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grs345
10-07-2008, 01:02 PM
Hi! I was wondering if there are any agencies out to protect and preserve ghost towns that I could get in contact with?

Cause Their is a ghost town in Fairfield County, Connecticut that lies on the border of and is owned by 2 towns and it is a modern ghost town abandonned in 1999 i belive.

The 2 towns are selling a very large area of swamp land that the ghost town lies in to a national wildlife/enviormental agency which I think is fantastic other than the fact that they will tear down the ghost town.

And this ghost town is one of connecticuts largest and most preserved ghost towns.

The ghost town is pleasure beach ( http://www.ghosttowns.com/states/ct/pleasurebeach.html ) and I would just hate to see it torn down.

Thanks!
-grs = go red sox

campp
10-07-2008, 02:38 PM
Good luck.

Most gov't agencies, at least here in the west, are actively destroying GT's.

Local historical groups might be your best bet. There is another thread on your town if you search.

Tsarevna
10-07-2008, 07:16 PM
Those are some impressive pics on the slideshows! Much like a time capsule, even old styrofoam cartons of eggs sitting on the counter top of the kitchen next to a coffee cup...

Even though the 1990's isn't far enough away from our memory for this to be considered an "important" ghost town, it will be eventually. Right now there are millions of kids and infants already living who will never know the 90's. That keeps it in perspective.

I can't beleive a town went ghost just because nobody repaired a bridge. Inconceivable. That really says something about the state of our horrible economy and rotting infrastructure. When a bridge burns and nobody can do anything about it to save a community, what does that say about our supposed strength of our country?


One thing I should point out are some sad truths.

-The government hates ghost towns.

This one is a good example, they let this whole community die rather than pony up money for a bridge, it seems. This goes for state and federal.

-The Forest Service hates ghost towns. (Tore down the town of Caribou, California.)

-Environmentalist groups hate ghost towns. (Tore down Bridal Veil, Oregon, to try and "return it to the forest.")

-Reactionary, over-protective parents hate ghost towns, (the ones that need all public land to be groomed and made "safe" for their foolish children to drive all-terrain vehicles like madmen all over the place. They are urging the closure of old mining ghost towns in the west.)

-Developers hate ghost towns.

(LNG pipeline developers want to destroy the site of Bradwood, Oregon, to store and ship natural gas.) They also want to destroy any old historical building to make a buck off of condos.

Now, I need to make a distinction about the Forest Service. They will save a ghost town from things like Forest Fires, but on conditions. First, the Lucky S Mining town was saved, but this is likely because it was still owned privately, and they do try and save private property buildings from fire. Also, if something is designated as a historical monument and is run by the parks service or forest service, it will be saved too. But, if a ghost town is on Forest Service land, and it's owned by the public with nobody to defend it legally from destruction, destroy_it_they_will.


The only thing you can do is get loud about it, make sure the press covers the story of the forgotten community, make a website designed to inform people about it, and rally people to save it from a city-hall town meeting level to a national outcry, write-your-senator level. Historical groups can help you, but the government will be your enemy.

xplor'npaul
10-08-2008, 02:50 PM
Better watch it tsarevna......if the Gov't reads this site.... they'll prob investigate you! Gawd, save a ghosttown so people can enjoy it? you heathen subversive!! :eek:

grs345
10-09-2008, 03:33 PM
Those are some impressive pics on the slideshows! Much like a time capsule, even old styrofoam cartons of eggs sitting on the counter top of the kitchen next to a coffee cup...

Even though the 1990's isn't far enough away from our memory for this to be considered an "important" ghost town, it will be eventually. Right now there are millions of kids and infants already living who will never know the 90's. That keeps it in perspective.

I can't beleive a town went ghost just because nobody repaired a bridge. Inconceivable. That really says something about the state of our horrible economy and rotting infrastructure. When a bridge burns and nobody can do anything about it to save a community, what does that say about our supposed strength of our country?


