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  1. #1
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    Default Dangerous Ghost Towns

    Hello! I just wanted to throw a question out there in regards to everyones ghost town hunting. Has anyone ever run into any 'trouble' while exploring some of these abandoned towns? Has there been anyone else there that wasn't very inviting? Or anyone living there that wasn't particularly welcoming?

    There was one time that I was doing some exploring while I was working in Colorado for a few months. I found what seemed to be an abandoned mining camp on a hill (no idea where I was .. but it was VERY far from the nearest paved road or house). I climbed the hill to take some pictures and explore. I looked down and saw my Avis rental Grand Prix sitting all alone in the distance...I had this horrible feeling that by the time I'd get back to the car the tires would be slashed. Then I kept wondering what I would do if while spying on my car, I saw a few people come out of the woods to inspect it and perhaps 'disable it' so I couldnt leave.

    Maybe I've spent too much time with the horror movies. But I got down that hill pretty quick...that camp was eerie enough as it was...and got out of there.

  2. #2
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    Default Paranoia

    I know exactly what you are talking about. I explore New Mexico a lot and the closer I get to the border the higher the anxiety. My pet fear is being in a tent with no view of what is around me while any one who comes up can see where I am and all my exits. I think the odds of some six o'clock news event happening is small but it still makes for something other than a peaceful night's sleep.
    Because of this paranoia I built some special motion sensors that I place in the camp area and on the trail or road leading to my site. The sensors contact me by radio if anything over 30 lbs crosses in front of it. Depending on the terrain, I can locate the remote sensors up to a couple of miles away for a good "heads up" when someone is coming. The real value is the peace of mind. When I wake up in the night and think I heard something I'm not afraid to stick my head out of the tent for fear my head might be lopped off with a machete. If someone is out there this system will let me know. So far there has never been an alarm except when I step outside to relieve myself (that also tests it!).
    Just wanted to tell this story so you know that you are not alone in your paranoia!
    Max
    Last edited by Max Barnett; 02-17-2006 at 10:42 AM. Reason: misspelling

  3. #3
    Johnnie's Avatar
    Johnnie is offline Rawk Crawlin GPS Totin Ghost Towning Expert
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    Cool Daangerous Adenture in the Panamints

    SaftyBar. experience reminds us of a experience we had in 1960 way up on the top of the Panamints Moutains, On one of our many trips to the famouse Panamint City, But this one trip I took my 1942 milatary jeep and planed to take some side trips so when my friend Bob, and I saw a small drit road leading off to the north of the town-site we thought it would be fun to see where it went so after about 15min. trugeing up this road we could hear a roar of another 4wd comeing up behind us, not knowing what to expect we felt we should be on the defence. We look at each other and expected the worse. As the two guys approched us we tried not to give the appearece of being scared but it wasn't easy because they had guns and we did not. Then they ask us what we were doing up there and we told them them that we were out exploring, Then they ask us would we like to see a mine at the top of the mountain and we told them to lead the way so when the wagoneer went around the next bend we found a small area where we could turn around in a few minutes we hightailing down the mountain and down Supprise canyon.

    I will tell you we never went back on these trips with out protection (Seldom Seen Slim) the old Ballarat prospector always told us that the area at the top of Panamint City was protected by (Panamint Annie) who would shoot out your radiator So in that trip in1960 may have been ( Shotgun Annie) friends or maybe she ran them off and they were out exploring also like us who knows, but it was a very uncomfortable position to be in to say the least.

    If anyone would like to read our posting about the history of Panamint city just go tho the top of the page of the bulletin board and type in Panamint city History and you can read our posting from a couple years ago. If you do plan a trip to this very historical mining camp go prepared it is a about 11miles to the top and 6 hr, hike. The road that we used in the 1960 trip was so good that a passager car could be used but now do to the landslides and washouts it is inpassable for any vehicle.

    "Happy Trails"
    Johnnie & Sheila







    Your Fellow Ghosttowners
    Johnnie & Sheila
    Last edited by Johnnie; 02-22-2006 at 09:07 AM.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnie
    I will tell you we never went back on these trips with out protection (Seldom Seen Slim) the old Ballarat prospector always told us that the area at the top of Panamint City was protected by (Panamint Annie) who would shoot out your radiator So in that trip in1960 may have been ( Shotgun Annie) friends or maybe she ran them off and they were out exploring also like us who knows, but it was a very uncomfortable position to be in to say the least.
    Wouldn't that be Shotgun Mary Slim mentioned to you?

