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Thread: Campfire Meals

  1. #11
    LauraA's Avatar
    LauraA is offline Rock Crawlin GPS Moving Map Totin Trailblazing Expert Ghost Towner
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    Several years ago we were camping with a group of friends, 8 people in all. Someone came up with the bright idea to combine what each of us had in our coolers and in cans to make a stew in the dutch oven. BAD idea, we had leftover meatloaf, some friends had bass, one had spicy Italian sausage, lots of other stuff I can't remember. We dumped it all together let it cook for a couple of hours and ate. It was terrible stuff, the bass added a fishy flavor (and bones) to everything in the pot. Next time we go with them, I'm sticking to Dinty Moore.

  2. #12
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    Sounds like you guys made a really wicked version of Hobo Stew.
    "I have a .44 and a shovel, I'm sure no one's gonna miss you" - Virginia City, NV

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  3. #13
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    Driving I have my camper on a pickup so I have all comforts of home. Was up on Mt. Laguna in eastern San Diego county just last Saturday night ( 3-14-09 ) and even hooked up for the night with electric at an RV camp. NICE Was cold, windy, foggy and camping out ( sic ) with the comforts of home and an electic blanket on my bunk was heaven! Really appreciated as I've roughed it a lot. Long ago in Ohio as I was building my log cabin I cooked on an open campfire out in front for months and got very used to it. Hiking I carry canned hash and sardines. Instant coffee. Usually an apple as well. Sardines are good and easy for lunch. Hash heated in a in an extra tin cup is nutritious and easy. 1/2 the can for dinner the other half for breakfast. Thanks for posting all the accounts of your camp cooking.
    - Wolfgang -

  4. #14
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    Default Aussie bushtucker

    Its known in Australia to cook your food on the engine of your vehicle whilst driving around fair dinkum! Spuds in alfoil cooked on your manifold is to die for, yummy.
    look up some of the out back characters who roam our land, Malcom Douglas, Albi Mangels ( we tend to refer to Albi Mangels as Albi mangels fairytales) People actualy put cookers in the engine bay with all sorts of meals, using the heat of the engine to cook the food. Malcom Douglas would have to be one of the best roadside bush cooks you will see. he has made great outback documentries on exploring and surviving the Aussie out back.
    rev dr g
    " LOVE MANY - TRUST FEW - ALLWAYS PADDLE YOUR OWN CANOE " (Gilbert Banyon, ww2 Digger)

  5. #15
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    Default Quick update

    Guys and gals, google Malcom Douglas, this guy is the real deal, dont be thinking Steve Urwin ( the crockodile man ) was the ultimate out back man. no disrespect to Steve. If any one is interested in Australian bushtucker, the food aboriginees lived on for thousands of years, then try to find a dvd called "Bush Tucker Man" It was done by a Major Les Hiddens, his job was to report to the Australian Army what the Aussie Diggers could and cant eat, how to find water etc. It will blow your mind to see what this guy eats. I would not recomend you to try it in America unless you no exactly what it is you can safely eat as severe toxic poisonning in the remote out back will lead to death. As we say. if the food wont kill you, the animals and insects will.
    rev dr g
    " LOVE MANY - TRUST FEW - ALLWAYS PADDLE YOUR OWN CANOE " (Gilbert Banyon, ww2 Digger)

  6. #16
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    Here in the States, there are those who do cook on the exhaust manifold.

    Back in the 1970s and early 1980s I worked for a small rural county in eastern California. There was a high altitude Marine base nearby that used to dump their "sea rations" (today they're called MRE's) by the case. Back in those days, dumps were open affairs and it was good pickings if you happened to be there at the right time. We had a fellow employee who always knew when the Marines were coming and he'd get as much as his county truck would hold and he'd distribute everything among the rest of us in the department.

    As winter weather was often blizzard conditions, I've cooked many a meal on my exhaust manifold (the sea rations were primarily canned in those days). I drove a 1973 Chevy Blazer 4WD with the inline 6-cylinder engine, which had a great exhaust manifold for cooking. Periodically I got stuck on the side of the highway and had to spend nights in my county rig (it had all sorts of county radio gear in it, so I wasn't in any real peril and the Sheriff's department knew where I was and would check in on me), and always had a good hot supper and often breakfast the next morning. Along with coffee (melt snow in a can, put in instant coffee packet).

    If I got stuck in another town, I often slept in a county owned building and didn't have to worry about spending money for food, just fire up the Chevy, heat a can of sea rat's and chow down!

    Over at www.4wdtrips.net there was a manifold cooking thread about a year ago with some great tips and shared experiences.
    David A. Wright
    Quote: "Happy Trails To You, Until We Meet Again!"

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Wright View Post
    If I got stuck in another town, I often slept in a county owned building and didn't have to worry about spending money for food, just fire up the Chevy, heat a can of sea rat's and chow down!
    One good thing about working for NDOT, I can get into almost any maintenance yard with my keys or badge in an emergency.
    "I have a .44 and a shovel, I'm sure no one's gonna miss you" - Virginia City, NV

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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by rev dr g View Post
    Its known in Australia to cook your food on the engine of your vehicle whilst driving around fair dinkum! Spuds in alfoil cooked on your manifold is to die for, yummy.
    look up some of the out back characters who roam our land, Malcom Douglas, Albi Mangels ( we tend to refer to Albi Mangels as Albi mangels fairytales) People actualy put cookers in the engine bay with all sorts of meals, using the heat of the engine to cook the food. Malcom Douglas would have to be one of the best roadside bush cooks you will see. he has made great outback documentries on exploring and surviving the Aussie out back.
    rev dr g
    There is a recipe book floating around somewhere called Manifold Destiny that has instructions on doing just that.
    I never went quite that far, but when I had my Jeep I used to warm roast beef and cheese sandwiches on the intake manifold (intent was to warm, not to cook) and have a really nice lunch on the trail.

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  9. #19
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    I prefer sampling the local greasy spoon. Cooking takes too much time and I'd rather not deal with it. When I get in real remote areas for a couple days then i tend to lean towards canned food.
    Brad

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraA View Post
    Several years ago we were camping with a group of friends, 8 people in all. Someone came up with the bright idea to combine what each of us had in our coolers and in cans to make a stew in the dutch oven. BAD idea, we had leftover meatloaf, some friends had bass, one had spicy Italian sausage, lots of other stuff I can't remember. We dumped it all together let it cook for a couple of hours and ate. It was terrible stuff, the bass added a fishy flavor (and bones) to everything in the pot. Next time we go with them, I'm sticking to Dinty Moore.
    Laura,I think you're right.
    Dinty Moore sounds good most anytime.
    Don't forget the Vienna sausages.

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