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View Full Version : What equipment do you carry on you and/or have in your vehicles?



rev
12-27-2009, 08:28 PM
I'm fairly new to GT's/mine exploration, been doing it about a year or so. I don't own a 4x4 yet and have read the other topic of "What get's you there". But that thread doesn't include What you carry in your vehicle? So I'd like to know what you consider to me most important when out wheeling?


Also I'd like to know what you all are carrying on yourselves to go hiking as well as equipment? I take two flashlights, cell phone, knife, granola, lighter, hat and water. I haven't found a good water container or backpack yet - still looking

I was just curious as to what everyone takes and considers invaluable when out ;)

dwinslow
12-27-2009, 09:22 PM
Water, water and more water. I do have a 4x4 so I have extraction equipment like shovels, tow straps and a winch. I also carry tools, first aid pack, and have 2 way radios (not CB's) and a cell phone. If it's a real rough spot to get to, I usually travel with another 4x4. Also make sure ya have good tires and before ya go, I have the Bronco checked out for mechanical stuff, serviced and have belts checked. My ghost town travels have taken me into some pretty deserted spots so I am little more careful than some. I also let someone know what area I'm going to. I also do research on the area that I'm going to.

GaryB
12-27-2009, 11:13 PM
Depends on if I'm alone (especially one vehicle) or in a group and where I'm going. If alone I plan for the worse and load to the hilt with emergency equipment and spare parts. If in a group, then I skimp on some things like spare parts. But to me the bare minimum would be:

Water. At least 2 gallons for the vehicle (a 50/50 mix works better) and 1 gallon (potable) per person per day, and figure for at least 3 days longer than you're planning on being out. Most vehicles hold 3-4 gallons, but if you have a major leak, you'll have enough to get you back on the road. 1 gallon per person is a bare minimum, especially in a dry hot climate during the summer.

Spare tire, jack and necessary tools to change a flat. It sounds redundant, but be sure the tire is inflated properly and you have the key lock if you have a locking lug nut or hubcap. A can or two of fix a flat can help wonders too, but a plug kit is best. I have both. If you know the area is bad on tires, an extra spare is a good idea. I've killed a few tires in less than a 100 miles in cholla cacti infested areas.

Spare fuel, the more the better, but 5 gallons is likely enough. No matter how close to home you're going, it's always a good idea. I carry at least a 5 gallon and have found a use for it more than half the time out. Usually being a good guy and helping a stranded traveler who thought they had enough going out. Using 4wd burns more fuel than many are used to. Worse case you can use it start a camp fire if stranded and waiting for help, or even to top off if stranded and running the vehicle for warmth.

First aid kit. Only the wazoo high priced ones seem to have enough from the get go, but a decent one from anywhere is better than nothing. I usually compliment one with things that might come in extra handy like snake bite, bug bite, poison oak spray/lotion, etc.

Food for 3 days longer than your planned trip. Canned foods and cereal/granola bars don't take up much room and can be prepped easily to eat. Just be sure to take at least a military style can opener or have pop tops.

Survival kit. You can buy these all over, and many are quite good. With some time, you can build your own. Fire starters, mirror, flashlight, emergency blanket, knife, etc. I went to a survival class where the guy put his kit into a zip lock bag and used a food vacuum bag over it to make sure it was ultimately water proof. Thought that was a good idea.

Duct tape, bailing wire, spare vehicle fluids, quick set epoxy, ratchet strap. I've seen Jeeps with busted leaf springs and shackles duct tapped and bailing wired back together enough to get them home. Some leaks could even be glued, taped and wired to get you home if you got a little spare fluid.

Fire extinguisher rated for a vehicle, road flares. Road flares are handy for various things, and so are fire extinguishers if the flares get out of hand.


Probably more, I forget how much I pack away till I look though it. Those small black and red Rubbermaid totes Wal-Mart sells work great for getting everything into convenient packers. And what Don said about basic maintenance is key. I can't recall the number of times I have seen someone broken down with something as simple as a bald tire or broken worn out fan belt.

campp
12-28-2009, 06:00 AM
All good advise. Let me underline "Tell someone responsible where you are going and when you are coming out." It helps to draw a little map on where you are going so the authorities have a chance of finding you.

