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View Full Version : "Gold Rush" to Massachuetts in 1875 ?



Ghosttowns.com
05-17-2002, 04:20 AM
Originally posted by johnnie

: Yes there was a "Gold Rush" to (Essex county) Massachuetts as reported in the Arizona Miner feb.12 1875 and was orignally reported by one of their corrasondents for the New York Tribune dated Dec, 30 1875 the artical stated new rich discoveries of gold, silver, lead , and copper,found in Essex county near Newbury, and all of the long time residents couldn`t believe that such wealth was found right under their noses, the discovery was made by a fellow named Rogers,as he was walking through highfield pastures when he spotted some stones that had a "gleam" to them, and when he bent over and pick a few up that look promising he was supprised that they were so heavy for their size so he took them over to his friends that lived close by a Mr.Albert Adams and so Adams did some more checking and found out who owned the land and then bought it for $4,200 from a man named Jaquith, and then stared mining his claim and when the word got out about the new discovery it attracted some experience miners from Calif. and Nevada and a E.P. Shaw and E.M. Boynton then bought into the new discover.

: Now! that was "it" of the artical in this old Newspaper that I came across, while researching something else, and I though it might be interesting to rest you other Ghost Town "Buffs" now when I look up what was posted on our ghost town web-page there was no listing of any "Essex" county I guess the name was change somewhere down the line.

: Anyway I though you guys that had postings on Massachueets web-page might find it intresting to do some research on this mine was ther a town built up around thisnew dicovery? and this "Gold Rush" to Essex county.

:
: Lots of luck!

: Johnnie



:
:

Johnnie
11-18-2004, 10:14 AM
[QUOTE=Ghosttowns.com]Originally posted by johnnie

: Yes there was a Gold Rush to (Essex county) Massachuetts as reported in the Arizona Miner feb.12 1875 and was orignally reported by one of their corrasondents for the New York Tribune dated Dec, 30 1875 the artical stated new rich discoveries of gold, silver, lead , and copper,found in Essex county near Newbury, and all of the long time residents couldn`t believe that such wealth was found right under their noses, the discovery was made by a fellow named Rogers,as he was walking through Highfield pastures, when he spotted some stones that had a "gleam" to them, and when he bent over and pick a few up that look promising he was supprised that they were so heavy for their size so he took them over to his friends that lived closeby, by the name of Mr.Albert Adams. After doing some more checking Mr. Adams, look up the owner and then bought it for $4,200 from a man named Jaquith, and then stared mining his claim and when the word got out about the new discovery it attracted some experience miners from Calif. and Nevada and a E.P. Shaw and E.M. Boynton who then wanted to invest their experience and "Gubstake" also into the new discover. Unfortunate that was end of the story.

: Now! that all of the artical of this old Newspaper that I came across, while researching something else, and I though it might be interesting to rest you other Ghost Towners, now when I look up what was posted on our ghost town web-page there was no listing of any "Essex" county I guess the name was change somewhere down the line.

: Anyway I though you guys that had postings on Massachueets web-page might find it intresting to do some research on this mine was there a town built up around this new dicovery? and this "Gold Rush" to Essex county.

:
: Lots of luck!!!
: Johnnie -----> Thanks to ghosttowns.com Rawk Crawlin for knowledge and expertise on updateing my old posting from 2 yrs ago to the the present Bulletin Board.

Thanks again
Johnnie & Sheila

old judge
06-26-2005, 11:10 AM
[QUOTE=Ghosttowns.com]Originally posted by johnnie

: Yes there was a Gold Rush to (Essex county) Massachuetts as reported in the Arizona Miner feb.12 1875 and was orignally reported by one of their corrasondents for the New York Tribune dated Dec, 30 1875 the artical stated new rich discoveries of gold, silver, lead , and copper,found in Essex county near Newbury, and all of the long time residents couldn`t believe that such wealth was found right under their noses, the discovery was made by a fellow named Rogers,as he was walking through highfield pastures when he spotted some stones that had a "gleam" to them, and when he bent over and pick a few up that look promising he was supprised that they were so heavy for their size so he took them over to his friends that lived close by a Mr.Albert Adams and so Adams did some more checking and found out who owned the land and then bought it for $4,200 from a man named Jaquith, and then stared mining his claim and when the word got out about the new discovery it attracted some experience miners from Calif. and Nevada and a E.P. Shaw and E.M. Boynton then bought into the new discover.

