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Thread: Breaker Breaker....CB Radio?

  1. #21
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    Default There is no one answer to this question!

    Like I say, the best radio in the world isn’t any good if ther3e isn’t another radio on the other end. To that advice, except for the Amateur Radio Service, you can’t solve all your problems with one license and/or one radio. I am a ham, I have a little 200 watt radio the size of an older CB which works on LF, HF, and VHF, I have the wire and the ability to tune the wire that I can string through the trees, plus a couple mobile antennas cut for various HF frequencies (80, 40, 20 Meters), and enough tools and knowledge to modify my radio (illegal except in an emergency) to transmit anywhere (Not just the Ham Bands) and there is never the case when with about 5 minutes effort I can’t talk to someone somewhere who will be willing to make a call to the local sheriff, AAA or government agencies, however, I studied hard, built radios, amplifiers from scratch, have played with all sorts of antennas and that route is not for everyone or even most people. BTW: I can sit in my office in Las Vegas with a 5 watt handheld VHF and talk via a ham repeater near Kingman Arizona almost all the way to Flagstaff or Phoenix. I can also have a fine conversation with another Ham in England or Australia or New York as I drive down the road. I regularly do communication (Both Ham and Commercial) for Best in the Desert (BITD) and have no problem talking 30/40 miles to a racer in trouble or 100 miles to another BITD radio person on VHF.

    For emergencies, I think a satellite Cell Phone is as good or better than all my radio equipment and knowledge. If your exploring buddies have CB’s use a CB to communicate, they work and are inexpensive and with luck someone else may pick you up if you need help.
    Last edited by Bob; 06-28-2006 at 10:49 AM.
    Yet Another Bob

  2. #22
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    Default

    Cool Bob sounds like you have alot of knowldge in this area. The VHF ranges I was talking about were un-repeated and were running at I think 20watts max. I only dabbled from reading some of what you had to say.

    So cool to find someone else who plays with HF, what is the exact freq. range for that?? The mil. was using 2-29.999mhz, is that just for mil. use??? I have a couple books on antenna con. and prop. of waves, from the USMC if you want to check them out. Most of the stuff is over my head.
    Andy

  3. #23
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    And just a side note: alot of the newer HF radios that the recon is playing with actually freq. hop, so getting one ant. tuned up just right is out the window. We just use one ant. now for a bunch of freq., as before it was all about getting that one perfictly cut, perfictly constructed antenna for that one freq. and at night another for when F1 and F2 combine.

    Cool beans Bob, I'll probably be asking you more questions here and there.
    Andy

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by photrockprp
    Hi guys,...just wanted to add my 2 cents.....well, maybe it's only worth 1 cent..... you can rent a sat phone here http://www.satellitephonesource.com/phone-rentals.html I've never tried one, but think about it often, their about 39 bucks a week,..... but might be worth looking into ........
    That price is better than the one I found last time I looked. They are getting cheaper all the time as cell phone technology advances. Soon, there'll be enough repeaters and satellites to get you some sort of coverage everywhere.

    I've been lucky with my tri-mode cell phone. Find a big hill, usually can get at least ****og. My uncle even uses the old car phones as they carry more wattage and can find weaker signals.

    Nevada might be weird though, seems we have coverage in some of the most unlikely places. Must be because of the aliens

  5. #25
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    Default Hi Coolguy.

    Quote Originally Posted by coolguy0621
    Cool Bob sounds like you have alot of knowldge in this area. The VHF ranges I was talking about were un-repeated and were running at I think 20watts max. I only dabbled from reading some of what you had to say.

    So cool to find someone else who plays with HF, what is the exact freq. range for that?? The mil. was using 2-29.999mhz, is that just for mil. use??? I have a couple books on antenna con. and prop. of waves, from the USMC if you want to check them out. Most of the stuff is over my head.
    Hi Coolguy.

    Actually the High Frequency (HF) spectrum is from 3..0 to 30.0 megacycles or Megahertz (MHZ) or in other terms using the length of the Radio wave from 100 Meters (3.0 MHZ) down to 10 Meters (30 MHZ). Within that spectrum there are chunks assigned to different services including the military, broadcast (Like British Broadcasting Company, Voice of America, Radio Free Europe), the Amateur Radio Service and other uses (Like ultra accurate time information provided at exactly 5 MHZ, 10 MHZ, etc..) Depending on the frequency and time of day communication is possible most anywhere. The Military and Amateur Service have segments within the HF spectrum to facilitate communication everywhere. Dating back to the days of crystal control most segments are multiples of lower frequencies. As an example, Amateur Radio has a shared slot just above AM Broadcasting and below the military above 1,8 MHZ (160 Metes), a segment between 3.5 (80 Meters) and 4.0 MHZ (75 Meters), a segment of a couple hundred Kilohertz )KHZ) starting at 7.0 MHZ (40 Meters), the size depending on what part of the world your in . Here in North America it is from 7.0 to 7.3 MHZ or 300 KHZ .There are also frequencies near 10 MHZ, 14 MHZ (20 Meters), 18 MHZ, 21 MHZ (15 Meters), 24 MHZ and 29 MHZ (10 Meters). It takes maybe 2 KHZ to transmit voice over Single Side Band (SSB) and a few hundred cycles to transmit Continuos Wave (CW - Morse Code). It takes more bandwidth to transmit Frequency Modulation (FM) and very little of that is done in the HF region.

