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View Full Version : Ghost Town Mapping Website(please sticky)



grs345
11-23-2008, 03:20 PM
So I made this website dedicated to mapping the location of ghost towns:

www.ghosttowns.co.nr (http://www.ghosttowns.co.nr/)

It's still under construction but I think all of you would like it. Right now from our site their are only satellite view maps available but I am currently working on incorporating terrain maps and road maps on the site.

check it out!

oh and zoom in on the ghost town and for most it will show a bordered outline of the town. you can also access this forum from the site.

230
11-23-2008, 10:09 PM
That looks real good.It looks like a lot of work.I have several in my area here as well that are not on your map and i havent seen much mention on here about them.Would you like some info and coordinates?

grs345
11-24-2008, 01:40 PM
shure definatly!

also I should have the how to map a ghost town section up within afew days which will show all of you how to add a map to our maps instantly.

teds280z
11-24-2008, 03:50 PM
We have found that we in general do not like to point out directly where GT's are. THis can help thread out some of the "people" that like to deface our history. I know we have had a couple threads on this, just can't remember which ones. Its just like posting to many pictures on the site, do that and no reason for us adventurest to go out.

By the way welcome to this site.:)

teds280z
11-24-2008, 03:56 PM
I do like what you have done. Looks good. What I was saying was just don't make it to easy. Half the fun is also research into history and things.:cool:

vacant minds
11-24-2008, 04:39 PM
We have found that we in general do not like to point out directly where GT's are. THis can help thread out some of the "people" that like to deface our history. I know we have had a couple threads on this, just can't remember which ones. Its just like posting to many pictures on the site, do that and no reason for us adventurest to go out.



I am new to GT'ing and I couldnt agree more. Are you going to tell a robber where you keep all your valuables? Sure they know they are in the house but not the exact location.

I enjoy searching for hours on the interweb and in books and maps (my girlfriend thinks im crazy).

I do disagree one one thing though.. I like all the pictures.

mainmanwalkin
11-24-2008, 07:11 PM
Hey, that's amazing that you were able to spot the Andytown writing on US27--how did you ever find out about that?

mainmanwalkin
11-24-2008, 07:30 PM
I do disagree one one thing though.. I like all the pictures.

I agree, pictures are pretty helpful if you're planning a day or weekend trip (or longer). They can give you a gauge of how much time needs to be set aside for certain towns and how to plan the day out. For instance in Florida a lone building foundation (Citrus Center) vs a large partially intact site (Rochelle) can make a big difference timewise.

I can see the point in not loading in 20 or 30 shots, though, as it might take away some of the mystery for future visitors. But I always hunt around anyway to see if there's anything undiscovered around.

And I really like seeing all of the old archival shots from the town's heyday too.

teds280z
11-25-2008, 12:33 PM
I agree I love the pictures and even though you see it in pics nothing better than the real thing. 50 years and many millions of $ and maybe able to see all the GT's. Think about the mystery of what else is there. :)

vacant minds
11-25-2008, 06:04 PM
I agree I love the pictures and even though you see it in pics nothing better than the real thing. 50 years and many millions of $ and maybe able to see all the GT's. Think about the mystery of what else is there. :)

The way I see it.. Pictures are like gold, the more pictues I see the hotter the gold fever gets.

Tsarevna
12-01-2008, 02:02 AM
I am new to GT'ing and I couldnt agree more. Are you going to tell a robber where you keep all your valuables? Sure they know they are in the house but not the exact location.


I must respectfully disagree. Ghost Towns are not like household valuables at all.

Take jewelry for instance. In your house it has no potential to be destroyed by the Federal Government, developers, the BLM, the Forest Service, or any other agency concerned about 'liability' or upkeep costs.

Ghost Towns are treasures of our past, they, for the most part, belong to the public.
Nobody wakes up in the morning thinking "Hmmm....I'm going to go steal a historic tombstone today. Think I'll go check on the Internet to see where I can find one."

