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Thread: Route 66 Adventures (Arizona)

  1. #41
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    Mar 2013
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    More from Holbrook.

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  2. #42
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    Sun Valley is the next town east of Holbrook on US 66. Exit 294 from I40 enters Sun Valley. Iím honestly not very sure what to make about Sun Valley. The only factual information I can find about it is that it is a populated place. I think but Iím not absolutely sure that Quartsite Road is US 66 as it connects with Adamana Road. Adamana was a town that died after I40 opened. Basically what is left can be accessed from I40 at exit 303. Adamana Road boasts several Trade Posts as it approaches the Petrified Forest National Park. Adamana Road used to cross the present alignment of I40 into the Petrified Forest. Adamana had a railroad stop for the Petrified Forest and had about 50 people at its peak.

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  3. #43
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    The Petrified Forest National Park was established in 1906. The park encompasses a large portion of the Painted Desert region of Arizona as well as the Triassic field of fossilized trees. The Park starts at exit 311 on I40 and loops around the Painted Desert, Old US66, the Santa Fe Railroad, the Newspaper Rocks, the Blue Mesa and several fields of fossilized trees. US66 used to run through the middle of the park but has been razed except for a monument. The ghost town of Adamana can be seen from the Newspaper Rocks of the park. The trees themselves are true fossils weighing several tons in the instances of the larger portions. The south end of the park ends at US180. From the Petrified Forest, I40 and US66 head east into the Navajo Nation. Past the Petrified Forest US 66 largely follows Pinta Road towards Navajo. Good luck getting there without Four Wheel Drive.

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  4. #44
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    The Navajo Nation is the worlds largest reservation encompassing large portions of Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. The US66 Route follows I40 through reservation towns of Navajo, Chambers, Sanders, Houck and Lupton. US66 ends at the New Mexico state line at mile marker 359. Basically this is just a jump from from frontage road to frontage road as US 66 never really strays very far from I40. Like I mentioned prior to reaching Navajo there is a large abandoned section of US 66 called Pinta Road which can be accessed with 4WD. Although I haven't seen it myself I have seen documentaries showing old travel stations similar to Two Guns and Twin Arrows on the abandoned section US 66. Beware though, this section is in bad shape with numerous wash outs making any trip a risky proposition. From the state line New Mexico US 66 continues to carry eastward towards Chicago with a very rich history and the most varied alignments of any state that US 66. But that is a story for another day, I have only about half the photos I need to do New Mexico US 66 justice. All told, the original alignment of US 66 in Arizona traveled 401 miles.

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    Last edited by El Burro Camaro; 04-13-2013 at 12:37 PM.

  5. #45
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    Before entering New Mexico there is a US 66 spur route that is one of the best roads in the country to explore. At exit 339 in Sanders there is an exit for US191 south. This section of US191 was once a spur route of US66 designated as US666. This is probably the most unfortunate and fitting US Highway designation in retrospect. US666 was active from 1926 as an original US Highway until 2003 when US191 overlapped the Arizona section to near the Mexican border in Douglas and US491 overlapped the New Mexico portion. US666 was known as the “Devil’s Highway” because of the unfortunate numbering and two very deadly sections of the road. The portion in New Mexico heading through the Navajo Nation was very poorly built and received very few improvements since 1926 leading to one of the highest fatality rates in the country for a US Highway.


    In Arizona the section of US666 between Alpine and Clifton is known as the Coronado Trail. The Coronado Trail is probably the most dangerous stretch of US Highway with about 600 curves in a 63 mile stretch. The speed limits are often only 10 MPH and there is little in the way of guard rails and shoulders. The Coronado Trail is the route taken through the White Mountains by Francisco Vasquez de Coronado between 1540 and 1542. The reason the US666 number was changed was because Arizona was experiencing high amounts of sign theft and that the local public in the Navajo Lands in New Mexico believed the highway was cursed. US191 was selected because it already connected to US666 north of Sanders and US491 was selected because it was close to the spur route of US191.

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  6. #46
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    More from US 666.

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  7. #47
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    Mar 2006
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    Sparks NV
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    Excellent photos, and looks like a lot of great stuff to see. Are you currently traveling this route?
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  8. #48
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    Oct 2011
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    Like these as well, thanks for sharing them.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob3 was bob2 View Post
    Excellent photos, and looks like a lot of great stuff to see. Are you currently traveling this route?
    Quote Originally Posted by wimc View Post
    Like these as well, thanks for sharing them.
    Thank you both again for the compliments. I was for work the last three years. I was a district security manager for my company and I had everything in Arizona, Nevada, California and New Mexico...in addition for a very brief time West Texas. We didn't do company flights for anything over eight hours so with me living in Phoenix meant that I drove about 80,000 miles a year. So basically I had a span of Route 66 from Santa Monica, CA all the way out to Albuquerque, NM. The lucky thing for me (most guys I worked with didn't think so) was that I was paid mileage to drive my vehicles rather than drive a company car. This gave me a ton of free reign to go out and explore everything I could see and wanted to see in the southwest; old highways, scenic routes, ghost towns, state parks, famous places, national monuments, national parks...ect.

    Basically a couple things turned into hobbies like visiting the National Park System, ghost towns and especially ghost highways. I would do all the research before heading out from our stores to see everything that was worth seeing on the way, it was a **** of an adventure actually. After a long time I realized that I had photos from almost everything on Route 66 and started piecing together a narrative along with organizing the photos. For example I would travel to L.A. for work and spend my days off out there too looking for stuff on Route 66 that most people had not talked or was well documented. I was hoping to finish New Mexico Route 66 before I had to leave that job and moved to Florida, but hopefully some day I will. Out of all the US Routes, Route 66 has such much history and a story that needs to be told. Places like Amboy, Oatman and Hackberry are part of our history...they need to been seen in addition to preserved in my opinion. I'm just hoping that I can document all the remaining states all the back to Chicago in the next five years.

    Incidentally some of these sections of Route 66 had the pavement stripped along I40. Its a small miracle that I didn't have any issues bottoming out or getting stuck in soft dirt in that little Ford Fiesta.
    Last edited by El Burro Camaro; 04-13-2013 at 05:16 PM.

  10. #50
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    Sparks NV
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    That sounds like a great job for anyone interested in ghost towns and history in general. I appreciate you sharing your photos and information with us!
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