JoeZona
12-28-2009, 06:52 AM
Jack, spare tire, and compressor.
Map (on laptop), and gps.
Gun and ammo.
Duct tape, flashlight.
Small tool set, hatchet and lighter.
Plenty of beer and Spam.

Wife.

Darin
12-28-2009, 07:19 AM
The wife (always travel with a buddy), camera, tripod, video recorder, tape or digital recorder, beer, aclimate clothing, knife, first aid kit, CB radio (both AM and SSB), FMRS radios, flares, compass, maps, spare shoes/socks, water, M.R.E.s (I'm a big Burt Gummer fan), tent, camp stove, coffee pot, toilet paper, porta-shower (with solar water bag) some sort of fire starter...just to name a few.

ghost_town_huntress
12-28-2009, 01:08 PM
I've usually taken my little Saturn ghost towning (surprisingly if you really know how to drive, you can get a car a lot of places you wouldn't think a car could go) but my Saturn needs some work done before I can even attempt to take it out again. As for water and a backpack, I got myself a camelback; it doesn't hold much other stuff but it holds enough. I put my Maglight, safety glasses, first aid kit, camera, cell phone, batteries, insulated water bladder and lunch in there and there is still room to put my gun or any relics or rocks that I find in there. I usually carry my rock hammer in the loop on mu overalls but sometimes it likes to fall out so lately I've been looking for a way to attach it to my pack. I usually like to carry my gun in a holster rather than my pack as well. We have a truck that we can take out but it's had so many problems off and on throughout the years that I've ended up having to take the car most times, but it's never failed me (except for the time when I blew a tire out by Newhouse, but that was more my fault for going too fast and my husband's fault for not putting the proper equipment back in the trunk for me to change the flat, LOL). Where are you located? And welcome to ghost towning! It's a lot of great fun!


I'm fairly new to GT's/mine exploration, been doing it about a year or so. I don't own a 4x4 yet and have read the other topic of "What get's you there". But that thread doesn't include What you carry in your vehicle? So I'd like to know what you consider to me most important when out wheeling?


Also I'd like to know what you all are carrying on yourselves to go hiking as well as equipment? I take two flashlights, cell phone, knife, granola, lighter, hat and water. I haven't found a good water container or backpack yet - still looking

I was just curious as to what everyone takes and considers invaluable when out ;)

ghost_town_huntress
12-28-2009, 01:13 PM
I also forgot to mention, don't go into mines unless you're with somebody experienced in the field of mine exploration. I'm a member of the largest mine preservation and exploration group in the country, Mojave Underground. They're based out of Utah and every once in awhile they'll have introductory safety courses at the Ophir Hill Mine in Ophir, Utah. We're planning a conference for similar groups nationwide this coming June in Park City if you're interested in coming. Come check us out at mojaveunderground.com.

rev
12-28-2009, 08:06 PM
I also forgot to mention, don't go into mines unless you're with somebody experienced in the field of mine exploration. I'm a member of the largest mine preservation and exploration group in the country, Mojave Underground. They're based out of Utah and every once in awhile they'll have introductory safety courses at the Ophir Hill Mine in Ophir, Utah. We're planning a conference for similar groups nationwide this coming June in Park City if you're interested in coming. Come check us out at mojaveunderground.com.
I'm in Tucson, Arizona. I don't travel that much and have never been to Utah, but I'll keep it in mind. And I do go into mines, walk in ones anyway. I wouldn't rappel into one, that's far beyond my experience level. If anything looks too steep, smells strange or just looks unsafe I won't go near it. Common sense is what I go by, I know my limitations...

ghost_town_huntress
12-28-2009, 11:11 PM
There are other mine exploration groups around the country, you should try to look one up in your area and see if they're coming to our conference in June.

David A. Wright
12-29-2009, 03:43 PM
What I carry in my truck 24/7: http://www.gbr.4wdtrips.net/4x4/tacoma-carryon.html

JoeZona
12-29-2009, 06:00 PM
Common sense is what I go by, I know my limitations...

