Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Elkhorn Montana being dismantled!

  1. #1
    Ghosttowns.com's Avatar
    Ghosttowns.com is offline Rock Crawlin GPS Moving Map Totin Trailblazing Expert Ghost Towner
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    6,604

    Default Elkhorn Montana being dismantled!

    Originally posted by Cat Ripley

    : Historic ghost town being dismantled for lumber

    : Eve Byron
    : The (Helena) Independent Record

    : August 24, 2003 2:42 a.m.
    : ELKHORN, Mont. At the end of this month, only the ghosts will remain of about 10 buildings in this historic mining town, including the once-imposing Metropolitan Hotel.
    : Harsh winters and howling winds did their best to push over and collapse the remains of the community that was home to 2,500 people in the 1890s. Now, Hilton Hern, who owns Montana Rustic Lumber, is finishing at least part of the job.

    : Two of the buildings the Metropolitan Hotel and an old barn are being dismantled piece by piece, and probably will be reconstructed in the ski resort of Big Sky, Hern said.

    : About five others, including an old saloon and a school known as "the teachery," already are lying in pieces on the ground, their gray and weathered timbers probably slated for siding someone's home, for interior wainscoting or for picture frames.

    : A melancholic air wafts through what's left of Elkhorn as the graying slats are stripped from these buildings, some of which have defied the elements for 120 years. While Hern acknowledges the loss, he also looks at this as giving the historic structures a new life.

    : "These are unusual buildings, not just because of their history, but for a lot of different reasons," he said, eyeing the Metropolitan's sagging front porch. "We care about them and want to set them back to where they can be used. . . . There's over a million board feet of lumber that we've salvaged."

    : The Metropolitan Hotel, as well as most of the other buildings east of that on Elkhorn's Main Street, has been in Dave Walker's family since 1916. He has no regrets about giving them to Hern to tear down.

    : "Ever since I came home from World War II, my heart's been in my throat that some idiot would get into those buildings and hurt themselves, then sue," Walker said. "Or you get some other moron who's smoking a cigarette and doesn't put it out properly, just drops it on the floor and burns down the whole place.

    : Removing the buildings leaves a gaping void in the world of Bud Smith, who has lived in Elkhorn for 65 years. He could see the Metropolitan from his front porch it's just a few yards down the road from his house and he fears that this is the fate of the rest of the historic structures.

    : "I don't blame the guy who owns them and is tearing them down because of the liability," Smith says. "It's just one of those things that a lot of us can see why it's necessary, I guess, but it is just that all of a sudden everything you grew up with is being torn down. I guess that's progress."

    : The town of Elkhorn was born when silver was discovered in 1870 by Peter Wys, and it boomed until the fall of silver prices in 1896. Numerous saloons lined the streets, as did schools, doctor's offices, hotels, a post office, butcher shop, jewelry store and boarding house, as fortune seekers came from all over the world.

    : But the town also was home to tragedy. During the winter of 1888-89, diphtheria killed hundreds, particularly children. Smith said that other tragedies seem to haunt the town, untold personal calamities that have pushed people away.

    : "Very few people who used to live here come back," he said. "The old timers the women especially never come back to Elkhorn. The women say there's too many bad memories and they won't even talk about Elkhorn."

    : So, many of the buildings are owned by people who live elsewhere, which probably is another reason why they're in such disrepair, theorizes Ron McGinnis, who runs a small store near the entrance to town, across the street from where his great-grandmother lived.

    : That house now leans at a 45-degree pitch, held up only by the adjacent building. McGinnis says that he'd like to see it straightened and topped by a new roof, which would add another 20 years to its life. But he doesn't own the home and the people who do aren't willing to make the investment at least a couple thousand dollars to stabilize the structure.

    : Down the block from his house, McGinnis walks around to the back of the Metropolitan Hotel, whose roof is leaning about a foot farther to the north than the foundation.

