Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Native Americans, found Gold in Utah

  1. #1
    Johnnie's Avatar
    Johnnie is offline Rawk Crawlin GPS Totin Ghost Towning Expert
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    599

    Smile Native Americans, found Gold in Utah

    We don't have time now to post this story. But will try to post it soon. Our fellow ghosttowner Rachel, in Utah might have heard of this story in earstern Utah, In the Snake Indian country, Native Americans found lots of Gold nuggets that they brought into the trading posts to buy supplies. But the White Man did not find out till later on where these Native Americans found so much of these gold nuggets and which canyon this mystery gold ledge was located.

    Johnnie & Sheila
    Last edited by Johnnie; 12-13-2004 at 04:22 AM.

  2. #2
    Johnnie's Avatar
    Johnnie is offline Rawk Crawlin GPS Totin Ghost Towning Expert
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    599

    Smile Earstern Utah lost Gold

    Now here is the rest of the story. In the 1800s many trappers, scouts, and other pioneers, traveled west to seek out their dreams, Most of the pioneers came west to look for gold. Many of the Native Americans, did find gold but did not cherish this yellow metal, like the white man did, but as time went on they too learned that this pretty yellow "Gold Nuggets' could buy just about anything they wanted, from the white settler, who would do anything for this yellow metal, so the local Indians started to visiting their local trading posts, and started buying up all they could with their gold nuggets.

    Now in eastern Utah there is an area that some prospectors came across in Snake Indian country that had good green grass, and plenty of water on the base of a low-lying granite mountain, where you could see iron-stained mesas nearby,

    And so this is where the old prospectors stop to do some more exploring, And in this local area the prospectors, found some "Pot Holes" in the surrounding rocks, but when they took a closer look is when they remebered the story that one of the indian women had told them years before, about some glitter coming from several of these pot holes, that were filled with water, as they approched some of these pools, and waded out into one of the larger ones, they too seen some glitter coming from the bottom of the pool, As they scoop up some sand and started panning out some of this gravel is when they found a lot of gold nuggets, So the miners started setting up a permenant camp site. As time went on they figured they had found about $600 dollars worth of gold, Then winter started to set in, So they pack up their gear, and planed to return in the spring,

    Just like most of the stories of other prospectors that find rich strikes, they always plan to return. But the same thing happens over and over they just can't not find the same valley or the same mountains, or the same creek, that they stumbled across earlier. and rich strike lost forever.

    The old timers and sheepherders, and cowboys, refer to this area in eastern Utah as the "Pot Holes" but never found any gold in the area like old prospectors did.

    According to one version of the lost "Pot Holes" gold story, Is the pot holes described are not natural holes such that occur in sandstone formations in many parts of the west, but were excavations made in gravel conglomerate by the Snake indain tribe. This fortune still awaits the prospector who is willing to go out and try to find this glomeerate deposits.

    Happy Treasure Hunting
    Johnnie & Sheila
    Last edited by Johnnie; 12-13-2004 at 03:47 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Another Story about Snake Indians

    Yvette D. Ison
    History Blazer, May 1995

    During the summer of 1843, Mountain Men, Native Americans, and fur traders throughout the region spread the word about an exciting event to take place in August. Sir William Drummond Stewart, an English nobleman, was sponsoring a horse race that would pit his Missouri horses against those of the American West. The race, officially called the "Rocky Mountain Sweepstakes," brought observers and competitors alike to a meadow near Fort Bridger, between Willow Creek and the Green River.

    Before the races began on August 14, those planning to participate in the events set up camp at Piney Fork. Trappers and Snake Indians camped alongside each other to facilitate trading. For nearly two weeks the camp was bustling with activity. Snake Indians negotiated with the fur traders for the best prices on beads, guns, and fur. Skilled seamstresses worked to prepare hides into fashionable clothing. In his diary Matthew Field recorded that he hired several Snake women to make mountain dresses out of his animal hides. The most skilled of these was the wife of Jack Robertson, one of the men that had signed up for the races. Field called her the "leader of Snake fashion." In the evening people would congregate around Robertson's tent, which Field humorously called the "St. Charles Hotel," for nightly entertainment and storytelling.

    When they were not trading, camp members were busy having fun. Men played a popular ball game called "hand" around the campfire in the evenings. On August 12, Sir William sent a letter to Jim Bridger asking him to come to the camp because "we have commenced an extensive game of ball, and we want you to come and 'keep the ball in motion." Unfortunately, the letter was never dispatched. Matt Field, the man who was asked to carry the letter to Bridger, never reached his destination because he spent the entire day exploring the surrounding region. His laxity, however, was in the spirit of the relaxed atmosphere at camp. In his journal, Field described the time with Sir William as "great days of exploring and fishing and storytelling and drinking, culminating in three days of Rocky Mountain Racing."