One thing I should point out are some sad truths.

-The government hates ghost towns.

This one is a good example, they let this whole community die rather than pony up money for a bridge, it seems. This goes for state and federal.

-The Forest Service hates ghost towns. (Tore down the town of Caribou, California.)

-Environmentalist groups hate ghost towns. (Tore down Bridal Veil, Oregon, to try and "return it to the forest.")

-Reactionary, over-protective parents hate ghost towns, (the ones that need all public land to be groomed and made "safe" for their foolish children to drive all-terrain vehicles like madmen all over the place. They are urging the closure of old mining ghost towns in the west.)

-Developers hate ghost towns.

(LNG pipeline developers want to destroy the site of Bradwood, Oregon, to store and ship natural gas.) They also want to destroy any old historical building to make a buck off of condos.

Now, I need to make a distinction about the Forest Service. They will save a ghost town from things like Forest Fires, but on conditions. First, the Lucky S Mining town was saved, but this is likely because it was still owned privately, and they do try and save private property buildings from fire. Also, if something is designated as a historical monument and is run by the parks service or forest service, it will be saved too. But, if a ghost town is on Forest Service land, and it's owned by the public with nobody to defend it legally from destruction, destroy_it_they_will.


The only thing you can do is get loud about it, make sure the press covers the story of the forgotten community, make a website designed to inform people about it, and rally people to save it from a city-hall town meeting level to a national outcry, write-your-senator level. Historical groups can help you, but the government will be your enemy.
great idea!

I already have a small informative 2-paged informative site ( http://bfsnakes.googlepages.com/pleasurebeach.html )

but i should probly make a larger site.

Thanks for the idea! I think Im gonna do that!

Tommyknocker
10-09-2008, 04:48 PM
Reminds me very much of a ghost town here in Colorado called "Gillman". It too was shut down not too long ago in 1984. Lots of great old buildings and mine ruins some dating back to the 1880's. Good luck getting it preserved. I would suggest that you write your congressman, senators and get LOTS of people involved!
Good Luck!:rolleyes:

xplor'npaul
10-10-2008, 08:56 AM
:cool: Here is California, the state is almost broke.... I thought that was a bad thing... maybe it's a good thing and they wont have enough dollars to send out the bulldozers to the nearest ghosttown! I'm just kidding of course, but part of me hopes so.:rolleyes:

grs345
10-14-2008, 07:00 PM
lol.

But what could I say the advantages of protecting this ghost town would be? and Im noly 15 so would anybody take me me serriosly or probly not?

Tsarevna
10-15-2008, 08:01 AM
lol.

But what could I say the advantages of protecting this ghost town would be? and Im noly 15 so would anybody take me me serriosly or probly not?


That's an excellent reason right there!

(And here's the come-back if someone gives you **** about your age.)

How is the younger generation (and generations to come) supposed to understand the past if most of it is erased? :cool:

Younger folks will take for granted everything that the elder generations have given them, if they can't understand how difficult life was in the past. This is the age of Photoshop and computer graphics. Nothing in print, or in a film, seems credible.

Tangible places, and artifacts, are the only way to prove the past was real.

............

Just be eloquent, polite, passionate, and never show frustration or anger about the slow pace of getting things done. Keep at it!

edit: O yeah, and money talks! Get some statistics about the income that ghost towns pool for small mountain communities, how much their museums make per year etc etc, and then you'll get a more captivated audience.

David A. Wright
10-15-2008, 10:52 AM
The government has a law on the books, called the Antiquities Act of 1905. It's very purpose is to preserve our heritage and history. The law protects items found on public lands (not in private collections) that are over a certain age (80 years?).

The law was in effect during the metal detecting age of the 1950s-1970s when people scoured ghost towns and other areas looking for bottles, coins and Indian artifacts. However it became one of those forgotten laws that lacked enforcement.

