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Thread: Ghost Town Mapping Website(please sticky)

  1. #11
    Tsarevna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vacant minds View Post
    I am new to GT'ing and I couldnt agree more. Are you going to tell a robber where you keep all your valuables? Sure they know they are in the house but not the exact location.
    I must respectfully disagree. Ghost Towns are not like household valuables at all.

    Take jewelry for instance. In your house it has no potential to be destroyed by the Federal Government, developers, the BLM, the Forest Service, or any other agency concerned about 'liability' or upkeep costs.

    Ghost Towns are treasures of our past, they, for the most part, belong to the public.
    Nobody wakes up in the morning thinking "Hmmm....I'm going to go steal a historic tombstone today. Think I'll go check on the Internet to see where I can find one."

    Vandalism is 99% perpetrated by locals. It's not something people want to admit to, but it's their own nasty neighbors doing the damage. Often times it's youth having a party at the well-known "old cemetary" nearby, and in drunkeness, with the aim of impressing friends they vandalize and steal. Other times it's the local druggies stealing urns, doorknobs, pipe fixtures and wire to pay for meth.

    I think it's a shame how people get badgered that post an exact location of a ghost town. Why doesn't anyone ever mention the countless Ghost Town books published, written for profit, as driving guides? Why aren't authors getting heat?

    It's the age of Internet blogs, satellite imagery on-demand, GPS machines, geocaching and Google Earth.

    Hinting is giving an exact location, because it doesn't take 5 seconds for somebody to google it up and find it.

    The real danger to ghost towns is having people ignorant of them until it's too late to save them. How can you petition the Forest Service and get your local Senator or Representative to help preserve a site when you don't even know it exists? More of them are being torn down every year.

    Bridal Veil, Oregon, was torn down due to ignorance about it, so was Caribou, California. The clock is ticking for the rest, so let people know loudly and proudly where they can go to see our vanishing history, I say.

  2. #12
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    Default Hey Tsar

    I guess your right. Even when I research the whole trip and remember the GPS and Maps, you can still get lost going to the sites by making that left instead of right and when you turn around, oops, another wrong turn. To me thats part of the fun of it.

    The first time I went to see Tunnel Camp, Mazuma(?), and Seven Troughs outside of Lovelock, NV I did make a wrong turn. I went over the mountain range there and when I came down the other side into a huge valley, I found a small oasis there. There were 2 Cabins(from the '20s-'30s) and old of dump truck and lotsa trees with a ice-cold spring.

    At least there was very little vandalism, just several thousand bullet holes and maybe a few cans of spraypaint.

    I really don't want anyone to think I am getting on their case about posting locations, for this I am Sorry.

    I really doubt the people who destroy our lands and historic places even know what a map is.

    Take care and Happy Holidays to All
    Ted Christianson
    Last edited by teds280z; 12-01-2008 at 08:42 AM. Reason: miss spelling

  3. #13
    bad bob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsarevna View Post
    I must respectfully disagree. Ghost Towns are not like household valuables at all.

    Take jewelry for instance. In your house it has no potential to be destroyed by the Federal Government, developers, the BLM, the Forest Service, or any other agency concerned about 'liability' or upkeep costs.

    Ghost Towns are treasures of our past, they, for the most part, belong to the public.
    Nobody wakes up in the morning thinking "Hmmm....I'm going to go steal a historic tombstone today. Think I'll go check on the Internet to see where I can find one."

    Vandalism is 99% perpetrated by locals. It's not something people want to admit to, but it's their own nasty neighbors doing the damage. Often times it's youth having a party at the well-known "old cemetary" nearby, and in drunkeness, with the aim of impressing friends they vandalize and steal. Other times it's the local druggies stealing urns, doorknobs, pipe fixtures and wire to pay for meth.

    I think it's a shame how people get badgered that post an exact location of a ghost town. Why doesn't anyone ever mention the countless Ghost Town books published, written for profit, as driving guides? Why aren't authors getting heat?

    It's the age of Internet blogs, satellite imagery on-demand, GPS machines, geocaching and Google Earth.

    Hinting is giving an exact location, because it doesn't take 5 seconds for somebody to google it up and find it.

