
Of course with the failure of the golden harvest Othello's occupation was gone. The mass of the unfortunates laid down the shovel and the hoe, and left the river in crowds. It is said that there are not twenty men remaining on Indian Bar, although two months ago you could count them up by hundreds.

Mikejts
01-02-2009, 07:21 AM
I know some of you are always looking for good reference books to help in your search for Ghost towns. I recently worked with a couple of very nice ladies that took upon the task of updating and publishing some materials that were out of print. They bought the inventory of John Aldrich and are in the process of publishing all of his books and maps that are out of print. For those of you that are not aware John K. Aldrich did much research on the state of Colorado and then in the early 1980’s he published a series of books covering the state. A total of 15 books and a topo map for each one. Go to the web site and take a look. http://columbineink.com/ For all of you interested in Ghost Towns and especially Colorado Ghost towns these are must get books.
I have spoken to John on several occasions and I have used his books for reference for 20 years. He did a great job. To see the books come back to print is a great thing. Mine are getting pretty tattered.

David A. Wright
01-02-2009, 07:33 PM
Nell Murbarger is considered by many as the creator of "Ghost Towning". Her pictures and stories got a lot of people interested in going to these places, as well as motivating many to help preserve them. Anything you can find by her is worth the effort IMO.
Ghosts of Glory Trail Murbarger, Nell 1956 Ghost Towns - Nevada/California/Utah
Sovereigns of the Sage Murbarger, Nell 1958 Ghost Towns - Nevada/California/Utah

About eight years ago I was in Dawson's Books in Portland, Oregon and found a hardbound first edition of the Ghosts of the Glory Trail, complete with a page long, hand written note by Murbarger to the first owner of the book. I paid $5. I've had a paperback version of the book since the 1980s and have read it several times over.

Dogman
01-18-2009, 03:57 PM
I was at the local Borders today and saw a book titled "This was mining in the west" by David pearson

http://www.amazon.com/This-Was-Mining-David-Pearson/dp/0887409334/ref=wl_it_dp?ie=UTF8&coliid=IJQORSBRLPF76&colid=2N62MYKN3RPBV

Unfortunately I had already picked up two other books "When Silver was King" By jack San Felice about the Silver king Mine in Arizona and "Ghost Towns and Historical Haunts in Arizona" by Thelma Heatwole (rather dated and it's hard to tell when it was written but it's an interesting read, kind of a personal travelogue)

I didn't have any money to spare but I plan on "This was mining" for my next purchase. It's packed full of photos both B&W and a few color and it covers what mining was like, clothes, tools, etc.

Mikejts
02-24-2009, 02:31 PM
Loyal visitors to the site,

I know some of you are always looking for good reference books to help in your search for Colorado Ghost towns. I recently worked with a couple of very nice ladies that took upon the task of updating and publishing some materials that were out of print. They bought the inventory of John Aldrich and are in the process of publishing all of his books and maps. For those of you that are not aware John K. Aldrich did much research on the state of Colorado and then in the early 1980’s he published a series of books covering the state. A total of 15 books and a topo map for each one. I have spoken to John on several occasions and I have used his books for reference for 20 years. He did a great job. To see the books come back to print is a great thing. Mine are getting pretty tattered. For all of you interested in Ghost Towns and especially Colorado Ghost towns these are must get books.

Make sure to use the code “FAIRPLAY” to get your discount as a visitor from the Rocky Mountain Profiles web site. Go to their web site and take a look. http://columbineink.com/ (http://columbineink.com/) and to place your order.

Norman Johnson
02-24-2009, 03:16 PM
I just finished reading Salt Desert Trails by Charles Kelly. It is a re-publish of his 1930 book on the emmigrant trains that crossed the Great Salt desert southwest of the Great Salt Lake, Utah. He has quotes (some extensive) from a number of journals and letters written by the people who took the "Hastings Cutoff" in the late 1840's and early 1850's including the Donner party. It is a good read and can be found at ABE Books.