    The Sweepstakes began with an opening race on August 14th. A crowd gathered at a meadow along the Green River. Flags were secured on various posts to mark the site and course. After a brief race consisting of five competitors, the participants went home to prepare for a long day of racing in the morning.

    The most exciting race occurred on the second day of the Sweepstakes. Before the contest began, Sir William announced that the prize for the winner would include champagne, six leather shirts, one pair of pistols, Indian trinkets, and two mules. The value of the prize goods amounted to nearly $500. Anxious to win, the riders arranged their horses along the starting line. Jack Robertson, Sir William, Graham, and Miles Goodyear--the man who later became known as the first white settler of Ogden--were all popular participants in the race. The most noticeable rider, however, was a Snake Indian named Tom who was riding for Colonel Sublette on his sorrel horse. Tom rode naked except for a red handkerchief around his groin. His presence drew a large crowd of Snake Indians who came to support their fellow tribesman.

    With a tap of a tin pan the race began. Tom's horse darted ahead of the others and quickly gained a lead of 30 yards. Excited, the Snake fans rode along the track to encourage their speeding rider. Meanwhile, the other rider trailed behind. Graham's horse fell on a pole and broke its collar bone. A medic, Dr. Tilghman, rushed to the scene to tend to the rider. But Tom sped on. When he neared the finish line, he rose in his stirrups, threw back his head, and tossed his arms gracefully in the air. Field recorded that "he made a picture of wild grace and grandeur that threw us all into loud shouts of admiration." As if he were planning never to come back, Tom passed the judge's stand and rode on for nearly 30 yards. He won the race at record speed of two minutes and five seconds.

    The Rocky Mountain Sweepstakes ended the next day on August 17, 1843. Though several races had taken place during the three-day event, the most memorable was the one that marked the triumph of "Indian Tom." This race, as well as the weeks preceding the Sweepstakes, represented a moment of union among Native Americans, fur traders, and Europeans. In a sense, Sir William succeeded in operating one of Utah's first international sporting events.

    Sources: J. F. McDermont and Kate L. Gregg, eds., Matthew Field: Prairie and Mountain Sketches (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1957); LeRoy R. Hafen, ed., The Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West 10 vols. (Glendale, Calif.: Arthur H. Clark, 1965-72), see "Miles Goodyear" in vol. 7; Dale L. Morgan, "Miles Goodyear and the Founding of Ogden," Utah Historical Quarterly 21 (1953).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    17

    Default

    More Information:

    The historic Shoshone Indians, of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock, occupied territory in California, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming, although most of them seemed to be settled in the Snake river area in Idaho. Historical documents from the Lewis & Clark expedition often refer to the Shoshone as the "Snake Indians"; the actual name "Shoshone" means "The Valley People" . The name means “inland”, or "in the valley". The Shoshone were few in numbers, their total population being somewhere in the area of 8000.
    In 1875, resident Ulysses S. Grant established a 100 square mile executive order reservation for the Lemhi Valley Shoshone, establishing the Lemhi Valley Indian Reservation for use by the Shoshone, Bannock, and Sheepeater tribes.

    In 1905, nearly one hundred years after their first contact with the white man, the Lemhi Shoshone began their "Trail of Tears", being forcibly removed from their ancestral homelands to the Fort Hall Indian Reservation to their newly "appointed" home.

    An article by Professor Orlan J. Svingen of the History Department at Washington State University brings forth several injustices suffered by the Lemhi Shoshone. Prof. Svingen writes:

    "But perhaps the ultimate act of dispossession was the Indian Claims Commission settlement involving the Lemhi people. During the 1960s, the ICC and the federal government determined that the Lemhi Claim to aboriginal lands would have to be submitted as part of the larger Shoshone-Bannock Claim. The Lemhis were prohibited from filing their own independent claim. When their claim, Docket #326-1, came before the ICC, the Lemhi claim to their land 200 miles north of Fort Hall totaled $4.5 million. Based on pressure from the federal government, the ICC, the Sho-Bans, and the Sho-Bans attorneys, the $4.5 million was assigned to the Shoshone Bannock general fund. Rather than dividing the 1971 Lemhi settlement among the approximately 500 Lemhis living at Fort Hall, it was, essentially, divided among as many as 3000 people living at Fort Hall--the overwhelming majority of whom had no direct or indirect tie to Lemhi lands.20 Opposition to the settlement was widespread among the Lemhi, but their dissatisfaction fell on the deaf ears of the Shoshone-Bannock majority and the Sho-Ban attorneys from the firm of Wilkinson, Cragun & Barker. Udale Simmer Tendoy, a Lemhi descendant, typified Lemhi opposition with his assessment of the ICC decision in 1971."