    The real danger to ghost towns is having people ignorant of them until it's too late to save them. How can you petition the Forest Service and get your local Senator or Representative to help preserve a site when you don't even know it exists? More of them are being torn down every year.

    Bridal Veil, Oregon, was torn down due to ignorance about it, so was Caribou, California. The clock is ticking for the rest, so let people know loudly and proudly where they can go to see our vanishing history, I say.



    Well put Tsar, except for a couple of mistakes, as I see it:
    1st) Many of the ghost town books were written decades ago, b4 vandalism became a real issue.

    2nd) Many problem "kids" of today and the last few years are very computer savvy and know how to search for so-called fun spots, or remote locations. They can then go there and do whatever they want. And with or without alcohol and other mind-altering drugs are free to rampage, loot and/or destroy wherever they happen to be.

    Ghost towns can be "saved" with vigilance, group "grass root" efforts and petitioning of elected officials responsible. Many of these officials are not even aware of developer plans or other GT destruction plans until it's too late. Other elected officials are aware but side with the developers. Historic Preservation Societies, and other Orgs can be helpful in saving our vanishing GTs. Sometimes having a GT listed as an historic site is the only avenue remaining.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad bob View Post
    Many problem "kids" of today and the last few years are very computer savvy and know how to search for so-called fun spots, or remote locations. They can then go there and do whatever they want. And with or without alcohol and other mind-altering drugs are free to rampage, loot and/or destroy wherever they happen to be.
    This is unfortunate but really seems to be true. For instance, no one lives near the abandoned prison at Deep Lake, yet when I visited I found it was full of graffitti and paintball splatters.

    I've listed many Florida ghost towns, and the only time I put exact locations are when the site is a state or county park. Otherwise I stick with being generally "close enough".

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    I must respectfully disagree. Ghost Towns are not like household valuables at all.

    Take jewelry for instance. In your house it has no potential to be destroyed by the Federal Government, developers, the BLM, the Forest Service, or any other agency concerned about 'liability' or upkeep costs. Apples and oranges- Jelwery has the potential to be stolen by theives. If you give an exact location to a thief he's going to rob you whether you want him to or not.

    Ghost Towns are treasures of our past, they, for the most part, belong to the public.
    Nobody wakes up in the morning thinking "Hmmm....I'm going to go steal a historic tombstone today. Think I'll go check on the Internet to see where I can find one." I agree about them being treasures and they belong to everyone. I do however disagree with they do not plan. Example: Beveridge and Piano story.

    Vandalism is 99% perpetrated by locals. It's not something people want to admit to, but it's their own nasty neighbors doing the damage. Often times it's youth having a party at the well-known "old cemetary" nearby, and in drunkeness, with the aim of impressing friends they vandalize and steal. Other times it's the local druggies stealing urns, doorknobs, pipe fixtures and wire to pay for meth. This I have no clue about so I will take your word for it.

    I think it's a shame how people get badgered that post an exact location of a ghost town. Why doesn't anyone ever mention the countless Ghost Town books published, written for profit, as driving guides? Why aren't authors getting heat? They should and if there was a forum that they all read I would be right there *****ing up a storm.

    It's the age of Internet blogs, satellite imagery on-demand, GPS machines, geocaching and Google Earth.

    Hinting is giving an exact location, because it doesn't take 5 seconds for somebody to google it up and find it. Most kids these days wont take the time out of their busy lives to look something up. If you dont give exact locations or details they will move on. Attention spans of a gnat.

    The real danger to ghost towns is having people ignorant of them until it's too late to save them. How can you petition the Forest Service and get your local Senator or Representative to help preserve a site when you don't even know it exists? More of them are being torn down every year. Most might think that this is a fight they cant win. Letters do make a difference.


    Bridal Veil, Oregon, was torn down due to ignorance about it, so was Caribou, California. The clock is ticking for the rest, so let people know loudly and proudly where they can go to see our vanishing history, I say. As much as I hate to say it, people these days dont care. If its not within arms reach they could care less. There is only a select few that really care about this part of our history. This is clearly evident by the traffic this site gets. How more in your face can you get ghosttowns.com?



    Dont get me wrong, Im not trying to start an argument. These are purely my opinions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainmanwalkin View Post


    This is unfortunate but really seems to be true. For instance, no one lives near the abandoned prison at Deep Lake, yet when I visited I found it was full of graffitti and paintball splatters.