: Now! that was what was in the artical of this old Newspaper that I came across, while researching something else, and I though it might be interesting to rest you other Ghost Towners, now when I look up what was posted on our ghost town web-page there was no listing of any "Essex" county I guess the name was change somewhere down the line.

: Anyway I though you guys that had postings on Massachueets web-page might find it intresting to do some research on this mine was ther a town built up around thisnew dicovery? and this "Gold Rush" to Essex county.

:
: Lots of luck!

: Johnnie -----> Thanks to ghosttowns.com Rawk Crawlin for knowledge and expertise on updateing my old posting from 2 yrs ago to the the present Bulletin Board.

Thanks again
Johnnie & Sheila A good post, and I'm tired of looking at Glenn Dale Hospital. Mike

Johnnie
06-27-2005, 07:07 AM
A good post, and I'm tired of looking at Glenn Dale Hospital. MikeThanks! O. J. On some very rare occasions we all welcome "Bumps" in the road on our way too Ghost Towns.

Johnnie & Sheila

Johnnie
11-13-2005, 08:24 AM
Has anyone on the East Coast check out Essex,County for any lost "Gold Mines" But first read our posting about the "Gold Rush" to Essex County in 1875 that we found in a old Arizona newspaper artical.

Sheila & Johnnie

podunklander
11-13-2005, 05:04 PM
Has anyone on the East Coast check out Essex,County for any lost "Gold Mines" But first read our posting about the "Gold Rush" to Essex County in 1875 that we found in a old Arizona newspaper artical.

Sheila & JohnnieHi!

This is really interesting! Some things from the article though, seem sensationalized (surprise, surprise). Mining history in New England is not-widely known, but from what little I've learned...it is absolutely fascinating.

So far the only mine in Massachusetts that I've had a chance to visit is the graphite mine on Leadmine Road (appropriate name) in Sturbridge. This mine is on conservation land and is open to the public.

Mining lead began in Mass as early as the latter part of the 17th century. Indians mined lead for to use as pigment.

This lead mine closed around 1875, obviously since most headed West to stake their own claims, etc. There was still a good mining and mining-related industry back East here and much mining machinery/equipment used out West was manufactured here. I saw some (from Farmington, CT) of this when I visited Bodie.

Of course, Indians mined everything from steatite to copper. Plenty of those quarry sites around. The best I saw was a soapstone bowl that was being carved out of the side of an outcropping. Whoever was working it, never completed it and it is really kewl to see it jutting out, unfinished. Though relatively easy to carve, still this was terribly labor intensive and replaced by pottery vessels, which were in wide use starting about 3,000 years ago.

Please check out my dear old friend, Tara Prindle's Native American Technologies website www.nativetech.org (http://www.nativetech.org) . A+ articles based on her research, and wonderful presentation - not just for pottery but lithic technologies for sure. Great presentation on lithic samples and for tool identification - she's among the best. She developed 'Point 1.0' and I have used this to identify projectile point types.

Starting in the late 1600's settlers relied on Indians to lead them to resources they could mine.

Copper mining was widely popular here. The Old Newgate Prison and Copper Mine in Granby, CT is a State-owned National Historic Landmark site and therefore open to the public. There has been a stair case built (prior to that, there was a ladder) and you can easily walk down into the mine shaft.

Back in 1998, I finally had a chance to go down in the shaft one day during my lunch hour. The site was closed to the public at the time and we were conducting archaeological testing for the handicap ramp that was to be constructed. I don't recall all we found while digging, but certainly can't forget the tons of tailings we had to excavate and sift through.

It was an active copper mine beginning in 1705 (1st and earliest used for the Colonial governement) and later, was turned into a prison during the American Revolution.

I did find evidence of early (pre-Rev. War) copper mining activity up on Hurricane Ridge in Corinth, VT. This was part of a vein of copper that runs along the nearby Wait's River. Copper was a big part of economic life in the region until the end of WWII.