    : "Last week, someone forgot to close the back door," he says. "I came back here to put a piece of particle board over the opening. I was nailing it on and a brick fell off the chimney. I said, 'The **** with that' and put screws in instead."

    : McGinnis tells of tourists who stop by, and he warns them against going into most of the privately owned buildings for safety's sake.

    : He says it was no secret that Walker has been trying to get rid of his buildings for years.

    : "I understand how people feel about these buildings coming down, but it comes to a point in time where if you knew for several years what was going to happen, why didn't they try to get these places fixed up?" McGinnis said.

    : Two buildings in Elkhorn the Fraternity Hall and Gillian Hall were acquired in the early 1980s by the state. The Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks stabilized the halls in 1993 at a cost of about $100,000, said Craig Marr, FWP parks manager.

    : Both are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Marr and others said they were saddened to learn of the loss of the buildings, which are across the road from the two halls. The town has been called one of the most important historical sites in the West due to the intact nature of the site. Others note that it's probably the only noncommercialized historic mining town left in Montana.

    : "It's one of the best representations of the mining towns that we have in the state," said Kate Hampton, a historian with the Montana Historic Preservation Office. "All those pieces put together, from the most spectacular buildings to the adits, contribute to our understanding of how the community worked. It's all a link in the chain."

    : Hampton is quick to say that as privately owned structures, the owners have every right to dispose of the buildings in Elkhorn as they see fit.

    : "We can make suggestions and encourage them to do the right thing like leave the buildings in place but technically, we can't do anything. We don't even have any preservation money in the state to offer them, so it is frustrating," Hampton said.

    : So instead, Hern's crews are using crowbars and a small crane to pry apart the Metropolitan. Each piece is numbered and mapped, so that the building can be reconstructed somewhere else.

    : "We want people to know that we're saving history," Hern says. "I like to think we'll give it a new home and it'll last another 150 years."

    : But even if these Elkhorn buildings are reconstructed, Montanans have still lost a link to their past, according to John DeHaas with the Montana Ghost Town Preservation Society.

    : "When you move a building and sometimes that has to be done it loses its historical significance," DeHaas said. "It becomes just a novelty."



    : Sunday, August 24, 2003


  2. #2
    Ghosttowns.com's Avatar
    Ghosttowns.com is offline Rock Crawlin GPS Moving Map Totin Trailblazing Expert Ghost Towner
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    6,604

    Default Re: Elkhorn Montana being dismantled!

    Originally posted by Johnnie Family

    : : Historic ghost town being dismantled for lumber

    : : Eve Byron
    : : The (Helena) Independent Record

    : : August 24, 2003 2:42 a.m.
    : : ELKHORN, Mont. At the end of this month, only the ghosts will remain of about 10 buildings in this historic mining town, including the once-imposing Metropolitan Hotel.
    : : Harsh winters and howling winds did their best to push over and collapse the remains of the community that was home to 2,500 people in the 1890s. Now, Hilton Hern, who owns Montana Rustic Lumber, is finishing at least part of the job.

    : : Two of the buildings the Metropolitan Hotel and an old barn are being dismantled piece by piece, and probably will be reconstructed in the ski resort of Big Sky, Hern said.

    : : About five others, including an old saloon and a school known as "the teachery," already are lying in pieces on the ground, their gray and weathered timbers probably slated for siding someone's home, for interior wainscoting or for picture frames.

    : : A melancholic air wafts through what's left of Elkhorn as the graying slats are stripped from these buildings, some of which have defied the elements for 120 years. While Hern acknowledges the loss, he also looks at this as giving the historic structures a new life.

    : : "These are unusual buildings, not just because of their history, but for a lot of different reasons," he said, eyeing the Metropolitan's sagging front porch. "We care about them and want to set them back to where they can be used. . . . There's over a million board feet of lumber that we've salvaged."