    ~Dezdan

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Max Barnett
    I know exactly what you are talking about. I explore New Mexico a lot and the closer I get to the border the higher the anxiety. My pet fear is being in a tent with no view of what is around me while any one who comes up can see where I am and all my exits. I think the odds of some six o'clock news event happening is small but it still makes for something other than a peaceful night's sleep.
    Because of this paranoia I built some special motion sensors that I place in the camp area and on the trail or road leading to my site. The sensors contact me by radio if anything over 30 lbs crosses in front of it. Depending on the terrain, I can locate the remote sensors up to a couple of miles away for a good "heads up" when someone is coming. The real value is the peace of mind. When I wake up in the night and think I heard something I'm not afraid to stick my head out of the tent for fear my head might be lopped off with a machete. If someone is out there this system will let me know. So far there has never been an alarm except when I step outside to relieve myself (that also tests it!).
    Just wanted to tell this story so you know that you are not alone in your paranoia!
    Max
    Max,

    Would be willing to share your setup with everyone? I am very interested in what kind of setup you have.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Me too - I would like to know more about the motion detectors. If you want send me a private message.
    Visit Colorado Ghost Towns at http://www.rockymountainprofiles.com

    No Sales pitch just plenty of photos and stories.

    "I led a quieter life before I got hearing aids." Mike

    Rocky

  7. #7
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    Default Dangerous Ghost Towns

    S&W 9mm, Glock 40cal. Mossburg 12ga police riot issue.

    Yes Mr. wierd, Psycho, No Teeth, Smelly, Stalking, In-bred Nut Case..Lets Party!

    By the way, anyone seen that independent film "29 palms" wow...
    High Desert Drifter
    Ghost Town Explorations
    www.ghosttownexplorer.com

  8. #8
    tuutuutango Guest

    Default

    (THIS IS A REPLY TO "SAFETYBAR" WHO ORIGINALLY STARTED THIS THREAD SOME TIME AGO...) He stated his concern about safety and strangers during outings while alone in remote areas was bordering on "paranoia..." Below is my reply... and I'm confident it isn't shared by all, but this is just MHO.

    This isn't paranoia... it's "situational awareness," and it isn't an "Andy of Mayberry" world we are living in these days... You aren't paranoid my friend, you simply have instinct for survival -- a healthy mental process in these modern times we live in. (Google "Situational Awarness" sometime.) Here is a good link... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Situational_awareness. There are more links like this, but situational awarness should be on everyones mind when they are alone, in a remote area, or in areas they are not familiar with.

    About a month or so ago in Georgia, you might recall a college gal going for a jog in a remote state park. Her remains were found a couple of weeks later. Another young lady was killed by the same "loner" not too far from this area. 99% of the time, these terrible crimes occur to victims who were alone -- most often to women, but men are not immune to violence while alone in remote areas. I spent 20+ years in televison news, covering hard news on the Mexico/Texas border. I've seen more murders and violent crimes than many police or border patrol agents see in a career. I didn't cover stories like the"cat up a tree, rescued by the local fire department," or boy scouts picking up trash on the side of the road. I covered Hard News because I was one of the few young pups that had the stomach for it. Just having got out of the Army and after a volunteer stint in Vietnam, not many things un-nerved me. And from this experience, (the school of hard knocks) I learned the value of "situational awarness," --- what got victims "into trouble" in the first place, and I can tell you, "paranoia" can be a healthy survival thing... (I hate to give "loners" a bad name because 1/2 the time I-R-1... my wife works all the time.

    I used to carry Mace and/or tear gas, but that can backfire if the wind is blowing in the wrong direction. As a double veteran, (Army and Navy) I've been fortunate to have had very fine training in weapons. These days, I never go out there alone without my Colt or my mini-Glock (and my license to carry.) I continue to take training. It is a good process.