    I've listed many Florida ghost towns, and the only time I put exact locations are when the site is a state or county park. Otherwise I stick with being generally "close enough".

    I cant imagine this was done by teens. This screams skinheads or white supremacists (which I guess could be teens).

  7. #17
    GaryB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsarevna View Post


    Vandalism is 99% perpetrated by locals. It's not something people want to admit to, but it's their own nasty neighbors doing the damage. Often times it's youth having a party at the well-known "old cemetery" nearby, and in drunkeness, with the aim of impressing friends they vandalize and steal. Other times it's the local druggies stealing urns, doorknobs, pipe fixtures and wire to pay for meth.
    I have to disagree. Where my up bringing comes from (and it's not really from Vegas), we protect our history. True, there may be one or two "natives" that break the pattern, or the occasional drunken party; but for the most part, we keep an eye out for the jerk wads doing the damage. I'd say the majority of the vandalism is someone who is not from the area. Seriously, why would they care? It's not theirs to honor, just theirs to take.

    I've seen grave markers stripped of precious stones. Buildings torn down for their "old" wood. Machinery stripped of wiring for the copper to sell. Bullet holes in everything you could imagine. Etc., etc. And I'd dare say 9 out of 10 times the known culprit was not a local.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tsarevna View Post

    I think it's a shame how people get badgered that post an exact location of a ghost town. Why doesn't anyone ever mention the countless Ghost Town books published, written for profit, as driving guides? Why aren't authors getting heat?
    I don't think anyone is getting outright badgered, just being reminded of the consequences. And how many people buy a book to find a place to go and randomly vandalize? Anyone using published articles for any form of vandalizing, like treasure hunting is a pro. And likely doesn't need this site or any other to find what they are looking for. They are probably not the worst threat to any historical site, either. I'd say the random act of ignorance or drunken behavior is. And believe it or not, the farther from the big cities you go, the lower that risk gets, and swings toward the former.




    For the most part, I feel anyone taking the time to research a site falls into two categories for the most part. Either they love the genre or are a treasure hunter. True, it's hard to tell a person's intent, even face to face much less over the web. And that's why so many feel strongly about how much, if any info of a site is given. And trying to get the G-Men involved works both ways. I have seen many more sites destroyed in the name of protection/progress/reclamation as I have seen actually saved.

    So I approach it this way:

    If the place is popular/familiar/known enough to be on a map or a website, chances are it gets pretty heavy attention from all sides of the spectrum. So it's been visited by admirers and torn up by treasure hunters. So it's probably not that big a deal about pointing someone in the right direction to find it. But I know a few places that likely less than a thousand people know of, or have ever seen. The sites' overall condition and the artifacts support that idea. And those sites I'll never really tell anyone about unless I really know them well enough to trust their intent. And trust me, I have been on both sides of that fence, and still am today. It's really, really, impossible to get anyone in the rest of my state to believe that someone from Las Vegas actually has good intentions regarding historical sites.
    "I have a .44 and a shovel, I'm sure no one's gonna miss you" - Virginia City, NV

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    Good points Gary.


    Not everyone deserves to know all the secret locations. Its kind of like a drivers license -- Its a privilege not a right.

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    Either ghosttown lover or treasure hunter? 2 catagories , that's all? Well, I am both. and I respectfully disagree. one does not preclude the other.I myself would dig in a privie if found way out in the mojave...... a relic buried 6 ft down, does noone any good....brought to light, and given to an historical society, or if insignificant perhaps like the bottom of a broken bottle, shown to neighbors and friends to educate them about our past is an admirable thing.
    While I disrespect those that would knock a large hole in the walll of an abandoned adobe structure to follow a metal detector hit and those that would tresspass, or otherwise break the law, Ghosttowning and treasure hunting can be symbiotic. One has to leave the area exactly as found however. Just my opinion,....many wonderful ghosttowners are treasure hunters.

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    There is a fine line when taking stuff. I can only imagine a small percentage of people who take things actually give them to a historical society or museum.

    Its a catch 22 if you really think about it. If you decide to take something from a site to "preserve our history" you are actually taking away from someone else. If you leave it then its there for the taking by the next person.

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