    : : The Metropolitan Hotel, as well as most of the other buildings east of that on Elkhorn's Main Street, has been in Dave Walker's family since 1916. He has no regrets about giving them to Hern to tear down.

    : : "Ever since I came home from World War II, my heart's been in my throat that some idiot would get into those buildings and hurt themselves, then sue," Walker said. "Or you get some other moron who's smoking a cigarette and doesn't put it out properly, just drops it on the floor and burns down the whole place.

    : : Removing the buildings leaves a gaping void in the world of Bud Smith, who has lived in Elkhorn for 65 years. He could see the Metropolitan from his front porch it's just a few yards down the road from his house and he fears that this is the fate of the rest of the historic structures.

    : : "I don't blame the guy who owns them and is tearing them down because of the liability," Smith says. "It's just one of those things that a lot of us can see why it's necessary, I guess, but it is just that all of a sudden everything you grew up with is being torn down. I guess that's progress."

    : : The town of Elkhorn was born when silver was discovered in 1870 by Peter Wys, and it boomed until the fall of silver prices in 1896. Numerous saloons lined the streets, as did schools, doctor's offices, hotels, a post office, butcher shop, jewelry store and boarding house, as fortune seekers came from all over the world.

    : : But the town also was home to tragedy. During the winter of 1888-89, diphtheria killed hundreds, particularly children. Smith said that other tragedies seem to haunt the town, untold personal calamities that have pushed people away.

    : : "Very few people who used to live here come back," he said. "The old timers the women especially never come back to Elkhorn. The women say there's too many bad memories and they won't even talk about Elkhorn."

    : : So, many of the buildings are owned by people who live elsewhere, which probably is another reason why they're in such disrepair, theorizes Ron McGinnis, who runs a small store near the entrance to town, across the street from where his great-grandmother lived.

    : : That house now leans at a 45-degree pitch, held up only by the adjacent building. McGinnis says that he'd like to see it straightened and topped by a new roof, which would add another 20 years to its life. But he doesn't own the home and the people who do aren't willing to make the investment at least a couple thousand dollars to stabilize the structure.

    : : Down the block from his house, McGinnis walks around to the back of the Metropolitan Hotel, whose roof is leaning about a foot farther to the north than the foundation.

    : : "Last week, someone forgot to close the back door," he says. "I came back here to put a piece of particle board over the opening. I was nailing it on and a brick fell off the chimney. I said, 'The **** with that' and put screws in instead."

    : : McGinnis tells of tourists who stop by, and he warns them against going into most of the privately owned buildings for safety's sake.

    : : He says it was no secret that Walker has been trying to get rid of his buildings for years.

    : : "I understand how people feel about these buildings coming down, but it comes to a point in time where if you knew for several years what was going to happen, why didn't they try to get these places fixed up?" McGinnis said.

    : : Two buildings in Elkhorn the Fraternity Hall and Gillian Hall were acquired in the early 1980s by the state. The Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks stabilized the halls in 1993 at a cost of about $100,000, said Craig Marr, FWP parks manager.

    : : Both are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Marr and others said they were saddened to learn of the loss of the buildings, which are across the road from the two halls. The town has been called one of the most important historical sites in the West due to the intact nature of the site. Others note that it's probably the only noncommercialized historic mining town left in Montana.

    : : "It's one of the best representations of the mining towns that we have in the state," said Kate Hampton, a historian with the Montana Historic Preservation Office. "All those pieces put together, from the most spectacular buildings to the adits, contribute to our understanding of how the community worked. It's all a link in the chain."

    : : Hampton is quick to say that as privately owned structures, the owners have every right to dispose of the buildings in Elkhorn as they see fit.

    : : "We can make suggestions and encourage them to do the right thing like leave the buildings in place but technically, we can't do anything. We don't even have any preservation money in the state to offer them, so it is frustrating," Hampton said.

    : : So instead, Hern's crews are using crowbars and a small crane to pry apart the Metropolitan. Each piece is numbered and mapped, so that the building can be reconstructed somewhere else.