Now if only more people knew and understood that concept!

But, like they say, "Common sense isn't so common after all, is it?" Just a bit of common sense goes a long way.

It's like the GPS story of the couple getting lost in the snowstorm. They had the latest technology, but lacked the common sense to use that fabulous technology wisely. They probably didn't even know there was a choice between "shortest" and "fastest" route on the GPS. New school.

On the other hand, they DID have survival supplies with them in the car. Old school.

Seems like there's a bit of disconnect between technology and common sense anymore. New school doesn't seem to carry the common sense like old school does.

Too much blind trust in new school, IMHO.

Norman Johnson
12-29-2009, 06:32 PM
I go out to the wild world to camp so I bring stuff. Here are some lists. However, to hit the basic points, my first aid kit is a mid-range kit with add-ons: Pepto Bismal, Benedryl, Tums, Pepsid AC, Comtrex, Advil, etc. I bring a wire come-a-long and a small Danforth anchor for sand, a plug kit and rattlebox compressor for flats, some hoses for cooling failures, and just plain common sense which means tell people where you are going and stay with the vehicle--for days-- if that is what it takes.

NJ


CAR CAMPING LIST


This is a list of the basics of everything I might take on a trip. It does not have the exotic entertainment items or other specialized devices which are described in other chapters. However, it is very complete in “the basics” and beyond basics. Pick and chose. You know what your vehicle is capable of carrying, and where you are going, what the road is like, and what the season or weather conditions may be. Many of these items are exactly what is listed in the backpack list. So why not just throw your backpack in the vehicle? I did that for many years, until I stopped doing as much backpacking. Now, 99 percent of the time, I car camp. If you backpack enough, then you only have to toss in the backpack to get half way down the list.


Personal pack or gear bag (see below for my personal bag list)
Stove, fuel, igniter, hot pad or mitt, stand for stove
Table
Tent or tents
Screen room
Sleeping bag
Extra blankets
Cot, air mattress or ground pad
Boots or sturdy shoes
Socks, warm socks, extra socks, more socks
T-shirts, underwear, extra jeans
Warm jacket, sweat shirt, synthetic fleece pull-overs and jackets, sweaters
Rain jacket or poncho
Warm gloves or mittens, extra for snow, fleece gloves (I take at least two pair.)
Stocking cap, or special fleece head wrap that covers back of the neck
Rubber boots (Wellington’s)
Personal toiletries (soap, towel, toothbrush, tooth paste, floss, hair brush, small mirror, hand lotion, deodorant)
Repair kit for gear, sewing kit, duct tape
Plastic garbage bags (2 large, sturdy)
Small shovel, toilet paper
Camp stool or folding chair (I have all of the above including a camp Barco-lounger)
Lantern (I take white gas lantern and electric lanterns.)
Eating utensils, mug for warm drinks
Binoculars (when looked through backwards they work as a magnifier)
Reading or corrective glasses and or back-up pairs
Camera
Dog bed and dog blanket
Dog collar and leash

Day pack for hiking or cave exploration (keep stocked with the following)
Pocket knife
Compass
Map, pencil, note pad
Small first aid kit with added cold medicine, Pepto Bismal, Kaopectate, asprin, Tylenol, Benadryl, etc.
Sun hat or cap
Sun screen
Chapstick
Sun glasses
Needlenose pliers (I have a small “Leatherman.”)
Whistle
Waterproof matches
Water bottle
Small nylon rope (50')
Small flashlight
Snacks (carbohydrates, easily digestible foods, salty foods)