    Today, the Shoshone are still waiting to become a Federally recognized tribe, along with over 200 other Native American tribes such as the California Chumash and the North-Eastern Abenakis. There has been much controversy surrounding the U.S. Government's plans to commemorate the bicentennial of the Lewis & Clark expedition.

    Prof. Svingen comments on the proposed bicentennial celebration:

    "...as the nation prepares to celebrate the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, it is difficult to consider how the country can celebrate the Corps of Discovery while such a debt to Sacajawea and her people remains such a scandal."

    For more details on the history of the Lemhi Shoshone, visitwww.lemhishoshone.com

  5. #5
    Johnnie's Avatar
    Johnnie is offline Rawk Crawlin GPS Totin Ghost Towning Expert
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    599

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Maya
    More Information:

    The historic Shoshone Indians, of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock, occupied territory in California, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming, although most of them seemed to be settled in the Snake river area in Idaho. Historical documents from the Lewis & Clark expedition often refer to the Shoshone as the "Snake Indians"; the actual name "Shoshone" means "The Valley People" . The name means “inland”, or "in the valley". The Shoshone were few in numbers, their total population being somewhere in the area of 8000.
    In 1875, resident Ulysses S. Grant established a 100 square mile executive order reservation for the Lemhi Valley Shoshone, establishing the Lemhi Valley Indian Reservation for use by the Shoshone, Bannock, and Sheepeater tribes.

    In 1905, nearly one hundred years after their first contact with the white man, the Lemhi Shoshone began their "Trail of Tears", being forcibly removed from their ancestral homelands to the Fort Hall Indian Reservation to their newly "appointed" home.

    An article by Professor Orlan J. Svingen of the History Department at Washington State University brings forth several injustices suffered by the Lemhi Shoshone. Prof. Svingen writes:

    "But perhaps the ultimate act of dispossession was the Indian Claims Commission settlement involving the Lemhi people. During the 1960s, the ICC and the federal government determined that the Lemhi Claim to aboriginal lands would have to be submitted as part of the larger Shoshone-Bannock Claim. The Lemhis were prohibited from filing their own independent claim. When their claim, Docket #326-1, came before the ICC, the Lemhi claim to their land 200 miles north of Fort Hall totaled $4.5 million. Based on pressure from the federal government, the ICC, the Sho-Bans, and the Sho-Bans attorneys, the $4.5 million was assigned to the Shoshone Bannock general fund. Rather than dividing the 1971 Lemhi settlement among the approximately 500 Lemhis living at Fort Hall, it was, essentially, divided among as many as 3000 people living at Fort Hall--the overwhelming majority of whom had no direct or indirect tie to Lemhi lands.20 Opposition to the settlement was widespread among the Lemhi, but their dissatisfaction fell on the deaf ears of the Shoshone-Bannock majority and the Sho-Ban attorneys from the firm of Wilkinson, Cragun & Barker. Udale Simmer Tendoy, a Lemhi descendant, typified Lemhi opposition with his assessment of the ICC decision in 1971."

    Today, the Shoshone are still waiting to become a Federally recognized tribe, along with over 200 other Native American tribes such as the California Chumash and the North-Eastern Abenakis. There has been much controversy surrounding the U.S. Government's plans to commemorate the bicentennial of the Lewis & Clark expedition.

    Prof. Svingen comments on the proposed bicentennial celebration:

    "...as the nation prepares to celebrate the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, it is difficult to consider how the country can celebrate the Corps of Discovery while such a debt to Sacajawea and her people remains such a scandal."

    For more details on the history of the Lemhi Shoshone, visitwww.lemhishoshone.com
    Thanks! For thr great history lesson you pass on some history we all would have overlook.

    Johnnie & Sheila

  6. #6
    Johnnie's Avatar
    Johnnie is offline Rawk Crawlin GPS Totin Ghost Towning Expert
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    599

    Wink Native Americans Found Gold

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnie
    Thanks! For thr great history lesson you pass on some history we all would have overlook.

    Johnnie & Sheila
    O J, You wanted to know our thoughts on that story that was posted yesterday, about that "Human-Like Bird" seen by that "new ghosttowner" on the bulletin board. Is just too scary for us. We will stick with the old west history.

    J & S

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 3 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 3 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. "Lost Gold Cache Near Redding, California"
    By Johnnie in forum Getting There!
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-07-2009, 05:23 PM
  2. Goldtown, Nevada
    By Onmilo in forum Current Status of Ghost Towns and Historical Sites
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 11-06-2006, 09:47 AM
  3. Anbody found Gold ?
    By Flatiron in forum Other
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-25-2006, 03:25 PM
  4. Gold Hill, Utah
    By Ghosttowns.com in forum History of Ghost Towns and Historical Sites
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-21-2003, 12:24 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •