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Thread: Kirk, Oregon

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    Default Kirk, Oregon

    Originally posted by Glenn McIntire


    : I am looking for any kind of information on the town of Kirk, Oregon. This town is no longer in existance. The last inhabitants left in the 1950s. I'm not positive what County it is in. The town site sets along the Souther Pacific Rail Road tracks. The main industry of Kirk was wood products. If any one has information please E-mail me.

    : Thanks,

    : Glenn McIntire

    : mcintire@teleport.com




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    Default Re: Kirk, Oregon

    Originally posted by Stephen F. Rich


    : : I am looking for any kind of information on the town of Kirk, Oregon. This town is no longer in existance. The last inhabitants left in the 1950s. I'm not positive what County it is in. The town site sets along the Souther Pacific Rail Road tracks. The main industry of Kirk was wood products. If any one has information please E-mail me.

    : : Thanks,

    : : Glenn McIntire

    : : mcintire@teleport.com



    :

    : The Oregon Geographic Names reports that Kirk is in Klamath County and "Kirk is the name of the family upon whose allotment the community is situated. Jesse Kirk was a prominent and respected Indian, an ordained Methodist minister. The name was first chosen by the Southern Pacific Company for a station name at a point that was for several years the end of the line north of Klamath Falls. The post office was established in 1920, with the name of Kirkford; why the additional syllable no one seems to know, although it is true there is a ford in the Williamson River nearby. The scheme of different names for the station and the post officehas always been unsatisfactory and in 1925 the postal authorities changed the office name to Kirk to agree with the station name." This is all I could find at this time. Perhaps the public library or the Historical Society in Klamath Falls can be of more help. Stephen




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    glenn, there is a book out by the name of 'WILL KITT" it has a lot of info on kirk and surrounding area, history of william kittridge and his history of ranching and cattle raising. i will send more info on book later with pictures.
    jim. kirk is at the north end of klamath county oregon. it was to ship out cattle from there from the cattle ranches around the area.

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    Default kirk, oregon

    for glenn
    'Bill Kitt' saga spans the whole life of Oregon cattle country
    By John Terry, Special to The Oregonian
    January 17, 2010, 12:00AM
    The only trouble with "Bill Kitt" the book is that we learn relatively little about Bill Kitt the man. That's not necessarily a bad thing.
    "I really felt that I could have sat down and done a biography just on my granddad," says Donovan "Jack" Nicol, who with his niece, Amy Thompson, is the author of a 450-page Western saga masquerading as Kitt's biography. "But that would be self-serving.
    "He did a lot, but he had a lot of other people with him -- a lot of them worthy of a book themselves. I thought, 'These were great stories, so let's bring 'em all in.' That's why I tried to cover the whole ranching picture during that time."
    Courtesy of Donovan NicolBill KittSo, while "Bill Kitt" the book uses Kitt's life "from trail driver to Cowboy Hall of Fame" as its framework, it offers near-encyclopedic aspects of cattle country life.
    For openers, Kitt's full name was William Kittredge. But he was known throughout southeast Oregon's cattle country and beyond by his nickname to the point a lot of folks might have been surprised to learn he had a longer moniker.
    His career in the cattle business spanned 1893 to 1958. It took him from a $25-a-month buckaroo to owner of one of the West's most massive cattle operations: 68,000 acres of deeded property in in Klamath, Lake and Harney counties in Oregon; Humboldt and Washoe counties in Nevada and Tehama County in California, as well as 850,000 acres leased from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in Oregon and Nevada, plus 52,000 other leased acres.
    It also earned him distinction as one of only three Oregonians honored in the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum's Hall of Great Westerners in Oklahoma City. The others are Peter French of the P Ranch empire in Harney County and Frederic Augustus Phillips, a rancher and farm credit leader.
    Unlike myriad others who populate his biography, Kitt can't be characterized as much of a character.
    "He was always a business person," Nicol says. "He wasn't a backslapper. To most people he came across as austere. He never wasted money. He was business driven, but never interested in what he was worth but in how he could produce more ... 'Can I breed better cattle, breed better horses, improve the land?'"
    He kept a bottle of Canadian whisky in his bedroom and took several swigs morning and night, "always from the bottle." Other than that he didn't drink.
    His favorite radio commentator was Gabriel Heatter, "a conservative who said what Bill Kitt wanted to hear."
    On the plus side as an employer, "He never asked anyone to do anything he wouldn't do; he was a fair man; he was easy to work for if you did it his way; and if you were working for him, you knew you had a steady job."
    On the negative side, "He was always on the go and had very little patience; he wasn't into small talk and was quick to scold if something wasn't done."
    "Bill Kitt" chronicles an era when ranching progressed from cattle, horses and cowboys roaming the open range to today's sophisticated operations of irrigated pastures and massive feed lots.
    Along the way we meet a host of hard-riding, hard-drinking, hard-partying and understandably profane personalities.
    "The buckaroos trailed the cattle a total of 425 miles through a very severe winter, with deep snows and below-zero temperatures," the book says. "After each cattle delivery, the cowboys had to turn around and trail their extra horses back to the (ranch) headquarters ...
    "Even in June the high elevations of the ... desert made it advisable to put clothes under your bedroll at night because there would be frost in the morning. ... Putting on a pair of Levi's covered with a quarter inch of frost was not a pleasant experience."
    Still, says Nicol, who was raised by Kitt and his wife, Maude, after his mother tragically died when he was a boy, "It was a very exciting life."
    "Bill Kitt" is available via info@billkittbook.com or Bill Kitt Book, 9606 Highway 39, Klamath Falls, OR 97603.
    -- John Terry, Special to The Oregonian

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    I ended up visiting two years ago. The townsite wasn't hard to find but there is nothing left other then debris.
    Last edited by hamellr; 04-22-2014 at 06:40 AM.
    Pacific Northwest Ghost Town Travel Blog: http://pnwphotoblog.com/ghost-towns/
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    Quote Originally Posted by hamellr View Post
    I ended up visiting two years ago. The townsite wasn't hard to find but there is nothing left other then debris.
    That's a bummer, thanks for the update.

    I tried to visit your link but it said there was an error and I didn't have permission to view drafts...
    Explore Forums Ghost Town and Mining Camp Forums

    Create your own ghost town galleries, blogs, forums, discussion, and much more, free.

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    Get "You do not have permission to preview drafts." from your link hamellr.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hamellr View Post
    I ended up visiting two years ago. The townsite wasn't hard to find but there is nothing left other then debris.
    Link works when you remove anything after the question mark. May not have much there, but will have to see anyway, thanks for adding the information.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamMc View Post
    Link works when you remove anything after the question mark. May not have much there, but will have to see anyway, thanks for adding the information.
    Sorry about the bad link, here is the correct one:

    http://pnwphotoblog.com/ghost-town-of-kirk-oregon/
    Pacific Northwest Ghost Town Travel Blog: http://pnwphotoblog.com/ghost-towns/
    Ghost Town Map: http://ghosttownmap.com/

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