Car Essentials:
Fire extinguisher (small, car type)
Wire Come-along lever winch
40' chain
Tow strap
Tool Kit
Tire pressure gauge
Lug wrench
Tire plug kit
Tire air-filler-stem caps
Tire air pump (small electric air compressor that runs off the cigarette lighter)
Assortment of hoses (heater, fuel, air) One of which is long enough to syphon gas
Assortment of hose clamps 4-4",4-3", 4-1.5", several of each smaller size
Assortment of wires, #10 - #14
Baling wire
Assorted nuts and bolts including several lug nuts
Extra fuses
Extra bulbs
Cheap volt/ohm meter and/or “idiot light”
Electrical tape
Brake fluid
Water
Small anchor (as an purchase point in dirt or sand for your hand/electric winch)
Full-size spare tire
Jack, and/or hydraulic jack, and/or “high-lift” jack (big version of bumper jack)
Flares, flasher, or reflective triangle (or all three)
Snow chains
Leather gloves
50' of 3/8" to " yacht braid or equal
Large flashlight (I use a three-cell Maglight)
Maps (I always have a map book that covers the general area.)
Small tarp to lay on while working under vehicle
Rags or paper towels
Hand soap or hand cleaner or moist wipes
Folding shovel
Hand axe or hatchet
Thermometer or recording thermometer
CB unit
Duct tape

In three plastic crates, I take the following:
1.) Group Cooking Gear Crate:
Cooking stuff including: (Some of this is optional)
Pot
Frying pan
Coffee pot (I also bring a giant coffee pot)
Cast iron frying pan (not in crate)
Dutch oven (not in crate)
Toaster (burner toaster holds four slices and folds flat
Pie pan or frying pan with a removable handle
Griddle
Thermos (non-breakable type)
Coffee filter holder
Measuring cup
Can opener
Plastic tub for doing dishes
Thin plastic cutting board
Big knife
Small knife
Spatula
Big spoon with holes
Big spoon with no holes
Ladle
Tongs
Instant-read thermometer
Grater
Carrot peeler
Wine and bottle opener
Sharpening stone
Silverware
Coffee cups (Lexan cups hold heat and cold well and are light weight)
Plates (I always use paper)
Sponge
Dish scrubber
Dog dishes (I usually keep these out where I can feed Sadie or give her water)
Lexan wine glasses with detachable stems and bases (I have some that fit back into
themselves and then fit snugly into my Lexan coffee cups)


2.) Stockable Non-food Items Crate:
Dishtowels
Table cloth (I have a plastic red-and-white checkered)
Toilet paper
Paper towels
Aluminum foil
Plastic wrap (optional)
Plastic zippered bags
Heavy duty trash bags
Paper plates
Paper bowls
Plastic forks
Plastic spoons
Dog poop bags
Dish soap
Clothes pins (plastic non-metal are best)
Hot mitt or hot pads
Coffee filters
Dish towels or hand towels

3.) Stockable Food Items Crate:
Salt
Pepper
Sugar
Brown sugar
Flour
Spices including: cinnamon, garlic powder, sesame seeds
Sesame oil (It will keep for years)
Olive oil (small bottles because it does not last)
Pam (non-stick spray)
Maple syrup
Vinegar (I use a rice wine vinegar)
Dog food: cans, dry food, biscuits
Canned vegetarian or low-fat chile
Pasta
Rice
Dried potato flakes (I bread chicken breasts with these and fry)
Pancake mix
Dried fruit
V-8 juice
Tomato paste
Stewed tomatoes
Canned vegetables
Canned fruit for the pancakes
Cornbread mix (Kusteaz has a non-fat, just add water type)
Canned B&M brown bread with raisons
Canned sardines (In mustard sauce is my favorite.)
Snack crackers
Canned anchovies
Granola bars
Coffee
Tea
Cocoa mix

Group Camping Gear:
Lanterns and lantern stands including extra fuel, batteries, mantels, wicks, funnels
Rope, 3/8", 1/4" and smaller nylon line of multiple lengths for tent guys
Stakes of various kinds
Auxiliary adjustable tent poles (8). I have used up to 15 poles on a hot desert weekend to errect multiple shade tarps.
Toilet seat on a stand
Tarps of various sizes, including one opaque tarp with a silver side for shade
Flag pole and flags (Most of my pole items fit in a cheap ski bag)
Music system
Water jugs (Two five’s for me and up to three others)
Large pan for under campfire (metal oil drip pan)
Small BBQ, briquets, starter fluid
Large heavy duty trash bags
Toilet or shower enclosure
Screen room or shade awning
Chairs and stools
Folding table
Stove and stand
Propane heater(s)
Folding shovel
Hatchet

