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Thread: Tombstone, late 50's

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    Vulture's Avatar
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    Default Tombstone, late 50's

    [IMG]http://forums.ghosttowns.com/

    I think thats a 56' chevy on the other side of the street. Is the green car a Stud???
    [/IMG]
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vulture View Post
    [IMG]http://forums.ghosttowns.com/

    I think thats a 56' chevy on the other side of the street. Is the green car a Stud???
    [/IMG]
    The picture is a little blurry, but my first guess goes to a 52' Chevy.

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    Nope it's def a studebaker!
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    Last edited by bad bob; 07-12-2008 at 06:40 PM.

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    Bob,
    Stude's taillamps are WAY too large, and licence light has little vertical wing "tips".

    I may be wrong about the Chevy, but you are way wrong on the Studebaker.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brian10x View Post
    Bob,
    Stude's taillamps are WAY too large, and licence light has little vertical wing "tips".

    I may be wrong about the Chevy, but you are way wrong on the Studebaker.



    Though the original is a small photo, look at the license plate config on it and the one in the 1st photo I posted. The year may be wrong, so the tail lamps are different, but I still believe it's a studebaker, perhaps late 40's. But of course I could be wrong...you da x-pert.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bad bob View Post
    Though the original is a small photo, look at the license plate config on it and the one in the 1st photo I posted. The year may be wrong, so the tail lamps are different, but I still believe it's a studebaker, perhaps late 40's. But of course I could be wrong...you da x-pert.
    The problem is that MOST American cars of the era had the same or similar configuration-at least the common sedans of that age. I'm having a hard time finding rear end pictures to compare. Most people take front or side shots.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brian10x View Post
    The problem is that MOST American cars of the era had the same or similar configuration-at least the common sedans of that age. I'm having a hard time finding rear end pictures to compare. Most people take front or side shots.



    That's weird, these were easy to find!
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    Default Tech help?

    You guys are the experts. Am I right with the valve stuff here? I want to post this rant on another site.

    In 1921, Thomas Midgley, Jr. invented the additive, "ethyl," for gasoline. It was actually the compound tetraethyl lead. It reduced engine knock. Simply put, it placed a coating of lead on the surfaces of the valves and seats as the engine ran, thus reducing blowby and increasing efficiency.

    By the time it was removed from sale in 1986, Americans had 625 times more lead in our bodies than people living a century before. Lead is forever. Fortunately we are no longer poisoning ourselves with lead-based air polution, paint, or solder for food cans.

    Midgley next invented CFC's to modernize refridgeration. CFC's are 500 times more effective at global warming than carbon diozide, plus they last 550 years in the atmosphere. AND CFC's destroy the ozone layer in the Ionosphere. The ozone layer, if spread in an even layer, would only be 1/8th of an inch thick.

    Midgley once went before news cameras after lead poisoning was starting to gain the attention of the public and held a beaker of ethyl in front of his nose and pretended to sniff. He told the world it was harmless. But by then, he himself was showing the effects of lead poisoning and, other than that one news conference, never went near the stuff.

    Later in life, he feel ill to Polio and invented a contraption to allow himself to maneuver with a system of ropes and pullies. One day he was found strangled. He had inadvertantly hung himself. Another helpful but flawed invention by Thomas Midgley Jr.

    Much of this is paraphrased from Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything.

    So, what about the lead coating the valves stuff? NJ
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    Some or most, but not all older engines some times have to run lead additive (not really lead) or they'll tear the valve seats and valves up. You can rebuild an older engine with new style valves that take away the need for a lead additive. I'm no expert, but it seems engines that are pre-mid '70's are the most likely in need of the additive. I have a few older cars that might have been of issue, but they have been rebuilt with newer valves. But I have heard of people with original cars needing to add some now and then.

    The real threat, and this one I have studied extensively, is the lowering of zinc additives to engine oil. Zinc helps with engine wear, most importantly in the valve train. Any camshaft which is of flat tappet design (say just about every cam before 1985) is at risk with reduced oils. The lowered quantities has been linked to the failure of camshafts and other valve train parts in older engines, both rebuilt (most hurt) and older existing engines.

    It was done as a EPA issue for the most part. Many feel it's to rid us of pre-1980 cars, a long standing issue in the car world. Myself I have 4 cars, 3 being pre-1980 and of flat tappet design. So it was a major concern for me, especially with 2 engines just being rebuilt.
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