In the 1980s and 1990s, the law was dusted off and enforced again, especially in regards to Native American sites and relics. It also preserved ghost towns during the heavy mining activity going on in the western US. That is why you find now abandoned strip mines going right up to but not including buildings, cemeteries and other spots where mines were in or very near ghost towns.

The Antiquities Act is also why you see archeologists working along the sides of roads and highways that are scheduled for widening or major rehabilitation. They are especially looking for Native American evidence and / or historical evidence that might impact the project.

Due to the heavy liability craze in recent times, it is likely that the government will "rehabilitate" historic areas. However, with the recent budget crisis, the Iraqi war and other financial issues, this might be put on the back burner. However, in Death Valley National Park, there is one historic site - once a popular locale with parking and informative and interpretive signage - now closed to the public; and many, many acres above the millsite (full of mines and other ruins) are now closed along with it for several miles to the summit of the range.

As mentioned, the US government has had an active part in destroying historic sites. Death Valley in the past, due to a former superintendent whose philosophy was that DVNP should only showcase natural history, went on a campaign to destroy many ghost towns and succeeded partially. Ignorance of the Antiquities Law was probably behind his being allowed to do so.

I frequent many ghost towns in my local and have done so for decades. When I find something that might be fodder for the souvenier collectors I mark is location with GPS, take plenty of photos, hide it well (in plain sight if possible), then go to the local museum to let them know of it. I have a working relationship with several museums. Then I leave it up to them to do what they think is best. And when back in the area, I follow-up on my finding.

A few years ago I found recent, systematic and widespread digging at the ghost town of San Carlos, California. It was obvious that the digging attempted to duplicate an archeological dig, but appeared too ameturish as well as destructive. I have accompanied BLM on a dig in the past and observed over several days their standard methodology. Archeologists are painstakingly careful, don't destroy and generally restore the land's appearance to what they found before they dug. What I found at San Carlos was shoddy, leaving building stones strewn all over the place, with much disturbed earthwork. I took plenty of photos, went to the Eastern California Museum at Indepedence and the curator downloaded my camera into his computer, contacted the appropriate agencies (BLM and the City of Los Angeles Department of Water & Power, as well as Inyo County Sheriff's Department). He also first checked to see if there was any archeological studies done and found there were none. It wasn't investigated to the nth degree, and there was really no way to determine who did it, so it basically turned into a cold case.

As mentioned, talk to museums, land owners (including government) and research historical societies. If there are none, interact with those interested in forming one and see how to go about creating one.

If this sounds out of your field of your capabilities, then I'd suggest taking as many photos as possible and wait and see what the future holds. By then your circumstance might have changed enough that your work now might make a difference later. You might also study the site on your own (if you are not violating tresspassing laws) - map it out, even if it's only a rough sketch. If you are proficient with a GPS, use it to mark building sites. Note buildings, streets, sidewalks, parks, public buildings, buisness locations, and the like. What you note now might serve well later. And it will go a long way to help you feel better about your deeds and something to pass along to others later.

Tsarevna
10-27-2008, 12:06 AM
Better watch it tsarevna......if the Gov't reads this site.... they'll prob investigate you! Gawd, save a ghosttown so people can enjoy it? you heathen subversive!! :eek:

Yikes! That makes me a communist, doesn't it!? :o

WadeVC
12-17-2009, 09:56 PM
Hereagain, this may be an old thread, but a good topic is a good topic and deserves a response.

It really is sad how much of out past is being bulldozed under and eradicated.

Per capita, the US has less reminders (buildings/dwellings) of its past than anywhere else in the world, which is really sad considering the realtively young age of this country. Our bumbling government is both clueless and could care less...they will even sell these sites to the highest bidder.

Corporate greed and narccissim will ensure that the remaining bits of our history will be sold or purchased for the land value, plowed under, and replaced with a bright, shiny office building or parking lot.

I wish I had an answer as to how to save our history, but I do not; and those in a position to do so have no intentions of doing it. :(