My personal bag:
1- 10" dia. by 24" nylon zippered bag
2 - small zippered toiletries bags containing:
Pepto Bismal tablets
Tums ant-acid
Advil tablets
Asprin
Toothpaste
Toothebrush with brush end cover
Dental floss
Hair brush (small)
Small mirror
“Stink Nice” (deodorant)
Small hand soap (from motel)
Small shampoo
Small cream rinse
Fingernail clippers
Bic throw-away razors
Styptic pencil
Q-tips
Sun screen
Neosporin
Foot powder or spray
hand moisturizer
Rain gear in a very small stuff bag
Bath / beach towel (For long weekends in the summer, I take two.)
Socks
Underwear
T-shirts
Extra pants or shorts
Bathing suit
Medium jacket (I use a L.L. Bean nylon water resistant jacket with fleece lining. Basically the same as a medium-duty sailing jacket.)
Sweater or fleece pullover in season

Scientific research gear:
Binoculars
Butterfly net
Specimen containers
Killing jar (This is something I can’t, personally, be a party to; however, others may need this for collecting “killed” specimens.)
A plant press
Camera
Note book and writing or drawing pencils and pens for “Field notes.”
Watch
Microscope or binocular dissecting scope or hand lens or magnifying glass
Thermometer
Color guides (I have used Universal color keys for recording oak leaf, top-side hues and bottom-side hues.)
Identification guides and keys
Dimensional measuring devices (Fifty foot tape, metric rule, reticular eye-piece for binocular scope, etc.)

Robert Sharpe, of Cal Tech, published a number of books on Geology in which he uses his pocket knife for dimensional reference. The point is to provide scale when photographing a subject where scale is important.
Etc.

It should be clear by now that I bring everything but the kitchen sink. Okay, I do bring the kitchen sink– in its own camping incarnation. Nothing is taboo. However, everything needs to be evaluated as to how it will function in a given scenario. I have taken “Movie Night” too many times to be suckered into a repeat of that gear-heavy scenario, unless I am sure me or the group will actually be watching a movie. If Thedmo is coming on the trip, I bring Movie Night. And yet, he has been known to disappear in to his tent halfway through the first feature.

caver
12-30-2009, 04:21 PM
Cold beer the rest is just fluff. :)

Dogman
01-03-2010, 07:50 AM
I keep a metric set of wrenches and sockets/ratchet , some screwdrivers and a knife also spare belts and an army folding shovel, a quart of oil, a can of brake/clutch fluid, duct tape and a blanket in my truck at all times. When I go out GT'g I carry a hi-lift jack with wheel lifting attatchment, a GPS, cell phone, my hiking Camelbak which has a 100 oz bladder,first aid kit, emergency space blanket, bear spray, matches etc. If it's fall and winter (the most likely time I'm out GT'g) I carry a wool beanie cap and a pair of gloves. Usually an ice chest with beverages as well. Also my dog is always with me so I bring her bag which has dog treats, first aid, water bowl;)

Tommyknocker
01-07-2010, 05:26 PM
Hey Gary B. Just wanted to say how impressed I was while reading your suggestions for what to take on a trip into the wilds. Very well done and you reminded me of a few things as well.
Good job, and thank you!

TedCebula
03-07-2010, 07:54 PM
Cold beer the rest is just fluff. :)

LOL! But so true. For me, ghost towning and road trips are almost the same thing. Chain saw, firewood, maul, small hatchett, sleeping bag, car's (Jeep) jack, and full tank of gas before I decide to hit the small roads. But, an ice chest with ice and beer is always a plus. A jug of water works for when the beer might run out.

And as for the more 'high tech' stuff, i.e. GPS, my Moto Droid Phone seems to do the rest just fine when I'm too lazy and/or don't have a local map . . . .

Mikejts
03-09-2010, 12:51 PM
Great info from many - Because most of the places I go to the only communications device that works would be a satilite phone, I take a Personal Beacon Locator along in case of injury or other emergency.