    The point is that the military or a Ham picks a authorised frequency which depending on time of day (which effects atmospheric conditions) will allow communication where he/she wants to communicate with.. Simply put the sun as it rises and shines influences the ionosphere and its ability to bend radio waves back to earth. So if you want to talk from Bagdad to Kuwait at 07:00 you would probably use a military freq around 4.0 MHZ and at 15:00 Hours around 8.0 MHZ. As a ham at night I can talk most anywhere in the states including Alaska and Hawaii on 3.5 MHZ and depending on where that transition from night to day is in the world most anywhere in the world on 14 MHZ or 21 MHZ. As the sun rises in the sky I lose the ability to communicate on 3.5 and at noon I would use 7.0 MHZ to talk to people in Nevada, Arizona, Utah and California and 14 MHZ to talk to the rest of the states, perhaps Europe, Africa, and Asia.

    This is far afield from the need for solid communication between vehicles and getting assistance that started this thread. CB by the way is in the HF spectrum around 28 MHZ sometimes called 11 Meters and when conditions are right will bend back to earth (Called Skip by the CB enthusiasts) messing with local communication. FM on VHF (Marine Band, Commercial, Amateur) is typically around 2 meters is less prone to interference and more solid and pleasant to listen to.
    Last edited by Bob; 06-29-2006 at 04:42 AM.
    Yet Another Bob

  6. #26
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    ...........yeah Sun up freq. up, sun down freq. down. Those layers of the ionosphere are called F1 and F2, they combine at night to form the F layer. I rember talking from Bridgeport, Ca to Camp Pendelton, Ca on I think it was around a 10meg and at night we had to roll to 3-4meg. For shots like that I was setting all kinds of wire every where, dipoles, sloping V's, square loops, long wires, and my own creations too, that was so much fun once you hit your comm. shot. As I rember in the usmc we had from 2mhz to i think like 12 or 13mhz was the highest, but we could do just about anything with that range.

    ......and you were refuring MHZ to meters???? is that for Antenna cutting???
    Last edited by coolguy0621; 06-30-2006 at 06:33 AM.
    Andy

  7. #27
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    Default Yup Cookguy

    Quote Originally Posted by coolguy0621
    ........... and you were refuring MHZ to meters???? is that for Antenna cutting???
    Yes, Just two ways of looking at the same thing. 3.5 MHZ is about 75 Meters. The lower the MHZ the longer the wave and therefore the longer the effective length of the antenna needs to be. Since a 1/4 wave is the minimum effective length, coupled with a ground an antenna in a Humvee or my Bronco could get pretty large. The trick is to use loading coils to make the length electronically appear longer than it is. You mention F1 and F2 layers and how and when they form which goes beyond a simple explanation. Just listening can give good insight into what is happening by who you here. I would say you would be a good candidate to get a Amateur Radio License and would really enjoy it.

    Actually it all relates to the speed of light which is why the major segments are magnitudes like 3 to 30 MHZ for HF. You can start at speed of light and reduce by magnitudes until you get to UHF (Cell phones) which is from 300 MHZ to 3 Gigahertz (GHZ), VHF (Television Channels 2 - 13, Marine Band, Commercial, most Aviation) which is from 30 MHZ to 300 MHZ, etc...

    This has gone far from the original theme of the thread but has been interesting. I think you might be surprised how many of us on Ghosttowns are also hams. It is a bit of work to get the license but comes with a lot of privileges. Like I said with a Satellite Cell Phone or HF Ham rig, your never alone in the desert.
    Yet Another Bob

  8. #28
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    Yeah this did get a little off subject, but thanks for the info. always interesting to hear about this subect for me. And how should I find out info. on the Amateur Radio License................oh wait...........google it right............that's back on the subject a little
    Andy

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob
    I think you might be surprised how many of us on Ghosttowns are also hams.

    Hey, Hey, Bad Bob might be funny in the head, but he ain't no ham. Now Brian, he's a ham

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