For the California people, The White Heart of the Mojave, Edna Brush Perkin's 1922 book on her trip to Death Valley is excellent. Also These Canyons are Full of Ghosts, by Emmett C. Harder is a great story of the Manley Peak-- Butte valley region during the early 60's including his brush with the Manson family and Charley. Cerro Gordo fans can learn all about that ghost town by reading From this Mountain---Cerro Gordo, by Robert C. Likes and Glenn R. Day.

The Murbarger books are really good and they have many refrences to other books and literature that one can then track down and read.

NJ

Mustang John
03-11-2009, 04:50 PM
I know some of you are always looking for good reference books to help in your search for Ghost towns. I recently worked with a couple of very nice ladies that took upon the task of updating and publishing some materials that were out of print. They bought the inventory of John Aldrich and are in the process of publishing all of his books and maps that are out of print. For those of you that are not aware John K. Aldrich did much research on the state of Colorado and then in the early 1980’s he published a series of books covering the state. A total of 15 books and a topo map for each one. Go to the web site and take a look. http://columbineink.com/ For all of you interested in Ghost Towns and especially Colorado Ghost towns these are must get books.
I have spoken to John on several occasions and I have used his books for reference for 20 years. He did a great job. To see the books come back to print is a great thing. Mine are getting pretty tattered.



Thank you for this information. I ordered some of these books and enjoy the information and photos in them.

I have been gathering any information I can locate about Spencer, CO. My grandmother was born there in 1897 and lived in other Colorado mining camps. She met and married my grandfather in Goldroad, AZ in 1916.

Thanks again, Rocky!

Sunrise
09-01-2009, 06:21 PM
My grandmother met my grandfather in Colorado, prior to settling here in Bisbee, Az. He was a miner and they spent their first couple years together in a tent up in the mountains above Telluride. It was a red-bannered day when they were able to get a stove up their by mules!

silverstate55
09-08-2009, 07:22 PM
Hmmmm....I was looking through my library the other day & came across this find (I didn't even realize that I had it):

http://www.silverstate55.com/images/misc/Book_NB_01a.jpg


http://www.silverstate55.com/images/misc/Book_NB_01.jpg

I'll be darned! It's in great shape too!

:)

Vulture
09-10-2009, 02:57 PM
Hmmmm....I was looking through my library the other day & came across this find (I didn't even realize that I had it):

http://www.silverstate55.com/images/misc/Book_NB_01a.jpg


http://www.silverstate55.com/images/misc/Book_NB_01.jpg

I'll be darned! It's in great shape too!

:)

Yes we all love Nell. That is a good one, a companion to "Ghosts of the adobe walls" specific to AZ. She was touring the west by car, camping out at these remote places accompanied by her semi invalid mother. Way to go!

<

Mikejts
09-11-2009, 03:31 PM
My grandmother met my grandfather in Colorado, prior to settling here in Bisbee, Az. He was a miner and they spent their first couple years together in a tent up in the mountains above Telluride. It was a red-bannered day when they were able to get a stove up their by mules!

Where above Telluride.. Can you remember the name of the town? Was it Alta?

dwinslow
09-11-2009, 05:43 PM
Where above Telluride.. Can you remember the name of the town? Was it Alta?

Sounds like maybe up the Black Bear Road if it was above Telluride. Maybe Tomboy.

GaryB
10-17-2009, 11:09 PM
http://forums.ghosttowns.com/showthread.php?t=17624

ghost_town_huntress
11-05-2009, 12:25 AM
I'm looking at the photos of that book there and wondering if I got something good at this bookstore's going out of business sale the last day we were in California. It was the store's last day and all books were $1.00. I spent $14 and picked up some great books, including some ghost town books, a book of old letters from the 1880's, a book of old Western Oral Recitations and traditions (it's actually pretty funny, most oral recitations were back then, but some were sad too) and some other great vintage books. I'll have to take some pictures and post them.