Tyroler
04-18-2010, 11:25 AM
Enough to drink,but no Alc and no Sweat
Spot
GPS
Stove
Panne
Cutlery
Sparkmaker
Compass
Paper&Pen
Leather Gloves
few T-Shirts
Jacked
Socks
Raincover
Hammer and Steel Nail to anker Tent on Rocks
First Aid Kit,with plenty Painkiller and Bandage
Touch,or two
Emergency Glow Light
Signal Mirror
Fishing set
Propper Knife
Pocket Knife
wind up Radio
GPS Phone
Flask and Coffee Powder
Map
Shovel
Camera
Binocular
tent
2 Sleepingbags

Tyroler
04-18-2010, 11:57 AM
Now if only more people knew and understood that concept!

But, like they say, "Common sense isn't so common after all, is it?" Just a bit of common sense goes a long way.

It's like the GPS story of the couple getting lost in the snowstorm. They had the latest technology, but lacked the common sense to use that fabulous technology wisely. They probably didn't even know there was a choice between "shortest" and "fastest" route on the GPS. New school.

On the other hand, they DID have survival supplies with them in the car. Old school.

Seems like there's a bit of disconnect between technology and common sense anymore. New school doesn't seem to carry the common sense like old school does.

Too much blind trust in new school, IMHO.

Thats why i always try staying with experianced together.Its just that we don't know much of Dessert Danger

David A. Wright
04-20-2010, 09:13 AM
I keep a metric set of wrenches and sockets/ratchet ,...
Though likely you already know what you need to bring, I just thought I'd pass along this.

As for tools, with modern vehicles, don't assume if your vehicle is American made you need SAE tools, if it's foreign you need metric. I found this out the hard way.

I run a 2002 Toyota Tacoma TRD 4WD pickup. I've seldom wrenched on it, but about a year ago replaced the battery. Just to get the old battery out and new on in required both SAE and metric tools. Even the battery hold down brace had one each 12mm and a 1/2" bolts! My Tacoma was built in the USA as are most Toyotas nowadays and I thought maybe this was just an anomoly. But talking with others, I've found that American vehicles have the same situation. A friend with a 2007 Jeep Wrangler JK has had the same experience.

So you might just check out a few nuts and bolts on your vehicle to make sure. It's a real pain because it requires nearly double the amount of tools necessary to carry when you have a mix of SAE and metric.

Darin
04-20-2010, 09:55 AM
That also holds true for lug nuts (which some don't think about) as well. My 75 Chevy pick up has standard lugs but the wifes 04 Trail Blazer has metric....best to have a star wrench when travelling. Some are two standards, a metric and a flat to remove the cover, and others are a two standard and two metric sizes.

imagesoftheforgotten
07-26-2010, 08:56 AM
All you need is a metric set. Metric tools (a high quality set from craftsman ect, NOT some cheap Harbor Freight stuff) will fit on standard nuts bolts, BUT standard tools DO NOT fit metric. There is NO reason to carry 500lbs of tools.

Bob
07-26-2010, 12:35 PM
A Long time ago - Anyone every hear of Whitworth - I learned that if you didn't have the right tool - you either improvished or were SOL. I also agree, don't carry 500Lbs of cheap crap that breaks when you need it! What I have is an canvas tool bag courtesy of my days in the service (And a couple more I've purchased for each vehicle and motorcycle I ventured in to the wild with). Whenever I work on a vehichle or bike I only use tools from its bag. If I need a tool I don't have in the bag, I make it, purchase (Snap-on or Craftsman ussually) or borrow from home tools (Which I then replace) and when done add it to the bag. I do have a bunch of bailing wire, duct tape, vise grips, asjustable jaws (Crescent Tool Company) and such for make do and helping others but for my stuff I have what it takes.