    : : "We want people to know that we're saving history," Hern says. "I like to think we'll give it a new home and it'll last another 150 years."

    : : But even if these Elkhorn buildings are reconstructed, Montanans have still lost a link to their past, according to John DeHaas with the Montana Ghost Town Preservation Society.

    : : "When you move a building and sometimes that has to be done it loses its historical significance," DeHaas said. "It becomes just a novelty."


    : : Sunday, August 24, 2003 "Just quick note"

    : from the desk of Johnnie, fellow researcher, and historian, of western history.

    : The news of "ELkhorn" disappearing into history sure is not, what all of us want to hear, "Elkhorn" is one of our "favorites" but because of its remote location and the harsh winters that this "Gem" has had to indured over the last 100 years, is just one of hundreds, of ghost towns that will follow that path, And then they will become just sites. Some of us have seen so many ghost town's dissappear over the years, But some have been saved from oblivion, And we all can be thankfull for that. I guess all we can do is enjoy what is left and hope that future generations think the same way as the rest of do.

    : From the desk of
    : Johnnie & Family


  3. #3
    Ghosttowns.com's Avatar
    Ghosttowns.com is offline Rock Crawlin GPS Moving Map Totin Trailblazing Expert Ghost Towner
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    6,604

    Default Re: Elkhorn Montana being dismantled!

    Originally posted by Tom Wood

    : : Historic ghost town being dismantled for lumber

    : : Eve Byron
    : : The (Helena) Independent Record

    : : August 24, 2003 2:42 a.m.
    : : ELKHORN, Mont. At the end of this month, only the ghosts will remain of about 10 buildings in this historic mining town, including the once-imposing Metropolitan Hotel.
    : : Harsh winters and howling winds did their best to push over and collapse the remains of the community that was home to 2,500 people in the 1890s. Now, Hilton Hern, who owns Montana Rustic Lumber, is finishing at least part of the job.

    : : Two of the buildings the Metropolitan Hotel and an old barn are being dismantled piece by piece, and probably will be reconstructed in the ski resort of Big Sky, Hern said.

    : : About five others, including an old saloon and a school known as "the teachery," already are lying in pieces on the ground, their gray and weathered timbers probably slated for siding someone's home, for interior wainscoting or for picture frames.

    : : A melancholic air wafts through what's left of Elkhorn as the graying slats are stripped from these buildings, some of which have defied the elements for 120 years. While Hern acknowledges the loss, he also looks at this as giving the historic structures a new life.

    : : "These are unusual buildings, not just because of their history, but for a lot of different reasons," he said, eyeing the Metropolitan's sagging front porch. "We care about them and want to set them back to where they can be used. . . . There's over a million board feet of lumber that we've salvaged."

    : : The Metropolitan Hotel, as well as most of the other buildings east of that on Elkhorn's Main Street, has been in Dave Walker's family since 1916. He has no regrets about giving them to Hern to tear down.

    : : "Ever since I came home from World War II, my heart's been in my throat that some idiot would get into those buildings and hurt themselves, then sue," Walker said. "Or you get some other moron who's smoking a cigarette and doesn't put it out properly, just drops it on the floor and burns down the whole place.

    : : Removing the buildings leaves a gaping void in the world of Bud Smith, who has lived in Elkhorn for 65 years. He could see the Metropolitan from his front porch it's just a few yards down the road from his house and he fears that this is the fate of the rest of the historic structures.

    : : "I don't blame the guy who owns them and is tearing them down because of the liability," Smith says. "It's just one of those things that a lot of us can see why it's necessary, I guess, but it is just that all of a sudden everything you grew up with is being torn down. I guess that's progress."

    : : The town of Elkhorn was born when silver was discovered in 1870 by Peter Wys, and it boomed until the fall of silver prices in 1896. Numerous saloons lined the streets, as did schools, doctor's offices, hotels, a post office, butcher shop, jewelry store and boarding house, as fortune seekers came from all over the world.