Mikejts
11-20-2009, 07:02 PM
Just in time for Christmas. Release of several new books
1. My Personal favorite - "A Fair Distance" or "Lois Boblett's Western Memoir, 1844-1922." Available with a discount at http://columbineink.com/ (http://columbineink.com/) Make sure to use the code “FAIRPLAY” to get your discount as a visitor from the Rocky Mountain Profiles web site. Also check out their new Ghost town books and calendar for 2010.
· What is so special ? Not only do you get a look at some real pioneers but the book ties in historical events and how those events influenced these pioneers.
2. A new release from Kenneth Jessen – “Ghost Towns: Eastern Colorado” available through all major bookstores and online with delivery expected on November 10.
3. A complete life of Soapy Smith by his great Grandson –Jefferson Randolph Smith II - buy it here - http://www.soapysmith.net/id50.html (http://www.soapysmith.net/id50.html)

Sunrise
11-20-2009, 09:19 PM
Where above Telluride.. Can you remember the name of the town? Was it Alta?
I just came across your question.
I do not know where they lived and only found out about it at her funeral many years ago. Wish I knew.

Norman Johnson
11-22-2009, 04:07 PM
I still haven't finished Up and Down California. But I am going to. I'm on page 400 and can't seem to get time.

This hasn't stopped me from buying and starting other great western non-fictions. This past weekend, I camped down in Clark Valley in Anza Borrego State Park and did the run in to town to the Natrure Book Store which is really almost more of a history bookstore.

I bought Reminiscences of a Ranger by Horace Bell. Bell was a Los Angeles Ranger in 1853. He was one of the earliest law enforcement agents in California. Later he started and edited a newspaper, The Porcupine.

I also bought The Butterfield Overland Mail by Waterman Ormsby. He was the first "Through" passenger on the route and this is his account.

And then finally, I bought Old Time Cattlemen and Other Pioneers of the Anza Borrego Area by Lester Reed. This is another first hand account of the people who settled the Borrego Valley and the area surrounding it.

NJ

LauraA
12-14-2009, 02:13 AM
For those of you who haven't seen this site before, it's got loads of interesting information on the southwest... even some tales of lost treasure.


theGeoZone Home Page (http://www.thegeozone.com/index.jsp)

teds280z
12-14-2009, 08:37 AM
:eek: Looked @ myself in the mirror!!!Good morning everyone. I just finished a good book that has to do wit an owner of the Goldfield Hotel in the '70s, Shirley Porter. the name of the book is But You Can't Leave Shirley.

teds280z
12-01-2011, 09:41 AM
I know this is an old post but for Nevada GTs look up Nevada publications owned by Stanley Paher. He has alot of interesting reading about Nevadas GTS

Mikejts
12-01-2011, 10:33 AM
If you are interested in Colorado try these books from Kenneth Jessen. Just in time for a Christmas gift or next year’s ghost town hunting season. The best Colorado Ghost town Books you can buy – and at a discount. October 2011 - This is a link to the recent announcement of the book, ' Colorado's Best Ghost Towns'. I was fortunate enough to help develop and supply photos. I expect each of you to buy a copy and admire some of my photos and help promote the book. (I do not get anything for sales). http://www.reporterherald.com/lifestyles/neighbors/ci_19065518 Or Available with a discount at http://columbineink.com/ Look under the tab for Affiliate Authors. Use use the promo code “FAIRPLAY” to get your discount as a visitor from the Rocky Mountain Profiles web site. That discount code is good for ANY books you buy on their site.

teds280z
12-01-2011, 11:02 AM
How are you Mike. Theres a thread in the Other forum for us Old Timers IF you would like to post anything.

Mikejts
12-02-2011, 06:04 AM
How are you Mike. Theres a thread in the Other forum for us Old Timers IF you would like to post anything.

I am doing well. Just thinking about updating my site. I spent part of my summer helping with the reconstruction of Fort Lupton, an old fur trading post from the early 1800's. Grand opening was a few weeks ago. I plan to add photos for all to see. Pretty impressive what a bunch of volunteers managed to accomplish. They still need furnishing for the fort so if anyone is interested here is a list of items they are looking to acquire. http://www.spvhs.org/flers/FortNeeds.jpg You can see the fort here. http://www.spvhs.org/index.html Well worth a visit if you are anywhere near.

Where is this other thread???