Vandalism is 99% perpetrated by locals. It's not something people want to admit to, but it's their own nasty neighbors doing the damage. Often times it's youth having a party at the well-known "old cemetary" nearby, and in drunkeness, with the aim of impressing friends they vandalize and steal. Other times it's the local druggies stealing urns, doorknobs, pipe fixtures and wire to pay for meth.

I think it's a shame how people get badgered that post an exact location of a ghost town. Why doesn't anyone ever mention the countless Ghost Town books published, written for profit, as driving guides? :confused: Why aren't authors getting heat?

It's the age of Internet blogs, satellite imagery on-demand, GPS machines, geocaching and Google Earth.

Hinting is giving an exact location, because it doesn't take 5 seconds for somebody to google it up and find it.

The real danger to ghost towns is having people ignorant of them until it's too late to save them. How can you petition the Forest Service and get your local Senator or Representative to help preserve a site when you don't even know it exists? More of them are being torn down every year.

Bridal Veil, Oregon, was torn down due to ignorance about it, so was Caribou, California. The clock is ticking for the rest, so let people know loudly and proudly where they can go to see our vanishing history, I say.

teds280z
12-01-2008, 08:39 AM
I guess your right. Even when I research the whole trip and remember the GPS and Maps, you can still get lost going to the sites by making that left instead of right and when you turn around, oops, another wrong turn. To me thats part of the fun of it.

The first time I went to see Tunnel Camp, Mazuma(?), and Seven Troughs outside of Lovelock, NV I did make a wrong turn. I went over the mountain range there and when I came down the other side into a huge valley, I found a small oasis there. There were 2 Cabins(from the '20s-'30s) and old of dump truck and lotsa trees with a ice-cold spring.

At least there was very little vandalism, just several thousand bullet holes and maybe a few cans of spraypaint.

I really don't want anyone to think I am getting on their case about posting locations, for this I am Sorry.

I really doubt the people who destroy our lands and historic places even know what a map is.

Take care and Happy Holidays to All
Ted Christianson:)

bad bob
12-01-2008, 10:59 AM
I must respectfully disagree. Ghost Towns are not like household valuables at all.

Take jewelry for instance. In your house it has no potential to be destroyed by the Federal Government, developers, the BLM, the Forest Service, or any other agency concerned about 'liability' or upkeep costs.

Ghost Towns are treasures of our past, they, for the most part, belong to the public.
Nobody wakes up in the morning thinking "Hmmm....I'm going to go steal a historic tombstone today. Think I'll go check on the Internet to see where I can find one."

Vandalism is 99% perpetrated by locals. It's not something people want to admit to, but it's their own nasty neighbors doing the damage. Often times it's youth having a party at the well-known "old cemetary" nearby, and in drunkeness, with the aim of impressing friends they vandalize and steal. Other times it's the local druggies stealing urns, doorknobs, pipe fixtures and wire to pay for meth.

I think it's a shame how people get badgered that post an exact location of a ghost town. Why doesn't anyone ever mention the countless Ghost Town books published, written for profit, as driving guides? :confused: Why aren't authors getting heat?

It's the age of Internet blogs, satellite imagery on-demand, GPS machines, geocaching and Google Earth.

Hinting is giving an exact location, because it doesn't take 5 seconds for somebody to google it up and find it.

The real danger to ghost towns is having people ignorant of them until it's too late to save them. How can you petition the Forest Service and get your local Senator or Representative to help preserve a site when you don't even know it exists? More of them are being torn down every year.

Bridal Veil, Oregon, was torn down due to ignorance about it, so was Caribou, California. The clock is ticking for the rest, so let people know loudly and proudly where they can go to see our vanishing history, I say.




Well put Tsar, except for a couple of mistakes, as I see it:
1st) Many of the ghost town books were written decades ago, b4 vandalism became a real issue.

2nd) Many problem "kids" of today and the last few years are very computer savvy and know how to search for so-called fun spots, or remote locations. They can then go there and do whatever they want. And with or without alcohol and other mind-altering drugs are free to rampage, loot and/or destroy wherever they happen to be.

Ghost towns can be "saved" with vigilance, group "grass root" efforts and petitioning of elected officials responsible. Many of these officials are not even aware of developer plans or other GT destruction plans until it's too late. Other elected officials are aware but side with the developers. Historic Preservation Societies, and other Orgs can be helpful in saving our vanishing GTs. Sometimes having a GT listed as an historic site is the only avenue remaining.

mainmanwalkin
12-02-2008, 12:17 PM
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2285/2280721554_6278b9d3a6.jpg
Many problem "kids" of today and the last few years are very computer savvy and know how to search for so-called fun spots, or remote locations. They can then go there and do whatever they want. And with or without alcohol and other mind-altering drugs are free to rampage, loot and/or destroy wherever they happen to be.


This is unfortunate but really seems to be true. For instance, no one lives near the abandoned prison at Deep Lake, yet when I visited I found it was full of graffitti and paintball splatters.

I've listed many Florida ghost towns, and the only time I put exact locations are when the site is a state or county park. Otherwise I stick with being generally "close enough".

vacant minds
12-02-2008, 07:48 PM
I must respectfully disagree. Ghost Towns are not like household valuables at all.

Take jewelry for instance. In your house it has no potential to be destroyed by the Federal Government, developers, the BLM, the Forest Service, or any other agency concerned about 'liability' or upkeep costs. Apples and oranges- Jelwery has the potential to be stolen by theives. If you give an exact location to a thief he's going to rob you whether you want him to or not.

Ghost Towns are treasures of our past, they, for the most part, belong to the public.
Nobody wakes up in the morning thinking "Hmmm....I'm going to go steal a historic tombstone today. Think I'll go check on the Internet to see where I can find one." I agree about them being treasures and they belong to everyone. I do however disagree with they do not plan. Example: Beveridge and Piano story.

Vandalism is 99% perpetrated by locals. It's not something people want to admit to, but it's their own nasty neighbors doing the damage. Often times it's youth having a party at the well-known "old cemetary" nearby, and in drunkeness, with the aim of impressing friends they vandalize and steal. Other times it's the local druggies stealing urns, doorknobs, pipe fixtures and wire to pay for meth. This I have no clue about so I will take your word for it.

I think it's a shame how people get badgered that post an exact location of a ghost town. Why doesn't anyone ever mention the countless Ghost Town books published, written for profit, as driving guides? :confused: Why aren't authors getting heat? They should and if there was a forum that they all read I would be right there *****ing up a storm.

It's the age of Internet blogs, satellite imagery on-demand, GPS machines, geocaching and Google Earth.

Hinting is giving an exact location, because it doesn't take 5 seconds for somebody to google it up and find it. Most kids these days wont take the time out of their busy lives to look something up. If you dont give exact locations or details they will move on. Attention spans of a gnat.

The real danger to ghost towns is having people ignorant of them until it's too late to save them. How can you petition the Forest Service and get your local Senator or Representative to help preserve a site when you don't even know it exists? More of them are being torn down every year. Most might think that this is a fight they cant win. Letters do make a difference.


Bridal Veil, Oregon, was torn down due to ignorance about it, so was Caribou, California. The clock is ticking for the rest, so let people know loudly and proudly where they can go to see our vanishing history, I say. As much as I hate to say it, people these days dont care. If its not within arms reach they could care less. There is only a select few that really care about this part of our history. This is clearly evident by the traffic this site gets. How more in your face can you get ghosttowns.com?



Dont get me wrong, Im not trying to start an argument. These are purely my opinions.

vacant minds
12-02-2008, 07:51 PM
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2285/2280721554_6278b9d3a6.jpg

This is unfortunate but really seems to be true. For instance, no one lives near the abandoned prison at Deep Lake, yet when I visited I found it was full of graffitti and paintball splatters.

I've listed many Florida ghost towns, and the only time I put exact locations are when the site is a state or county park. Otherwise I stick with being generally "close enough".


I cant imagine this was done by teens. This screams skinheads or white supremacists (which I guess could be teens).

