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Thread: directions and maps to B.C. ghost towns

  1. #1
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    Talking directions and maps to B.C. ghost towns

    Hey ! Well I am relatively new to the whole ghost towning bit, Iwent to one in alberta now im hooked. So I thought since my vacation is in b.c. I would check out some there too. I have found some websites with names and history of the towns but not too descriptive directions to get there. I really want to find the towns that are in the back country. not really on the beaten path. Anybody? little help?
    Last edited by tater salad; 05-21-2005 at 08:34 AM.

  2. #2
    old judge's Avatar
    old judge is offline Rock Crawlin GPS Moving Map Totin Trailblazing Expert Ghost Towner
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    My old Contracts professor tried to convince me there are no stupid questions. On the off chance he was right, here goes.. Have you checked the publications listed on this site under Canadian Ghost Town Books? Some sound excellent. Can't recommend any. That's a little out of my area. So much to see and so little time. Mike
    Last edited by old judge; 05-31-2005 at 10:43 AM.

  3. #3
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    Default Southeastern BC Ghost Towns

    The only ghost towns I know of in BC are around Sandon, which is west of Kaslo down highway 31A about 45 minutes from the town. It has some buildings left, and a river flows down the former mainstreet just infront of the buildings. Also along 31A are the towns of Cody and Retallack, which are ghosts with several standing structures. West of Sandon, New Denver is a neat little town, not a ghost, but with some old structures and a former internment camp. From there you can venture up highway 6, passing some abandoned structures, to the town of Nakusp, which is also interesting. Highway 31A is itself known as the Valley of the Ghosts due to Sandon and a number of abandoned mining structures.
    Easily distracted.

    Current distraction: Railroad Depots

  4. #4
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    Check the Vancouver public library website
    for books containing pictures and maps of Ghost towns.

    SUBJECT BROWSE: "Ghost towns"

    http://www.vpl.ca


    Some authors:

    Barlee, N. L. (Neville Langrell)
    Florin, Lambert
    Basque, Garnet
    Ramsey, Bruce
    Paterson, T. W. (Thomas William)

    Garnet Basque's "British Columbia Ghost Town Atlas"
    is a good book but no longer in print as far as I know.
    The Vancouver public library central branch does have a copy.
    as does the Prince Rupert library if you're up that way.
    Some travel bookstores in Vancouver do have copies.

    The maps are hand-drawn so a professional map would be required
    as backup and some places listed are not ghost towns so a little
    research is required before you head out.


    The best source of maps of back-country in British columbia is:

    http://www.backroadmapbooks.com/

    These guys are in Burnaby (just outside of downtown Vancouver)

    The maps are in Book and digital format and available at
    most camping/hiking stores.


    Another great source of maps in the Ministry of Forests
    maps at:

    http://srmapps.gov.bc.ca/apps/recst/...s_base_map.htm

    These maps show all logging and backroads along with colour-coding
    to tell you what the conditions are of those roads, a lot
    of them are maintained year-round.

    Play around with the layers. the "Hill-shading" is very handy
    for telling you what the lay of the land is like where you want
    to go.

    The name database is extremely extensive and does contain
    the names of places that are ghost towns or don't exist
    on current maps.

    Moving your mouse of the map with give you LAT/LONG coordinates
    for plugging into your GPS. However you'll have to download
    the maps in chunks and stitch them together since there
    is no option to download.
























    Quote Originally Posted by tater salad
    Hey ! Well I am relatively new to the whole ghost towning bit, Iwent to one in alberta now im hooked. So I thought since my vacation is in b.c. I would check out some there too. I have found some websites with names and history of the towns but not too descriptive directions to get there. I really want to find the towns that are in the back country. not really on the beaten path. Anybody? little help?

  5. #5
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    Oh and a word of warning when tripping off the beaten road in BC.

    GO PREPARED!!

    A lot of these places are in or surrounded by Temperate Rain Forests. very wet, extremely slippery and what looks like solid ground or a
    sturdy tree is not.

    When exploring old building or wooden walkways
    be very carefull since everything has been
    soaked in rain most of the year.

    Paper map, compass, proper clothing...etc
    and tell people where you're going and when
    your coming back. A lot of GPS handhelds
    do not work very reliably in the forest
    the trees out here are big so it's no different
    then being surrounded by large buildings.

  6. #6
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    One other bit of info to compliment the last two posts:

    While places in western BC are known for being rainsaked, be prepared for sun, heat, and rattlesnakes east of the Cascade Range. That area is home to the only expanse of hot desert in Canada, and being unprepared for sunburn or dehydration could be disasterous.
    Easily distracted.

    Current distraction: Railroad Depots

  7. #7
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    Talking

    And if you spot an eagle in a tree DO NOT STAND UNDER IT!!!
    1 eagle is the equivalant of 50 seagulls when they crap! hehehe
    some friends and I learned the hard way last summer under
    a group of about 6 eagles.







    Quote Originally Posted by Fairlane500
    One other bit of info to compliment the last two posts:

    While places in western BC are known for being rainsaked, be prepared for sun, heat, and rattlesnakes east of the Cascade Range. That area is home to the only expanse of hot desert in Canada, and being unprepared for sunburn or dehydration could be disasterous.

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