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Thread: "future" ghost towns

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    Default "future" ghost towns

    Originally posted by natureimage


    : I am doing research on "future" ghost towns in the midwest. I'm looking for the names and locations of towns that have been economically hit hard and most people have moved away to survive and most schools and businesses have closed. In a sense, rural towns that will probably be ghost towns once the seniors who have chosen to stay have passed on.




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    Default Re: "future" ghost towns

    Originally posted by kathy


    : Here in the midwest, many small communities are

    : losing the Mom-Pop businesses due to the large

    : corporations. Automobiles and the highway systems

    : make it easy to drive to shop for the best deal.

    : But, many people choose to live out of the city.

    : In time, I feel there will be lots of what are

    : called "bedroom communities." I doubt that there

    : will be any ghosttowns.




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    Default Re: "future" ghost towns

    Originally posted by bad bob


    :

    : : Here in the midwest, many small communities are

    : : losing the Mom-Pop businesses due to the large

    : : corporations. Automobiles and the highway systems

    : : make it easy to drive to shop for the best deal.

    : : But, many people choose to live out of the city.

    : : In time, I feel there will be lots of what are

    : : called "bedroom communities." I doubt that there

    : : will be any ghosttowns.



    :

    : Jeffrey City, Wyoming on US 287 between Casper and Lander is now either a Class C ghost, or a near ghost, Class D. ( "C" is standing, abandoned buildings with no population, "D" is same but with very small population ). I believe that future ghost towns "C", will vary from state to state. Certain factors like economy, U.S. homelessness, U.S. overcrowding, climates, building deterioration, etc., will determine which towns fold, and for how long.

    : bb.




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    Default Re: "future" ghost towns

    Originally posted by David A. Wright


    : This may be out of the midwest "scope" of the question, but I would suggest that Trona, California, fits the criteria requested in the original post. Trona is full of empty houses, some dating back to the early 1900s and made of tufa and stone. The company housing built in the 1920s, when Trona was a company town, is deteriorating and in many cases abandoned. Trona still has a population base of about 1500 people, but many have departed in the past decade due to "right sizing" of the primary company and the better climate and look of nearby Ridgecrest.



    : I first moved to Trona in 1987, my wife had lived there since 1957. There were many more businesses open there, especially in the 1950s, when American culture nourished small industrial towns. Trona was even in sound shape when I came in 1987. Now, the schools, once considered the pride of San Bernardino County and one of the wealthiest in the state (due to tax base and company financial aid), is facing a dwindling student poplulation and loss of financial interest by the county and less so by the company. The look of Trona today is one of a decaying industrial town. My wife and I left for nearby Ridgecrest in 1992.



    : I've often considered photographing the abundant supply of empty and vandalized mobile homes and houses scattered about Trona and submitting it as a "ghost town" in the broad sense of the word.




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    Default Re: "future" ghost towns

    Originally posted by Coach Bodie


    : I'd have to agree with the thought on Trona. On our way to Panamint last year we passed through Trona. I felt as if I were in the Twilight Zone. It is quite a unique place!!!



    : : This may be out of the midwest "scope" of the question, but I would suggest that Trona, California, fits the criteria requested in the original post. Trona is full of empty houses, some dating back to the early 1900s and made of tufa and stone. The company housing built in the 1920s, when Trona was a company town, is deteriorating and in many cases abandoned. Trona still has a population base of about 1500 people, but many have departed in the past decade due to "right sizing" of the primary company and the better climate and look of nearby Ridgecrest.



    : : I first moved to Trona in 1987, my wife had lived there since 1957. There were many more businesses open there, especially in the 1950s, when American culture nourished small industrial towns. Trona was even in sound shape when I came in 1987. Now, the schools, once considered the pride of San Bernardino County and one of the wealthiest in the state (due to tax base and company financial aid), is facing a dwindling student poplulation and loss of financial interest by the county and less so by the company. The look of Trona today is one of a decaying industrial town. My wife and I left for nearby Ridgecrest in 1992.



    : : I've often considered photographing the abundant supply of empty and vandalized mobile homes and houses scattered about Trona and submitting it as a "ghost town" in the broad sense of the word.




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    Default Re:

    Originally posted by David A. Wright


    : : I'd have to agree with the thought on Trona. On our way to Panamint last year we passed through Trona. I felt as if I were in the Twilight Zone. It is quite a unique place!!! -- Local residents call it the "Trona Zone."




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    Default Re: "future" ghost towns

    Originally posted by Bryan Tint


    : : This may be out of the midwest "scope" of the question, but I would suggest that Trona, California, fits the criteria requested in the original post. Trona is full of empty houses, some dating back to the early 1900s and made of tufa and stone. The company housing built in the 1920s, when Trona was a company town, is deteriorating and in many cases abandoned. Trona still has a population base of about 1500 people, but many have departed in the past decade due to "right sizing" of the primary company and the better climate and look of nearby Ridgecrest.



    : : I first moved to Trona in 1987, my wife had lived there since 1957. There were many more businesses open there, especially in the 1950s, when American culture nourished small industrial towns. Trona was even in sound shape when I came in 1987. Now, the schools, once considered the pride of San Bernardino County and one of the wealthiest in the state (due to tax base and company financial aid), is facing a dwindling student poplulation and loss of financial interest by the county and less so by the company. The look of Trona today is one of a decaying industrial town. My wife and I left for nearby Ridgecrest in 1992.



    : : I've often considered photographing the abundant supply of empty and vandalized mobile homes and houses scattered about Trona and submitting it as a "ghost town" in the broad sense of the word.



    : I hate Vandals. We should move the good mobile homes to more friendly areas. LIke nearby Ridgecrest to save the mobile homes. How old are the mobile homes? Maybe those mobile homes should be locked and made with bulletproof glass. That way, vandals can't get inside, just outside. This sucks. They should leave it clean and pristine. I only like natural decay. I hope crime rates in California drop too.




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    Default Re: "future" ghost towns

    Originally posted by Bryan Tint


    : : I'd have to agree with the thought on Trona. On our way to Panamint last year we passed through Trona. I felt as if I were in the Twilight Zone. It is quite a unique place!!!



    : : : This may be out of the midwest "scope" of the question, but I would suggest that Trona, California, fits the criteria requested in the original post. Trona is full of empty houses, some dating back to the early 1900s and made of tufa and stone. The company housing built in the 1920s, when Trona was a company town, is deteriorating and in many cases abandoned. Trona still has a population base of about 1500 people, but many have departed in the past decade due to "right sizing" of the primary company and the better climate and look of nearby Ridgecrest.



    : : : I first moved to Trona in 1987, my wife had lived there since 1957. There were many more businesses open there, especially in the 1950s, when American culture nourished small industrial towns. Trona was even in sound shape when I came in 1987. Now, the schools, once considered the pride of San Bernardino County and one of the wealthiest in the state (due to tax base and company financial aid), is facing a dwindling student poplulation and loss of financial interest by the county and less so by the company. The look of Trona today is one of a decaying industrial town. My wife and I left for nearby Ridgecrest in 1992.



    : : : I've often considered photographing the abundant supply of empty and vandalized mobile homes and houses scattered about Trona and submitting it as a "ghost town" in the broad sense of the word.



    : That's what I am looking for! The Twilight Zone!

    : Living in LA everyday is so boring!

    : I think living in Washington, DC is more fun. MOre abandoned buildings to look at as well. I am born in Washington, DC, but I live in LA now. Make that Chino Hills, CA.




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    I would like to suggest Shoshoni, Wyoming, and Jeffrey City as well. Shoshoni has a popuation of around 500, but I'd expect numbers to fall over the years. Shoshoni, at face value (in some parts of town) resemble Jeffrey City.

    Also Grover, Colorado. Grover has a steady pop. of around 150/180 annualy, but sooner or later I believe that Grover will follow in the old foot steps of nearby Keota, when the town sets into an uncontrolable rate of decline.
    Ryan Hill.

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    Here in West Texas, there are quite a few towns that started out as oil boom camps in the 1920's. many are completely gone, with just the outline of streets, and a few surviving buildings. Even the towns that have survived, Like Crane, where I live, have more closed and empty storefronts then open ones. I don't see this trend reversing anytime soon, because the oil reserves will be gone soon, and there's no other industry nearby to take their place.

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