GaryB
12-03-2008, 08:34 AM
Vandalism is 99% perpetrated by locals. It's not something people want to admit to, but it's their own nasty neighbors doing the damage. Often times it's youth having a party at the well-known "old cemetery" nearby, and in drunkeness, with the aim of impressing friends they vandalize and steal. Other times it's the local druggies stealing urns, doorknobs, pipe fixtures and wire to pay for meth.



I have to disagree. Where my up bringing comes from (and it's not really from Vegas), we protect our history. True, there may be one or two "natives" that break the pattern, or the occasional drunken party; but for the most part, we keep an eye out for the jerk wads doing the damage. I'd say the majority of the vandalism is someone who is not from the area. Seriously, why would they care? It's not theirs to honor, just theirs to take.

I've seen grave markers stripped of precious stones. Buildings torn down for their "old" wood. Machinery stripped of wiring for the copper to sell. Bullet holes in everything you could imagine. Etc., etc. And I'd dare say 9 out of 10 times the known culprit was not a local.




I think it's a shame how people get badgered that post an exact location of a ghost town. Why doesn't anyone ever mention the countless Ghost Town books published, written for profit, as driving guides? :confused: Why aren't authors getting heat?


I don't think anyone is getting outright badgered, just being reminded of the consequences. And how many people buy a book to find a place to go and randomly vandalize? Anyone using published articles for any form of vandalizing, like treasure hunting is a pro. And likely doesn't need this site or any other to find what they are looking for. They are probably not the worst threat to any historical site, either. I'd say the random act of ignorance or drunken behavior is. And believe it or not, the farther from the big cities you go, the lower that risk gets, and swings toward the former.




For the most part, I feel anyone taking the time to research a site falls into two categories for the most part. Either they love the genre or are a treasure hunter. True, it's hard to tell a person's intent, even face to face much less over the web. And that's why so many feel strongly about how much, if any info of a site is given. And trying to get the G-Men involved works both ways. I have seen many more sites destroyed in the name of protection/progress/reclamation as I have seen actually saved.

So I approach it this way:

If the place is popular/familiar/known enough to be on a map or a website, chances are it gets pretty heavy attention from all sides of the spectrum. So it's been visited by admirers and torn up by treasure hunters. So it's probably not that big a deal about pointing someone in the right direction to find it. But I know a few places that likely less than a thousand people know of, or have ever seen. The sites' overall condition and the artifacts support that idea. And those sites I'll never really tell anyone about unless I really know them well enough to trust their intent. And trust me, I have been on both sides of that fence, and still am today. It's really, really, impossible to get anyone in the rest of my state to believe that someone from Las Vegas actually has good intentions regarding historical sites.

vacant minds
12-03-2008, 08:58 AM
Good points Gary.


Not everyone deserves to know all the secret locations. Its kind of like a drivers license -- Its a privilege not a right.

xplor'npaul
12-03-2008, 09:07 AM
Either ghosttown lover or treasure hunter? 2 catagories , that's all? Well, I am both. and I respectfully disagree. one does not preclude the other.I myself would dig in a privie if found way out in the mojave...... a relic buried 6 ft down, does noone any good....brought to light, and given to an historical society, or if insignificant perhaps like the bottom of a broken bottle, shown to neighbors and friends to educate them about our past is an admirable thing.
While I disrespect those that would knock a large hole in the walll of an abandoned adobe structure to follow a metal detector hit and those that would tresspass, or otherwise break the law, Ghosttowning and treasure hunting can be symbiotic. One has to leave the area exactly as found however. Just my opinion,....many wonderful ghosttowners are treasure hunters.

vacant minds
12-03-2008, 10:26 AM
There is a fine line when taking stuff. I can only imagine a small percentage of people who take things actually give them to a historical society or museum.

Its a catch 22 if you really think about it. If you decide to take something from a site to "preserve our history" you are actually taking away from someone else. If you leave it then its there for the taking by the next person.