The name 'Wait' btw is that of Lt. Col. Benjamin Wait, who served 1st during the William & Mary and later, the Rev. War. 'Fort Wait' was a military fort built in 1781. I have a lot of great info related to Fort Wait so I'll have to post this someday.

And back here in CT there are also barium mines (probably from the 1800's) in a town along the shore.

In the more recent past, some fellows hit it big with a claim to mine amethyst up in New Hampshire. The amethyst there is purported to be worth upwards of $3 million.

I always would love to know more about mining activity in the New England States. I had recently learned of a mining museum located in the Western part of Ct and hope to visit sometime. Maybe they'ld have more info about the Newbury mines - so I'll definetly ask.

podunklander
11-13-2005, 07:00 PM
One of the photos I tried to attach - of the mining activity on Hurricane Ridge in VT, didn't. I resized it and am trying again here.

Pam

Johnnie
11-14-2005, 06:02 AM
Pam, Thanks for the great information. We all learned something from your history lesson thanks again for taking the time to post the history of these early pioneers on the East Coast, We ourselves have not done much research, on anything east of the Mississippi River,

Your Fellow Ghosttowners
Johnnie & Sheila

Johnnie
12-02-2005, 07:49 AM
Hi!

This is really interesting! Some things from the article though, seem sensationalized (surprise, surprise). Mining history in New England is not-widely known, but from what little I've learned...it is absolutely fascinating.

So far the only mine in Massachusetts that I've had a chance to visit is the graphite mine on Leadmine Road (appropriate name) in Sturbridge. This mine is on conservation land and is open to the public.

Mining lead began in Mass as early as the latter part of the 17th century. Indians mined lead for to use as pigment.

This lead mine closed around 1875, obviously since most headed West to stake their own claims, etc. There was still a good mining and mining-related industry back East here and much mining machinery/equipment used out West was manufactured here. I saw some (from Farmington, CT) of this when I visited Bodie.

Of course, Indians mined everything from steatite to copper. Plenty of those quarry sites around. The best I saw was a soapstone bowl that was being carved out of the side of an outcropping. Whoever was working it, never completed it and it is really kewl to see it jutting out, unfinished. Though relatively easy to carve, still this was terribly labor intensive and replaced by pottery vessels, which were in wide use starting about 3,000 years ago.

Please check out my dear old friend, Tara Prindle's Native American Technologies website www.nativetech.org (http://www.nativetech.org/) . A+ articles based on her research, and wonderful presentation - not just for pottery but lithic technologies for sure. Great presentation on lithic samples and for tool identification - she's among the best. She developed 'Point 1.0' and I have used this to identify projectile point types.

Starting in the late 1600's settlers relied on Indians to lead them to resources they could mine.

Copper mining was widely popular here. The Old Newgate Prison and Copper Mine in Granby, CT is a State-owned National Historic Landmark site and therefore open to the public. There has been a stair case built (prior to that, there was a ladder) and you can easily walk down into the mine shaft.

Back in 1998, I finally had a chance to go down in the shaft one day during my lunch hour. The site was closed to the public at the time and we were conducting archaeological testing for the handicap ramp that was to be constructed. I don't recall all we found while digging, but certainly can't forget the tons of tailings we had to excavate and sift through.

It was an active copper mine beginning in 1705 (1st and earliest used for the Colonial governement) and later, was turned into a prison during the American Revolution.

I did find evidence of early (pre-Rev. War) copper mining activity up on Hurricane Ridge in Corinth, VT. This was part of a vein of copper that runs along the nearby Wait's River. Copper was a big part of economic life in the region until the end of WWII.

The name 'Wait' btw is that of Lt. Col. Benjamin Wait, who served 1st during the William & Mary and later, the Rev. War. 'Fort Wait' was a military fort built in 1781. I have a lot of great info related to Fort Wait so I'll have to post this someday.

And back here in CT there are also barium mines (probably from the 1800's) in a town along the shore.

In the more recent past, some fellows hit it big with a claim to mine amethyst up in New Hampshire. The amethyst there is purported to be worth upwards of $3 million.