    : : But the town also was home to tragedy. During the winter of 1888-89, diphtheria killed hundreds, particularly children. Smith said that other tragedies seem to haunt the town, untold personal calamities that have pushed people away.

    : : "Very few people who used to live here come back," he said. "The old timers the women especially never come back to Elkhorn. The women say there's too many bad memories and they won't even talk about Elkhorn."

    : : So, many of the buildings are owned by people who live elsewhere, which probably is another reason why they're in such disrepair, theorizes Ron McGinnis, who runs a small store near the entrance to town, across the street from where his great-grandmother lived.

    : : That house now leans at a 45-degree pitch, held up only by the adjacent building. McGinnis says that he'd like to see it straightened and topped by a new roof, which would add another 20 years to its life. But he doesn't own the home and the people who do aren't willing to make the investment at least a couple thousand dollars to stabilize the structure.

    : : Down the block from his house, McGinnis walks around to the back of the Metropolitan Hotel, whose roof is leaning about a foot farther to the north than the foundation.

    : : "Last week, someone forgot to close the back door," he says. "I came back here to put a piece of particle board over the opening. I was nailing it on and a brick fell off the chimney. I said, 'The **** with that' and put screws in instead."

    : : McGinnis tells of tourists who stop by, and he warns them against going into most of the privately owned buildings for safety's sake.

    : : He says it was no secret that Walker has been trying to get rid of his buildings for years.

    : : "I understand how people feel about these buildings coming down, but it comes to a point in time where if you knew for several years what was going to happen, why didn't they try to get these places fixed up?" McGinnis said.

    : : Two buildings in Elkhorn the Fraternity Hall and Gillian Hall were acquired in the early 1980s by the state. The Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks stabilized the halls in 1993 at a cost of about $100,000, said Craig Marr, FWP parks manager.

    : : Both are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Marr and others said they were saddened to learn of the loss of the buildings, which are across the road from the two halls. The town has been called one of the most important historical sites in the West due to the intact nature of the site. Others note that it's probably the only noncommercialized historic mining town left in Montana.

    : : "It's one of the best representations of the mining towns that we have in the state," said Kate Hampton, a historian with the Montana Historic Preservation Office. "All those pieces put together, from the most spectacular buildings to the adits, contribute to our understanding of how the community worked. It's all a link in the chain."

    : : Hampton is quick to say that as privately owned structures, the owners have every right to dispose of the buildings in Elkhorn as they see fit.

    : : "We can make suggestions and encourage them to do the right thing like leave the buildings in place but technically, we can't do anything. We don't even have any preservation money in the state to offer them, so it is frustrating," Hampton said.

    : : So instead, Hern's crews are using crowbars and a small crane to pry apart the Metropolitan. Each piece is numbered and mapped, so that the building can be reconstructed somewhere else.

    : : "We want people to know that we're saving history," Hern says. "I like to think we'll give it a new home and it'll last another 150 years."

    : : But even if these Elkhorn buildings are reconstructed, Montanans have still lost a link to their past, according to John DeHaas with the Montana Ghost Town Preservation Society.

    : : "When you move a building and sometimes that has to be done it loses its historical significance," DeHaas said. "It becomes just a novelty."


    : : Sunday, August 24, 2003

    : It's a darned shame that Mr. Walker is allowing such a truly historical site to loose the approximately 10 buildings that he owns.

    : I had the pleasure of visiting Elkhorn in 1971 and in 1991. I have never seen such a beautiful setting for a ghost town. It is definately one of my all time favorites!


  4. #4
    Ghosttowns.com's Avatar
    Ghosttowns.com is offline Rock Crawlin GPS Moving Map Totin Trailblazing Expert Ghost Towner
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    6,604

    Default Re: Elkhorn Montana being dismantled!