I also carry a small box which has rations and water for a few days, a HF ham radio and enough wire to Jerry Rig for help, provishing for keeping warm, making a fire (Chink of magnesium, knife, flint, and some dry tinder), first aid kit, and an AR-7 survical rifle. Total weight less than 75 pounds but in a pinch - glad I have it!

lassen Tr. resrchr 1973
07-26-2010, 02:42 PM
Hmmm whatch drive ,,a troop carrier

I carry a ccw because a cop is too heavy

Tyroler
08-30-2010, 05:25 PM
Jack, spare tire, and compressor.
Map (on laptop), and gps.
Gun and ammo.
Duct tape, flashlight.
Small tool set, hatchet and lighter.
Plenty of beer and Spam. :-)

Wife.

Rubber of old Tire tube.Burns always,even if everything is wet
Mirror
Spot http://international.findmespot.com/
lots of Humor

Peter999
01-18-2011, 08:00 PM
Say can some-one connected with those mine exploration groups e-mail me please??? I know there are many interesting \ long abandoned \ maybe haunted \ DANGEROUS old workings in New Mexico I am a fairly capable explorer but have not had much to do (YET) with abandoned mine workings.

HOPALONG33
01-21-2011, 12:27 PM
i'm fairly new to gt's/mine exploration, been doing it about a year or so. I don't own a 4x4 yet and have read the other topic of "what get's you there". But that thread doesn't include what you carry in your vehicle? So i'd like to know what you consider to me most important when out wheeling?


Also i'd like to know what you all are carrying on yourselves to go hiking as well as equipment? I take two flashlights, cell phone, knife, granola, lighter, hat and water. I haven't found a good water container or backpack yet - still looking

i was just curious as to what everyone takes and considers invaluable when out ;) a .45 is all you need.

Vegas_Nick
01-22-2011, 09:25 PM
I finally started stocking my FJ up with tools, a good medical kit, hi-lift jack and recovery kit. I also just bought a 2 meter ham radio and CB to add.

Darin
01-23-2011, 06:01 PM
I finally started stocking my FJ up with tools, a good medical kit, hi-lift jack and recovery kit. I also just bought a 2 meter ham radio and CB to add.

What kind of radios/antennas? I use a Cobra 148GTL/K40 on the '04 Trailblazer for the trips and FMRS handhelds for the wife and I when out in the "field". They really come in handy!!!

ghosttrain2
01-24-2011, 12:59 PM
Say can some-one connected with those mine exploration groups e-mail me please??? I know there are many interesting \ long abandoned \ maybe haunted \ DANGEROUS old workings in New Mexico I am a fairly capable explorer but have not had much to do (YET) with abandoned mine workings.

Might read through some posts on this forum, they are very knowledgable in this field-some are on mine rescue teams.
http://www.mojaveunderground.com/forum/index.php?sid=94b76db37590c02a064d20efe7a3d7de
they are based in Utah, most being in the Salt Lake City area.

ghosttrain2
01-24-2011, 01:03 PM
Keep the usual- Water,maps,water,snacks,water,use a CB-don't have a 2-way radio...
some tools,spare fan belt,rock hammers,binoculars,camera, GPS.

Vegas_Nick
01-24-2011, 10:07 PM
What kind of radios/antennas? I use a Cobra 148GTL/K40 on the '04 Trailblazer for the trips and FMRS handhelds for the wife and I when out in the "field". They really come in handy!!!

A have Yaesu FT-1900R with a magentic mount antenna. (will be changing that to a better setup soon) As far as the CB goes, I have the Cobra 29 WXNWST with a 4ft Firestick. I may add a set of walkies like that just in case! Good isea.

Darin
01-25-2011, 11:52 AM
A have Yaesu FT-1900R with a magentic mount antenna. (will be changing that to a better setup soon) As far as the CB goes, I have the Cobra 29 WXNWST with a 4ft Firestick. I may add a set of walkies like that just in case! Good isea.
Nice...I can see where those (WX) weather stations/alerts would come in handy, especially when out in the middle of nowhere. Never thought about that before. Great idea!!! http://forums.ghosttowns.com/images/icons/icon14.gif

Vegas_Nick
01-25-2011, 08:52 PM
Yep, That is why I bought it. I like having access to the weather info. I really didn't want to add a third radio so that made the Cobra an easy choice.

cowboy1881
01-28-2011, 08:05 AM
Great photos dwonslow. That represents a lot of time and effort. Thank you, John