    A few months ago, a drunk came up onto my back porch shortly before mid-night (I live in the wilderness, miles away from the nearest town, 20 miles from the nearest Sheriffs Office and I have no neighbors nearby) and on this dark night, I was exceedingly happy I had my S&W Titanium 38 in my pants pocket, or I might have had something else in my shorts that night as I was sitting in my recliner, watching this large man lurking at my back door. I live 1,200 feet off the highway on a farm, and people just don't walk up to my back door (even in daylight, I have a fence and no trespassing signs.) And when I am not here, my wife is alone at home... She can hit a rattlesnake with a 9mm Glock like nobody I've seen. (OK, I'm off my soapbox about packing heat... but if another drunk ever comes up to my place and breaks in the back door, we refuse to be a victim and I refuse to be a victim when I am out in the boonies alone.)

    I'd recommend anyone camping alone or exploring remote areas to be exceptionally observant in this day and age of "loners." (But who am I to talk, I nearly always go out alone... I like the solitude and accept the risks.)

    I don't advise just anyone to pack heat without having some really good training, a license to carry, and refresher courses -- as many as you can find the time for. Training is everything! Firearms training is more than a mechanical thing, training is also a mental process. Just ask the guys who fly our fighter jets... when the doodoo hits the fan, there is no time to think, and the training kicks in and does the work for you. A friend of mine had to punch-out of an F4-Phantom jet one night when things went south. He said, he nevr gave it much thought what to do, the training her had took over and saved his life. He popped the canopy, parachuted to "safety" and after landing in a jungle, that's when more training came in handy. And firearms training (with refresher courses) help the mindset one needs if and when your life if put on the line.

    (Please, please, please, anti-gun crowd... don't send me hate mail or flame me... I grew up on a ranch, and guns were always a tool and a necessity. Between rattle snakes, rabid skunks, rabid coyotes, Javalina hogs... a gun was someting you didn't go out of the house with... And I certainly didn't go to Vietnam without training and an M-60... I don't go to gun shows, subscribe to gun magazines or wear camo clothing -- not that I think there is a problem with that, just don't stereotype me. A gun is a tool, not an instrument to terrorize someone with... In Texas out here on the farm, for many of us, it's like having a broom in a closet...)

    Play it safe GT friends... When in a remote area, take a friend, a dog, tell people where you are, carry a cell phone (I pack two, and have a third one built into my OnStar in my truck.) Carry a big stick. But if you elect to carry a firearm, take professional training and then take refresher courses.

    Long story made short, I was a kid growing up in the 50s when people didn't lock their doors, when kids didn't go to school and kill other kids, when "terrorist" and "stalker" wasn't in our lexicon -- When "home-invasion" and "car-jacking" were terms never heard on the evening news.

    Law enforcement and Government (Uncle Sugar) can't always protect us, especially when exploring relics in the middle of nowhere. In these "modern times" being cognizant of our environment and surroundings is more important now than it has ever been, and being "paranoid" while alone in the boon-docks is a healthy thing... If you see a stranger out there in the woods, there is a good chance it ain't "Aunt Bee." That stranger could just BE your next best friend however, but be cautious fellow GTers... This is 2008 and not Mayberry 1958...
    Last edited by tuutuutango; 03-09-2008 at 06:08 AM. Reason: Added a line for clarity

  9. #9
    bad bob's Avatar
    bad bob is offline Rock Crawlin GPS Moving Map Totin Trailblazing Expert Ghost Towner
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    Gotta agree 100%.

    If there was a msg of the year award here at gt.com, I'd have to nominate this one for that honor.

  10. #10
    LauraA's Avatar
    LauraA is offline Rock Crawlin GPS Moving Map Totin Trailblazing Expert Ghost Towner
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad bob View Post
    Gotta agree 100%.
    If there was a msg of the year award here at gt.com, I'd have to nominate this one for that honor.
    I agree as well. It's foolhardy to not be prepared and protected. Stumbling upon a pot farm in the boonies is a distinct possibility, between that and desperate illegals, drug smugglers, angry critters or just plain ornery people we never know what we'll run across.
    Tuutuu is so right, it's not a 1958 world anymore...wow...where does time go?
    Last edited by LauraA; 03-09-2008 at 05:52 AM.

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