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Ghosttowns.com
09-02-2001, 09:24 PM
Originally posted by Judsaw


: I didn't see any comments on the Message Board about poison gas, which is often found inside of these old mines. This is a good reason for someone to stay completely outside of the mine while the rest of your party enters the mine. But, if you are overcome by gas you maybe history before any help can reach you. Think well before you try this stunt. Try the silver mine at Calico, Ca if you are trying to entertain the kids. It is real mine and is very safe, but still a good look at what it was like.

Ghosttowns.com
09-03-2001, 02:34 PM
Originally posted by Cat and Ripley


: Dangerous gases in mines like carbon monoxide and methane are a serious concern with any and all mine explorers! This is why checking for a breeze within the mine is a neccesity! Its not a guanantee but your chances are lowered. Check out an earlier discussion on the message board about mine safety from about a month ago! Good hints and safety ideas!



: : I didn't see any comments on the Message Board about poison gas, which is often found inside of these old mines. This is a good reason for someone to stay completely outside of the mine while the rest of your party enters the mine. But, if you are overcome by gas you maybe history before any help can reach you. Think well before you try this stunt. Try the silver mine at Calico, Ca if you are trying to entertain the kids. It is real mine and is very safe, but still a good look at what it was like.

Ghosttowns.com
09-04-2001, 08:19 AM
Originally posted by Cactusman


: Cat!!! You are too kind :O)

Ghosttowns.com
09-04-2001, 10:00 AM
Originally posted by Steve O


: : I didn't see any comments on the Message Board about poison gas, which is often found inside of these old mines. This is a good reason for someone to stay completely outside of the mine while the rest of your party enters the mine. But, if you are overcome by gas you maybe history before any help can reach you. Think well before you try this stunt. Try the silver mine at Calico, Ca if you are trying to entertain the kids. It is real mine and is very safe, but still a good look at what it was like.



: Cactusman had advised previously that for anyone planning to do such a thing, extensive planning and preparation should be done. I would add that to handle the gas issue, you can buy portable industrial instruments designed for workers in coinfined spaces that will monitor CO, CO2, Oxygen level, and combustible gases (like Methane). They are small enough to clip on your belt, and give audio and visual alerts as well as a digital reading (impt for Oxygen level). Such a device would warn you to exit before you go in too far. They aren't cheap, ~$1500-$2000 for what I described, but I wouldn't go without one.

Ghosttowns.com
09-07-2001, 03:19 PM
Originally posted by Cat and Ripley


: Cactusman,

: Ok, this might sound like a crazy (or stupid) question but I'm hoping you might know the answer.

: I'm looking into picking up a new flashlight and the one I'm interested in has a xenon gas filled bi-pin bulb. Would this be hazardous in a mine if it came into contact with other gases?

: Also, what is your thinking on taking lanterns into mines? I never have in the past because I wasnt sure of the saftey factor, any ideas?

: Thanks a bunch!

Ghosttowns.com
09-08-2001, 05:57 AM
Originally posted by Cactusman


: Hi Cat!



: For starters, there is no such thing as a stupid question. A long time ago, I used gas operated helmet lanterns. They worked by producing a flammable gas from a powder/water mix. I had a flame several inches long that produced light, heat, and a poisonous gas! lol Before the days of dependable batteries and affordable bulbs, this kind of equipment was a ness. risk, if you needed or wanted to go very far under ground. The REAL risk is that several of the gasses found in caverns have no oder and are volitile long before they begin to have a biological effect. In short, your flamin' forehead can blow you up before you even realize you have encountered a gas hazard!



: I strongly recommend battery power over combustion for underground lighting. As far as bulbs go, any high output bulb will be fine as long as it is shielded. That means that you should not use a bare bulb. It should have a lens in front of it to partially protect it from bumps that could shatter it and leave you groping through your backpack for a spare light :O) This may sound odd, but for those unexpected blackouts, I carry a penlight in my pocket for those "Oh crap where did my spare go" moments. I normally don't carry my spare on my hip because if you fall, you can damage both of your lights at the same time.



: Feel free to contact me at any time :O)



: Cactusman

Ghosttowns.com
09-08-2001, 09:16 AM
Originally posted by Cat and Ripley


: Cactusman,

: Thanks for answering my goofy questions!

: What part of the states are you in? I know of some extremely cool mines that I think you'd love exploring! Intact with track and even an ore car or two!



: ~cat and ripley



:

: : Hi Cat!



: : For starters, there is no such thing as a stupid question. A long time ago, I used gas operated helmet lanterns. They worked by producing a flammable gas from a powder/water mix. I had a flame several inches long that produced light, heat, and a poisonous gas! lol Before the days of dependable batteries and affordable bulbs, this kind of equipment was a ness. risk, if you needed or wanted to go very far under ground. The REAL risk is that several of the gasses found in caverns have no oder and are volitile long before they begin to have a biological effect. In short, your flamin' forehead can blow you up before you even realize you have encountered a gas hazard!



: : I strongly recommend battery power over combustion for underground lighting. As far as bulbs go, any high output bulb will be fine as long as it is shielded. That means that you should not use a bare bulb. It should have a lens in front of it to partially protect it from bumps that could shatter it and leave you groping through your backpack for a spare light :O) This may sound odd, but for those unexpected blackouts, I carry a penlight in my pocket for those "Oh crap where did my spare go" moments. I normally don't carry my spare on my hip because if you fall, you can damage both of your lights at the same time.



: : Feel free to contact me at any time :O)



: : Cactusman

Ghosttowns.com
09-08-2001, 09:31 AM
Originally posted by Cactusman


: Thanks for the offer Cat!



: I'm in southern Arizona. In a few months, I'll be in Virginia in the area of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Ghosttowns.com
09-23-2002, 06:38 PM
Originally posted by Yvan P.Charbonneau

: : : I didn't see any comments on the Message Board about poison gas, which is often found inside of these old mines. This is a good reason for someone to stay completely outside of the mine while the rest of your party enters the mine. But, if you are overcome by gas you maybe history before any help can reach you. Think well before you try this stunt. Try the silver mine at Calico, Ca if you are trying to entertain the kids. It is real mine and is very safe, but still a good look at what it was like.

: I'm 23 years old but a great adept of ghosttown hunting, and I document railway sites and mines. In my short esperience some of the undetectable gases may be H2S, if much rotting matter is left in place it may begin to releas some gas. In older unventilated shafts they may keep in hidden pockets. In high concentrations (50ppm+) a person drpos uncouncious within seconds, and cannot be revived (unless he is brought back to fresh air)and subsequently dies. Also the type of rock may also be of concern, some silver mines for instance do contain high toxic amounts of arsenic, if any splash back enters your mouth sometimes the consequences may be graet and deadly. One mine Iexplored had that same problem where the water inside was so toxic that a lick was enough to kill stray dogs on the spot (the carcasses prove it). Some may be entered without fear of any reprisals but you can never be to sure.