Rupe
12-03-2008, 10:40 AM
My opinion for what it's worth is, I like having the direction spelled out to me. I think that people that are doing the damage are people that find these places by just wandering around for the most part. Very few people run around with paint in thier vehicles with the perpose of going out in the middle of no where to vandle something if they are not from the area. Most of the out of area vandles would be those that find these places by accident I would think. Normally I think the harder and farther it is away from people the less likely out of the area people are going to destroy it unless they are those that are out there to steal ie Copper. Then they may do thier homework and find places whether it is posted here or not, they will find it.
I agree with the more people know where these places are the easier it will be to protect them from the State and Fed. government agencies.

Anyway that's my 2 cents. Rupe

PS
Most of the Vandalism that I investigated was by local kids and younger people being drunk and stupid. Except bullet holes, that's by everyone that is just stupid. Being a gun owner and shooter, hunter, I hate finding bullet holes in everything. I don't understand why they can't set up targets like I do. I have never ever shot at something I wasn't suppose to shoot at. Those that do give guys like me a bad name.

xplor'npaul
12-03-2008, 11:02 AM
yeah, your right vacant minds.....but, and I hate to do this....suppose I know where a large amt of gold is buried on blm land....now, do I leave it, or let the gov poss find it, and then destroy whatever GT might be near, in the name of "protecting" the citizens from hurting themselve and thereby avoiding a lawsuit? It is a catch 22,...... treasure hunting is just that, you do it for the treasure, which is lost to history anyway.....it's a complex issure....like the rights to keep land pristine, but allow 4x4's like mine to have access.......

vacant minds
12-03-2008, 11:32 AM
hahaha I agree with you.

Gold is a different story though... Monetary value VS historical artifacts. I can guarantee you that if I found a large amount of gold no one would know where it came from.

vacant minds
12-03-2008, 11:34 AM
Hey Rupe can I come visit you? Im originally from Springfield/Eugene.

Rupe
12-03-2008, 11:50 AM
Hey Rupe can I come visit you? Im originally from Springfield/Eugene.

Sure, where are you now? ( Why did you leave, me here all alone? I search the world over and I thought I found true love, but she met another and blllllp she was gone!):D Oops sorry just reminded me of an old song. I can't wait to get to the other side of the mountains where it's dryer and there is more to explore. This wetness is getting to my bones and my mind (Ref: song up above) rupe

vacant minds
12-03-2008, 12:09 PM
Sure, where are you now? ( Why did you leave, me here all alone? I search the world over and I thought I found true love, but she met another and blllllp she was gone!):D Oops sorry just reminded me of an old song. I can't wait to get to the other side of the mountains where it's dryer and there is more to explore. This wetness is getting to my bones and my mind (Ref: song up above) rupe


Currently live in So Cal. I left back in 97 for a job here. I will be back in March for a convetion in Portland. I plan on heading down for a couple days after.

Rupe
12-03-2008, 12:39 PM
Well I hope you didn't misplace your roots and intend on coming back for good someday. Maybe we can get together and go on a short run up there or at least have a cup of coffee on your way through. rupe

vacant minds
12-03-2008, 05:39 PM
That sounds like fun. I will keep this in mind when I plan how many days Im going to stay after. I have to make a special trip down to Coos Bay to visit the whole famn damily. I haven't been back since 01.

Rupe
12-03-2008, 06:34 PM
Cool, let me know! rupe

GaryB
12-04-2008, 08:20 AM
Either ghosttown lover or treasure hunter? 2 catagories , that's all? Well, I am both. and I respectfully disagree.


BY "hunter" I meant more of the type that search out and likely destroy sites for no other purpose than to gain something of some monetary value, or even worse, for themselves to hoard. Most people who like to scour sites looking for cool relics are not really considered treasure hunters from my experience. Divers have the same issues. There are those that dive wreck sites for the enjoyment, and those that dive them to look for anything they can make a buck off of.

True, there are some ghost towner's that may find something of historical value and they may pass it on to the right people, ie. museum. But others (like myself) leave it be for the next person to find. Granted, the next person may just take it, but I wouldn't want to remove it for 2 reasons. 1, it takes away from the enjoyment of others finding it. And 2, chances are the site is protected by some measure of an antiquities law which makes it illegal.

Good luck on making the BLM Archaeologist or Forest Ranger believe you had the best intentions when they see that ore cart in the back of your truck ;)