    Originally posted by marion black

    : : Historic ghost town being dismantled for lumber

    : : Eve Byron
    : : The (Helena) Independent Record

    : : August 24, 2003 2:42 a.m.
    : : ELKHORN, Mont. At the end of this month, only the ghosts will remain of about 10 buildings in this historic mining town, including the once-imposing Metropolitan Hotel.
    : : Harsh winters and howling winds did their best to push over and collapse the remains of the community that was home to 2,500 people in the 1890s. Now, Hilton Hern, who owns Montana Rustic Lumber, is finishing at least part of the job.

    : : Two of the buildings the Metropolitan Hotel and an old barn are being dismantled piece by piece, and probably will be reconstructed in the ski resort of Big Sky, Hern said.

    : : About five others, including an old saloon and a school known as "the teachery," already are lying in pieces on the ground, their gray and weathered timbers probably slated for siding someone's home, for interior wainscoting or for picture frames.


  5. #5
    Ghosttowns.com's Avatar
    Ghosttowns.com is offline Rock Crawlin GPS Moving Map Totin Trailblazing Expert Ghost Towner
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    6,604

    Default Re: Elkhorn Montana being dismantled!

    Originally posted by marion black

    : : Historic ghost town being dismantled for lumber

    : : Eve Byron
    : : The (Helena) Independent Record

    : : August 24, 2003 2:42 a.m.
    : : ELKHORN, Mont. At the end of this month, only the ghosts will remain of about 10 buildings in this historic mining town, including the once-imposing Metropolitan Hotel.
    : : Harsh winters and howling winds did their best to push over and collapse the remains of the community that was home to 2,500 people in the 1890s. Now, Hilton Hern, who owns Montana Rustic Lumber, is finishing at least part of the job.

    : : Two of the buildings the Metropolitan Hotel and an old barn are being dismantled piece by piece, and probably will be reconstructed in the ski resort of Big Sky, Hern said.

    : : About five others, including an old saloon and a school known as "the teachery," already are lying in pieces on the ground, their gray and weathered timbers probably slated for siding someone's home, for interior wainscoting or for picture frames.

    : : A melancholic air wafts through what's left of Elkhorn as the graying slats are stripped from these buildings, some of which have defied the elements for 120 years. While Hern acknowledges the loss, he also looks at this as giving the historic structures a new life.

    : : "These are unusual buildings, not just because of their history, but for a lot of different reasons," he said, eyeing the Metropolitan's sagging front porch. "We care about them and want to set them back to where they can be used. . . . There's over a million board feet of lumber that we've salvaged."

    : : The Metropolitan Hotel, as well as most of the other buildings east of that on Elkhorn's Main Street, has been in Dave Walker's family since 1916. He has no regrets about giving them to Hern to tear down.

    : : "Ever since I came home from World War II, my heart's been in my throat that some idiot would get into those buildings and hurt themselves, then sue," Walker said. "Or you get some other moron who's smoking a cigarette and doesn't put it out properly, just drops it on the floor and burns down the whole place.

    : : Removing the buildings leaves a gaping void in the world of Bud Smith, who has lived in Elkhorn for 65 years. He could see the Metropolitan from his front porch it's just a few yards down the road from his house and he fears that this is the fate of the rest of the historic structures.

    : : "I don't blame the guy who owns them and is tearing them down because of the liability," Smith says. "It's just one of those things that a lot of us can see why it's necessary, I guess, but it is just that all of a sudden everything you grew up with is being torn down. I guess that's progress."

    : : The town of Elkhorn was born when silver was discovered in 1870 by Peter Wys, and it boomed until the fall of silver prices in 1896. Numerous saloons lined the streets, as did schools, doctor's offices, hotels, a post office, butcher shop, jewelry store and boarding house, as fortune seekers came from all over the world.