I always would love to know more about mining activity in the New England States. I had recently learned of a mining museum located in the Western part of Ct and hope to visit sometime. Maybe they'ld have more info about the Newbury mines - so I'll definetly ask.------> "NEW UPDATE"

Everyone check out Frank Pandozzi Web site. and yesterday bulletin board posting "Historyies Treasures" (Ghost Towns Of The East Coast) Pam you are going to like this web-site of Franks, Sheila & I sure did.

Your Fellow Ghostthowners
Johnnie & Sheila

podunklander
12-14-2005, 07:52 PM
Please do not take offense or take this personally, but I will not give this guy a minute of my time. While I am doing gratis work for CT State Parks/Forests - working tirelessly to salvage artifacts and cleaning up the mess leftover from metal-detecting activity...I cannot condone this type of activity.

I have spent days and hours researching an 18th C. historic house foundation in the State Forest that was vandalized. This site and info I provided has been reviewed by SHPO and it was recommended to be 'protected' as an 'archaeological preserve'. It is my hope that it will, and then not only if the person who has been doing the metal-detecting (if caught) be breaking State Law, this will then be a Federal offense.

These areas are now being monitored more closely and frequently. In the meantime I am making an all-out effort to identify, document and monitor historic and prehistoric sites on these State Lands.

I can't believe the destruction that I have seen for the sake of a few freebie coins! Similarl to protecting the natural resources on these State Lands in CT, these cultural resources on public lands are not to be destroyed.

The 18th c. house that was vandalized was built by a Rev. War patriot, Thomas Anderson in 1792. Thomas was one of 'Knowlton's Rangers' , having belonged to the company commanded by Capt. Thomas Knowlton. In his pension petition of 1833 [State of Connecticut, County of Tolland, Probate District] Thomas testifies that the sabaltern officers were Lieut. Keyes, Lieut Allen and Ensign Hill.

This was his 1st tour of duty, having enlisted into service of the U.S. on May 7th, 1775. According to Anderson, "We were marched immediately to Cambridge in the State of Massachusetts and belonged to a regiment commanded by Col. Israel Putnam...Capt. Knowlton with about half of his company was in the battle of Bunker Hill. I was one who was in that battle."

In December of 1776, thomas enlisted into a company commanded by Capt. Payne Converse and sepnt 3 1/2 months in Providence, RI, where he was employed in keeping guard, digging entrenchments and oher duties. This regiment was commanded by Col. Ely.

Beginning in May of 1778, "about planting time", Thomas was recruited into the new levies corps to recruit troops for the Continental Army.

His last tour of duty began in May of 1781. He had been living in Westford, VT and belonged to a company commanded by Capt. Seely [Sealy], "Col. Wait commanded the whole. We were marched to a place they called Corinth. I continued this service keeping guard and on scouting parties to protect that part of the country from the Indian. about seven months. We built a fort at Corinth and that was the place of rendevous. The whole tour. The effort was called Fort Wait. One of our scouting parties was attacked by Indians who killed 2 and took the rest and carried to Canada..."

[excepts from, "Thomas Anderson Delaration, Revolutionary War Series, Connecticut Archives pg. 68a]

I also have verification of Thomas' service in VT via documentation provided to me by the VT State Archives and State Library. I have travelled to Corinth to investigate the site (and purported to be location) of Fort Wait.

The construction techniques that Anderson used for building this house are 'unique' in that he built up the land for protection from wetlands and supported the foundation with soil and a stone retaining wall (like a fort would be!).

Of the artifacts that were tossed away while the person involved in illegally metal-detecting here 'discarded' included some fragments of salt-glazed stoneware and an intact, pewter spoon. The spoon was tossed into an area where there was timber-harvesting and surely would have been destroyed if I hadn't recovered it.

I found many glass buttons in some of the holes that were left exposed. I did learn that the house was later leased to a man who worked at the glass button factory.

In any case - from just what I shared here...please consider that Frank Pandozzi 'trashes' my work and those of archaeologists whom similarly work hard to interpret and protect sites such as these. He makes ignorant accusations and generalizations about archaeologists and museums.

He 'justifies' the theft of artifacts via metal-detecting by claiming that at least he can share these items with others and claims that we don't exhibit artifacts etc. Come on!

When you remove an artifact from it's context you lose the provenience! Even a coin - post datum quem...they can be important clues for dating a site! Artifacts have to be cleaned, identified, researched, catalogued, etc., and that is often done by volunteers and/or when funding is available. Creating exhibits, displays and interpretaion take time.

