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Thread: Most effectiveways of gathering research for Nevada mining Camps

  1. #1
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    Default Most effectiveways of gathering research for Nevada mining Camps

    Iv'e been doing alot of research on Nevada mining camps and the history and locations regarding them. I have been using numerous internet sites, Many book scans through Google books and so forth. I live in Eastern Pa where it is herd to just go to a library and scan old newspaper articles or books. Do know of any other effective ways to gather? I'm planning on going out to Nevada agian in June of '11.

  2. #2
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    What exactly are you interested in re - Nevada ghost towns? General history? Focus on a particular town? Railroads?

    A good source for books is abebooks.com. Many of the old, discontinued books are available through their network of used book stores nation wide. You'll find that even the most rare books have a good presence and are available through stores in about every state, not just the west.

    Stan Paher's GHOST TOWNS OF NEVADA (the original version, not the later, double volume, revised version) is probably the best known and widely available. It covers the entire state and is full of historical illustrations as well as those up to publishing date (1969, I think).

    Anything by Shawn Hall is good, as his books take each county separately. The entire state is not available yet, I think (I haven't checked in several years). You've likely have seen his website.

    When in the state in the future, stop at any museum will bring up a slew of publications available.

    As a published author, I've done a lot of research via the old newspapers and courthouse records and have compiled info on various sites within Nevada, although my focus at the time was eastern California (I lived in the Eastern Sierra region for more than three decades). I now live in Nevada, but am no longer actively researching.
    David A. Wright
    Quote: "Happy Trails To You, Until We Meet Again!"

  3. #3
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    Yes, i'm interested in the history and locations and anything really with the nevada mining camps. I have the Ghost town bible from Pahar, soo detailed. I'll check out abebooks.com. Eastern Sierra area is such a gorgrous area. Thank you for the input.

    Have you explored many towns or sites in NV or eastern California.

    But lastly, the best research methods besides internet websites and old books would be to check out old newspaper and Archives at a library then when I get out there? And let me know if you think of anything else.

  4. #4
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    Reading old newspapers is a lot of fun, but very time consuming. You can quickly scan issues looking for a specific topic, but it's impossible to resist the urge to settle down and read everything.

    I used to work a short week schedule when I lived near Bishop that allowed me to spend a lot of time doing old newspaper research. I'd sit at the microfilm reader in the early years with a microcassette recorder and note articles, paraphrase or outright quote them; noting spelling and punctuation. Later, I'd take my laptop computers and type paraphrased notes or quotations. I'd try to do sequencial research (continue issue by issue through a span of years), but often jump around depending if I was researching a specific person or place (I'm a published author and have done research for hire years ago). I still only covered 1900-1909 and sporadic dates before and after in the Inyo Register and other newspapers (Independence, Big Pine, Rhyolite, Death Valley Chuck-Walla [Greenwater], Skidoo, Beatty, Winnemucca, others) over more than two decades.

    The above was in addition to courthouse records, other material.

    Newspapers from established and long standing settlements (Bishop, Independence) generally tell truthful facts; boomtown newspapers often embellish for the sake of appeasing stockholders in far away places. Rhyolite and Beatty newspapers did so for the first years, but then settled down and started calling a spade a spade in their later years.

    I still have my notes on computer. I'd transcribe all my verbal notes from microcassette, later typing directly into my computer. I keep MS Word files for each year, most years run 5,000+ pages.

    You might be able to procure microfilms through purchase or library loans and pick up a used microfilm reader (rather costly, but they regularly show up on eBay). I know I've rebuilt the one in the library at Bishop multiple times for the county (I was probably the one using it most over the decades). And then plan on spending the rest of your life scratching the surface ...
    Last edited by David A. Wright; 11-16-2010 at 11:48 AM.
    David A. Wright
    Quote: "Happy Trails To You, Until We Meet Again!"

  5. #5
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    Another book that you might enjoy, long out of print, is Nel Murbarger's GHOSTS OF THE GLORY TRAIL. The book is basically a compilation of her Desert Magazine articles from the 1950s and recounts the history and her findings at ghost towns in eastern California, Nevada and Utah in the 1940s-1950s. She saw a lot of stuff that is no longer left at these sites. The book is full of many of her photos.

    The book should be readily available fairly inexpensively through abebooks.com. It was published in hardback and paperback. I have a copy of each. The hardback I found at a used bookstore in Portland, Oregon in 2003 for $5. It was autographed by Nel and had a nearly page length note to the person purchasing the book in her own handwriting.

    It's a facinating read.

    Nel Murbarger also published a companion book to GHOSTS, called SOVEREIGNS OF THE SAGE. It mimicks the format of GHOSTS and covers sites not mentioned in the first book. I believe she also published another book but it's focus is on Arizona. I don't recall the name of that book.
    Last edited by David A. Wright; 11-16-2010 at 11:54 AM.
    David A. Wright
    Quote: "Happy Trails To You, Until We Meet Again!"

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    Wow, you really have gathered alot of information throught the years it seems. Sounds like I should pick a specific area and time period and go from there. But thats a great idea, i'll check ebay for the microfilms and check for those two books on the internet. Thanks so much for your helpful input David.

  7. #7
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    Some good advice here - David is a Great researcher. Some places to go if you are really serious; UNLV and Reno Special Collections; Give me an idea of what your interested in specific and I send ya in the correct way. Example: A couple days in Tonopah just reading the daily newspaper from 1905 to 1915 will get ya a wealth of knowledge about those glory days. I could be talked into exchanging and cooperating with someone who wish to do serious research myself I have microfilm of the Post office records for instance I'd love to turn into electronic format (Much easier for digging up where stuff was forward to and when) and lot's of old maps that need to be scanned.
    Yet Another Bob

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Disappearance2002 View Post
    Have you explored many towns or sites in NV or eastern California.
    Yes. For the past 35 years I've been bouncing around Nevada and eastern California. I contributed several hundred photos to this site in its early days online, but haven't contributed anything in about a decade even though I've been to many ghost towns not previously visited or have visited in the past and visited again.

    I had a large and popular website for a decade, but dropped it in June, 2010. It originally focused on history, but I changed it in 2007 to a more exploratory site covering the eastern Sierra and Nevada. The site is back up but now owned by 4wdtrips.net, who hosted me for the last five years I was online. I gave the site owner the 4x4 trail files of the site only and it's back online in its original address at http://www.gbr.4wdtrips.net

    Not a whole lot of historical interest (the former site had numerous pages on various trips I took over the years with lots of Nevada and California ghost towns but were not part of the files I gave the new owner), but lots of photos give one an armchair experience "riding along" with me to various spots in the region. The vast majority of photos were left intact, but I slightly altered the text to eliminate reference to me or others.
    Last edited by David A. Wright; 11-18-2010 at 02:23 PM.
    David A. Wright
    Quote: "Happy Trails To You, Until We Meet Again!"

  9. #9
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    That's real about the microfilm ill keep an eye out, plus I have over 100 atlases from 1900 era that I usealso for my research but I need more specific area ones. YoI really like your Website David how you go into great detail and your photos too.

  10. #10
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    A book that will aid you to locate microfilms is THE NEWSPAPERS OF NEVADA, by Richard E. Lingenfelter and Karen Rix Gash. By using that book to reference newspapers published in the state will help you locate any available newspapers through commercial sources or libraries or eBay.

    The newspapers from the larger cities and towns always had news tidbits from the little towns, if you can't find any microfilms from specific towns. The Inyo County, California newspapers (Inyo Register / Inyo Independent) always carried news items from the Nevada towns.
    David A. Wright
    Quote: "Happy Trails To You, Until We Meet Again!"

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