    : : But the town also was home to tragedy. During the winter of 1888-89, diphtheria killed hundreds, particularly children. Smith said that other tragedies seem to haunt the town, untold personal calamities that have pushed people away.

    : : "Very few people who used to live here come back," he said. "The old timers the women especially never come back to Elkhorn. The women say there's too many bad memories and they won't even talk about Elkhorn."

    : : So, many of the buildings are owned by people who live elsewhere, which probably is another reason why they're in such disrepair, theorizes Ron McGinnis, who runs a small store near the entrance to town, across the street from where his great-grandmother lived.

    : : That house now leans at a 45-degree pitch, held up only by the adjacent building. McGinnis says that he'd like to see it straightened and topped by a new roof, which would add another 20 years to its life. But he doesn't own the home and the people who do aren't willing to make the investment at least a couple thousand dollars to stabilize the structure.

    : : Down the block from his house, McGinnis walks around to the back of the Metropolitan Hotel, whose roof is leaning about a foot farther to the north than the foundation.

    : : "Last week, someone forgot to close the back door," he says. "I came back here to put a piece of particle board over the opening. I was nailing it on and a brick fell off the chimney. I said, 'The **** with that' and put screws in instead."

    : : McGinnis tells of tourists who stop by, and he warns them against going into most of the privately owned buildings for safety's sake.

    : : He says it was no secret that Walker has been trying to get rid of his buildings for years.

    : : "I understand how people feel about these buildings coming down, but it comes to a point in time where if you knew for several years what was going to happen, why didn't they try to get these places fixed up?" McGinnis said.

    : : Two buildings in Elkhorn the Fraternity Hall and Gillian Hall were acquired in the early 1980s by the state. The Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks stabilized the halls in 1993 at a cost of about $100,000, said Craig Marr, FWP parks manager.

    : : Both are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Marr and others said they were saddened to learn of the loss of the buildings, which are across the road from the two halls. The town has been called one of the most important historical sites in the West due to the intact nature of the site. Others note that it's probably the only noncommercialized historic mining town left in Montana.

    : : "It's one of the best representations of the mining towns that we have in the state," said Kate Hampton, a historian with the Montana Historic Preservation Office. "All those pieces put together, from the most spectacular buildings to the adits, contribute to our understanding of how the community worked. It's all a link in the chain."

    : : Hampton is quick to say that as privately owned structures, the owners have every right to dispose of the buildings in Elkhorn as they see fit.

    : : "We can make suggestions and encourage them to do the right thing like leave the buildings in place but technically, we can't do anything. We don't even have any preservation money in the state to offer them, so it is frustrating," Hampton said.

    : : So instead, Hern's crews are using crowbars and a small crane to pry apart the Metropolitan. Each piece is numbered and mapped, so that the building can be reconstructed somewhere else.

    : : "We want people to know that we're saving history," Hern says. "I like to think we'll give it a new home and it'll last another 150 years."

    : : But even if these Elkhorn buildings are reconstructed, Montanans have still lost a link to their past, according to John DeHaas with the Montana Ghost Town Preservation Society.

    : : "When you move a building and sometimes that has to be done it loses its historical significance," DeHaas said. "It becomes just a novelty."


    : : Sunday, August 24, 2003



Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Helpful advice for Montana?
    By Richard in forum Directions and Locations of Ghost Towns
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-02-2006, 03:59 AM
  2. Looking for Montana Friends
    By Richard in forum Getting There!
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-24-2005, 01:02 PM
  3. Log Cabin for Sale in Elkhorn, MT
    By Ghosttowns.com in forum For Sale/Want Ads
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-16-2003, 07:14 AM
  4. Elkhorn, Montana - Do you know the history of Elkhorn?
    By Ghosttowns.com in forum History of Ghost Towns and Historical Sites
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-09-2000, 12:31 PM
  5. Coolidge, Montana
    By Ghosttowns.com in forum Directions and Locations of Ghost Towns
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-23-1998, 09:08 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •