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Thread: Carlyle, Montana: Almost North Dakota

  1. #1
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    May 2005
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    Default Carlyle, Montana: Almost North Dakota

    Just over a mile from the western border of North Dakota lies the hamlet, or more appropriately, now-hamlet, of Carlyle, Montana. Now home to maybe one family, Carlyle once was a booming little farming community on the Northern Pacific railroad branch out of Beach, ND that also called nearby Ollie home. In 1941, 221 people called Carlyle home.
    Today it is a ramshackle collection of decaying buildings along the former grade who's tracks were removed long ago. The post office/store is on private property, now part of a ranch. The grain elevators and the school still stand, but gone are the saloon, mercantile, hotel, and most of the houses that made up Carlyle. Their only replacement is the wind of the prairies that blows past their hidden foundations.

    Carlyle in the distance, seen from Ollie Road:


    A vacant home and junkyard make up the outskirts:


    What remains of downtown Carlyle. The two-story building is likely the post office, which opened in 1907 and managed to last until 1986:


    In stead of fright trains, grain elevators are now visited only by the passing breeze:
    Last edited by Fairlane500; 09-30-2010 at 01:39 PM.
    Easily distracted.

    Current distraction: Railroad Depots

  2. #2
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    May 2005
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    Renton, WA
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    The schoolhouse stands empty above Carlyle. It's a pity such an elegant building likely only has a few years left in her:




    Among the few standing homes left in Carlyle:


    Easily distracted.

    Current distraction: Railroad Depots

  3. #3
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    Wow nice find...Speedy

  4. #4
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    N. California
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    Nice photos, thanks for posting. That is lovely country in the summer, with the green grass and a few trees. Not where I would want to be in winter though.

    I guess these orphaned grain elevators are not used at all anymore, even though trucks could haul the grain. Have the ranchers changed crops to hay and alfalfa, from wheat and other grains? It seems in all the photos I don't see any harvested grain fields, but at one time that must have been a major crop?

  5. #5
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    Aug 2009
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    North Central Oregon
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    What a neat find! Thanx for sharing the pictures and the history. I really like the schoolhouse too.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    2

    Default Carlyle school

    Quote Originally Posted by speedy View Post
    Wow nice find...Speedy
    How interesting. I taught the Carlyle school the last year before it closed completely in the early 70's. I took over after Thanksgiving on an emergency permit as the hired teacher had thrown a desk/chair combination across the room with some of the smaller children still in there. Although there was a gymnasium and several rooms I had seven students, one in each grade (1-7) all in the same room. There was a small room with bed, small cupboard and two-burner stove for a teacherage, however, I rode back and forth from Wibaux, MT on the Wibaux school bus (about 20 miles).
    At one time there was a high school, in the basement! When I was there the basement was a mess of broken plaster, old desks etc. I believe the building was then condemned, and the children bussed to Golva, ND,

  7. #7
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    Mar 2011
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    2

    Default Carlyle area farms

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave A View Post
    Nice photos, thanks for posting. That is lovely country in the summer, with the green grass and a few trees. Not where I would want to be in winter though.

    I guess these orphaned grain elevators are not used at all anymore, even though trucks could haul the grain. Have the ranchers changed crops to hay and alfalfa, from wheat and other grains? It seems in all the photos I don't see any harvested grain fields, but at one time that must have been a major crop?
    ------------
    The old elevators have been replaced with modern, mostly steel elevators, with augers and modern equipment - no more hand shoveling. Wheat is still a major crop but farmers have learned the more productive advantages of alternating crops. And, yes, some of the "farms" have now become "ranches" and the acreage is now hay, alfalfa, some oats and other grains that are used as feed instead of harvested for the seed.

  8. #8
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    Jan 2009
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    N. California
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    Ruthetta - welcome to our little corner of the world, which actually encompasses most of the western US and occasionally some of the rest of it in search of abandoned (mostly) places.

    Thank you for your post on the Carlyle school and for answering my musings on why we see so many abandoned grain elevators. It sounds like the teacher you replaced was better suited for another occupation, although you might have stories to tell about the seven children you taught.?

  9. #9
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    Nov 2006
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    I live in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia
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    That looks like a new roof on the bottom picture...
    "Give me a fish and I'll eat today. Teach me to fish and I'll eat tomorrow." Samuel Clemmins

  10. #10

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    I own all of block 3 in Carlyle.

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