And guys like him will always try to find something 'wrong' with the work of archaeologists in order to justify his illegal activity and that which he promotes as 'history'.

So look at some of the info I've provided here and what others can learn from valid work and research - trying to regain information from incomplete data (artifacts) that have been extruded from the soil matrix and thrown out of context while yet others have been 'lost'.

THAT is not a valid way to promote and interpret history!

Pam








------> "NEW UPDATE"

Everyone check out Frank Pandozzi Web site. and yesterday bulletin board posting "Historyies Treasures" (Ghost Towns Of The East Coast) Pam you are going to like this web-site of Franks, Sheila & I sure did.

Your Fellow Ghostthowners
Johnnie & Sheila

dremoto
09-01-2008, 12:40 PM
I tend to agree that Frank Pandozzi is just someone who is searching and raping the land for his own personal gain. Upon reading his page I was amazed to see just how much he commercialized everything. He is out for a quick buck. With the quote "Searching for ghost towns in the eastern states is an exciting adventure. You can have an a great time locating them. Add metal detecting to the fun, and your adventure is doubly rewarded." you can see that in the end he is only looking for a walk-away reward of some trinket or such. Shame on you Frank Pandozzi. Hopefully his exploitation will end soon.

Johnnie
09-05-2008, 04:28 AM
Originally posted by johnnie

: Yes there was a "Gold Rush" to (Essex county) Massachuetts as reported in the Arizona Miner feb.12 1875 and was orignally reported by one of their corrasondents for the New York Tribune dated Dec, 30 1875 the artical stated new rich discoveries of gold, silver, lead , and copper,found in Essex county near Newbury, and all of the long time residents couldn`t believe that such wealth was found right under their noses, the discovery was made by a fellow named Rogers,as he was walking through highfield pastures when he spotted some stones that had a "gleam" to them, and when he bent over and pick a few up that look promising he was supprised that they were so heavy for their size so he took them over to his friends that lived close by a Mr.Albert Adams and so Adams did some more checking and found out who owned the land and then bought it for $4,200 from a man named Jaquith, and then stared mining his claim and when the word got out about the new discovery it attracted some experience miners from Calif. and Nevada and a E.P. Shaw and E.M. Boynton then bought into the new discover.

: Now! that was "it" of the artical in this old Newspaper that I came across, while researching something else, and I though it might be interesting to rest you other Ghost Town "Buffs" now when I look up what was posted on our ghost town web-page there was no listing of any "Essex" county I guess the name was change somewhere down the line.

: Anyway I though you guys that had postings on Massachueets web-page might find it intresting to do some research on this mine was ther a town built up around thisnew dicovery? and this "Gold Rush" to Essex county.

:
: Lots of luck!

: Johnnie



:
:

Thanks fellow ghosttowner for reposting what we thought was an interesting story on a gold rush east of the Mississippi, Just haven't had time to post our tresure stories as we once did maybe we have to find time as one fellow ghosttowner e-mailed stated.:cool:

Thaanks again
Johnnie & Sheila

LauraA
09-05-2008, 12:51 PM
Johnnie & Sheila, it's always good to hear from you! :)

Johnnie
09-10-2008, 11:04 AM
Johnnie & Sheila, it's always good to hear from you! :)

Thanks Laura, we try to read and respond to as much as we can on the bulletin board but just don't seem to have the time and need as we once did. But we hope that changes soon.

Your fellow ghosttowners
Johnnie & Sheila:)

lacal
09-11-2008, 04:42 PM
As a new poster I can tell you that there use to be a gold mine that was shown on topo maps along old Route One around Newburyport, Ma.

Johnnie
09-12-2008, 06:59 AM
As a new poster I can tell you that there use to be a gold mine that was shown on topo maps along old Route One around Newburyport, Ma.

Thanks Lacal, for info.On the Travel Channel there is a program that covers all of the U S and is called " Where to find cash and Treasure" and has had segments on the program that showed gold mines on east coast including all sort of expensive gems mines also that is open to the public and you can buy buckets of ore samples to sift through.


Happy Hunting
Johnnie & Sheila